The Working Man (1933)

73,75 or 77 mins | Comedy-drama | 6 May 1933

Director:

John G. Adolfi

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Editor:

Owen Marks

Production Designer:

Jack Okey

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film's working title was The Adopted Father. According to production notes in the file on the film in the AMPAS library, shooting lasted for eighteen days and the film's total cost was $199,000. NYT incorrectly credited Douglas Dumbrille with the role of "Hammersmith." The 1936 Twentieth Century-Fox film Everybody's Old Man was based on the same source (see entry). ...

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The film's working title was The Adopted Father. According to production notes in the file on the film in the AMPAS library, shooting lasted for eighteen days and the film's total cost was $199,000. NYT incorrectly credited Douglas Dumbrille with the role of "Hammersmith." The 1936 Twentieth Century-Fox film Everybody's Old Man was based on the same source (see entry).

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
12 Apr 1933
p. 8
Motion Picture Daily
12 Apr 1933
p. 7
Motion Picture Herald
8 Apr 1933
pp. 26-27
New York Times
21 Apr 1933
p. 20
Variety
25 Apr 1933
p. 15
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Adopted Father
Release Date:
6 May 1933
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
24 April 1933
LP3825
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
73,75 or 77
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

The Reeves Shoe Company and the Hartland Shoe Company have been friendly rivals ever since John Reeves and Tom Hartland fell in love with the same woman. Tom Hartland won her while John Reeves remained a bachelor, hiring his ambitious young nephew, Benjamin Burnett, as his general manager. After Tom Hartland dies, Reeves overhears Benjamin muse that he is slipping. Annoyed, he decides to go fishing in Maine and leave Benjamin to run the company without him, just to see how well he will do. In Maine, Reeves meets Jenny and Tommy Hartland, the two undisciplined children of his old rival. Disturbed by their careless lifestyle, Reeves pretends to be an old fisherman named John Walton and contrives to be taken to New York by the brother and sister. Once there, he sees that the Hartland factory is being mismanaged by Fred Pettison. He has himself appointed a trustee of the Hartland estate in order to force the Hartlands to take charge of their lives. Tommy starts to learn the business, and Jenny gets a job at the Reeves Company under an assumed name. Reeves helps Tommy run the business, making it successful again. After learning that Pettison is trying to sell the business to a syndicate at a profit for himself, Reeves fires him. Jenny and Benjamin have fallen in love, but when Benjamin discovers her true identity, he decides she was spying on the company and sadly breaks off their affair. At the last minute, Reeves straightens out everything, and the two companies ...

More Less

The Reeves Shoe Company and the Hartland Shoe Company have been friendly rivals ever since John Reeves and Tom Hartland fell in love with the same woman. Tom Hartland won her while John Reeves remained a bachelor, hiring his ambitious young nephew, Benjamin Burnett, as his general manager. After Tom Hartland dies, Reeves overhears Benjamin muse that he is slipping. Annoyed, he decides to go fishing in Maine and leave Benjamin to run the company without him, just to see how well he will do. In Maine, Reeves meets Jenny and Tommy Hartland, the two undisciplined children of his old rival. Disturbed by their careless lifestyle, Reeves pretends to be an old fisherman named John Walton and contrives to be taken to New York by the brother and sister. Once there, he sees that the Hartland factory is being mismanaged by Fred Pettison. He has himself appointed a trustee of the Hartland estate in order to force the Hartlands to take charge of their lives. Tommy starts to learn the business, and Jenny gets a job at the Reeves Company under an assumed name. Reeves helps Tommy run the business, making it successful again. After learning that Pettison is trying to sell the business to a syndicate at a profit for himself, Reeves fires him. Jenny and Benjamin have fallen in love, but when Benjamin discovers her true identity, he decides she was spying on the company and sadly breaks off their affair. At the last minute, Reeves straightens out everything, and the two companies merge.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.