Blessed Event (1932)

82-84 mins | Comedy-drama | 10 September 1932

Director:

Roy Del Ruth

Writer:

Howard J. Green

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Editor:

James Gibbon

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Contemporary sources note that the character of Alvin was based on columnist Walter Winchell. Modern sources note that Dick Powell made his screen debut in a featured role in this film, although some sources credit him with an appearance in the 1931 film Street Scene. Modern sources add the following cast credits: Lee Phelps (Hotel desk clerk). ...

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Contemporary sources note that the character of Alvin was based on columnist Walter Winchell. Modern sources note that Dick Powell made his screen debut in a featured role in this film, although some sources credit him with an appearance in the 1931 film Street Scene. Modern sources add the following cast credits: Lee Phelps (Hotel desk clerk).

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
23 Aug 1932
p. 9
Hollywood Reporter
19 Aug 1932
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 1932
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
10 Sep 1932
p. 38, 40
New York Times
3 Sep 1932
p. 16
Variety
6 Sep 1932
p. 15
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 September 1932
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 1 Sep 1932; New York premiere: 2 Sep 1931
Production Date:
ended late May 1932
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
7 September 1932
LP3234
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82-84
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

While his boss is on vacation, reporter Alvin Roberts has been writing a snappy gossip column featuring announcements of "blessed events," impending births of both the married and unmarried. Although the column is not very respectable, circulation jumps, so Alvin is assigned a regular position. Soon, he is so powerful that gangster Sam Goebel sends his gunman, Frankie Wells, to threaten him. Instead, Alvin tricks Frankie into confessing to murder and records it on his dictaphone. He warns Frankie that if someone kills him, Frankie will be executed painfully. Alvin's nemesis, singer Bunny Harmon, is opening a new nightclub and vows that Alvin will not be admitted, ever. Alvin, on the other hand, insists that he will be there no matter what. When singer Dorothy Lane begs Alvin, who has no scruples when it comes to his column, not to print the news that she is pregnant, he promises not to, but even though she is not married and will not name the baby's father, he runs the story, disregarding the harm it may do to her. Alvin is in love with Gladys Price, another reporter on the paper, who despises his column. When Alvin discovers that Goebel is Dorothy's lover and threatens to expose him, Goebel decides he must be killed. Frankie warns Alvin that Goebel's men will be looking for him at Bunny's nightclub. Gladys begs him not to go, but Alvin sneaks in through the back. Although Goebel's men shoot at him, Alvin is not harmed. Dorothy, however, shoots and kills Goebel. Later Alvin agrees to give up his column for Gladys, using his ...

More Less

While his boss is on vacation, reporter Alvin Roberts has been writing a snappy gossip column featuring announcements of "blessed events," impending births of both the married and unmarried. Although the column is not very respectable, circulation jumps, so Alvin is assigned a regular position. Soon, he is so powerful that gangster Sam Goebel sends his gunman, Frankie Wells, to threaten him. Instead, Alvin tricks Frankie into confessing to murder and records it on his dictaphone. He warns Frankie that if someone kills him, Frankie will be executed painfully. Alvin's nemesis, singer Bunny Harmon, is opening a new nightclub and vows that Alvin will not be admitted, ever. Alvin, on the other hand, insists that he will be there no matter what. When singer Dorothy Lane begs Alvin, who has no scruples when it comes to his column, not to print the news that she is pregnant, he promises not to, but even though she is not married and will not name the baby's father, he runs the story, disregarding the harm it may do to her. Alvin is in love with Gladys Price, another reporter on the paper, who despises his column. When Alvin discovers that Goebel is Dorothy's lover and threatens to expose him, Goebel decides he must be killed. Frankie warns Alvin that Goebel's men will be looking for him at Bunny's nightclub. Gladys begs him not to go, but Alvin sneaks in through the back. Although Goebel's men shoot at him, Alvin is not harmed. Dorothy, however, shoots and kills Goebel. Later Alvin agrees to give up his column for Gladys, using his last column to defend Dorothy and announce his engagement.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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