Don't Tell the Wife (1937)

62-63 mins | Comedy | 5 March 1937

Director:

Christy Cabanne

Writer:

Nat Perrin

Cinematographer:

Harry Wild

Editor:

Jack Hively

Production Designer:

Van Nest Polglase

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of the film was Once over Lightly . According to FD , Guy Kibbee replaced Fred Stone in the film's lead. RKO borrowed Kibbee from Warner Bros., Una Merkel from M-G-M and Lynne Overman from Paramount for the production. HR news items add Mary Gordon and Ted Thompson to the cast, but their participation in the final film has not been ... More Less

The working title of the film was Once over Lightly . According to FD , Guy Kibbee replaced Fred Stone in the film's lead. RKO borrowed Kibbee from Warner Bros., Una Merkel from M-G-M and Lynne Overman from Paramount for the production. HR news items add Mary Gordon and Ted Thompson to the cast, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 Jan 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
25 Nov 36
p. 14.
Film Daily
20 Feb 37
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 36
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Nov 36
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Dec 36
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Dec 37
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 37
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
21 Jan 37
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
27 Feb 37
p. 60.
New York Times
19 Feb 37
p. 15.
Variety
24 Feb 37
p. 15.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Once over Lightly
Release Date:
5 March 1937
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 18 February 1937
Production Date:
late November--mid December 1936
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
24 February 1937
Copyright Number:
LP6939
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62-63
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2915
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Immediately upon his release from prison, confidence artist Major Manning recruits his cohorts for a stock market scam involving a gold mine he had won gambling with a rich cellmate. Sure that the new scheme is arrest-proof, Manning then talks former gang member Steven Dorsey, who has "retired" to the country with his wife Nancy, into joining the operation. To secure the necessary capital, Dorsey tries to convince Nancy that the deal is legal and worthy of a $50,000 loan from their joint bank account by claiming that "Wall Street Winthrop" has endorsed the stock. Ever suspicious, Nancy insists upon meeting "Winthrop," thus forcing Steven to comb the city for a willing dupe named Winthrop. Eventually the gang produces Malcolm J. Winthrop, the wide-eyed financial editor of a Yonkers newspaper, whom they "hire" as the president of their new company, "The House of Winthrop Investments." Convinced by Malcolm, Nancy gives Steven the money, and veteran solicitors begin selling the "Golden Dream" stock over the telephone. To keep Malcolm busy, Steven encourages him to sell the stock to his Yonkers' friends, but forgets to tell him not to put any promises in writing. When one of the friends to whom Malcolm has written then contacts Inspector Mallory about a possible fraud, Mallory demands to see Malcolm. Although Steven tries to keep Malcolm away from Mallory, Malcolm discovers the gang's plot and, with a furious Nancy, threatens to confess all to the police. On the way to police headquarters, however, Malcolm, sensing Nancy's love for her incorrigible mate, decides to fly to New Mexico to inspect the mine. When Malcolm learns that the ... +


Immediately upon his release from prison, confidence artist Major Manning recruits his cohorts for a stock market scam involving a gold mine he had won gambling with a rich cellmate. Sure that the new scheme is arrest-proof, Manning then talks former gang member Steven Dorsey, who has "retired" to the country with his wife Nancy, into joining the operation. To secure the necessary capital, Dorsey tries to convince Nancy that the deal is legal and worthy of a $50,000 loan from their joint bank account by claiming that "Wall Street Winthrop" has endorsed the stock. Ever suspicious, Nancy insists upon meeting "Winthrop," thus forcing Steven to comb the city for a willing dupe named Winthrop. Eventually the gang produces Malcolm J. Winthrop, the wide-eyed financial editor of a Yonkers newspaper, whom they "hire" as the president of their new company, "The House of Winthrop Investments." Convinced by Malcolm, Nancy gives Steven the money, and veteran solicitors begin selling the "Golden Dream" stock over the telephone. To keep Malcolm busy, Steven encourages him to sell the stock to his Yonkers' friends, but forgets to tell him not to put any promises in writing. When one of the friends to whom Malcolm has written then contacts Inspector Mallory about a possible fraud, Mallory demands to see Malcolm. Although Steven tries to keep Malcolm away from Mallory, Malcolm discovers the gang's plot and, with a furious Nancy, threatens to confess all to the police. On the way to police headquarters, however, Malcolm, sensing Nancy's love for her incorrigible mate, decides to fly to New Mexico to inspect the mine. When Malcolm learns that the mine actually is brimming with gold, he returns to New York and uses Nancy's money to buy shares through reputable stockbrokers. In the meantime, Cupid, a dim-witted gang member, sells Inspector Mallory 200 shares of the stock and promises him in writing that they will "go to ten" in a week. To save themselves, the gang desperately starts buying back all of the previously sold shares, hoping to drive the price up, but discover too late that Nancy's money is gone. As Nancy prepares to leave Steven for Europe, Malcolm shows up and reveals the truth about Golden Dream. Reformed, Steven then rushes to stop now rich Nancy at the dock. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.