The Gang's All Here (1943)

103 mins | Musical | 24 December 1943

Director:

Busby Berkeley

Writer:

Walter Bullock

Producer:

William LeBaron

Cinematographer:

Edward Cronjager

Editor:

Ray Curtiss

Production Designers:

James Basevi, Joseph C. Wright

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Girls He Left Behind . According to a 7 Jan 1943 news item, composer Harry Warren was originally scheduled to work with lyricist Mack Gordon on the film's score, but Warren instead wrote the picture's songs with Leo Robin. A 30 Mar 1943 HR news item included "Pickin' on Your Momma" in the list of songs to be featured in the film. Modern sources note that the song, along with "Sleepy Moon" and "Drums and Dreams" were cut before the final release. According to HR news items and a studio press release, Linda Darnell was originally scheduled to play "Vivian Potter," which would have been her first dancing role in motion pictures. During dance rehearsals, however, Darnell sprained her ankle, and after her recovery, eloped with cinematographer Peverell Marley and asked Twentieth Century-Fox for an indefinite leave of absence. Darnell was replaced in the role by Sheila Ryan.
       Although Alice Faye did have a singing cameo in the 1944 film Four Jills and a Jeep (see above), this picture marked her last appearance in a musical film until the 1962 version of State Fair . Faye, who was pregnant with her second child during filming of The Gang's All Here , retired from the screen and only made one additional film, the 1945 drama Fallen Angel (see above) until 1962. The Gang's All Here marked the screen debuts of actresses June Haver (1926--2005), Jeanne Crain and Jo Carroll Dennison, who was Miss America of 1942. According to a 1944 LAT ... More Less

The working title of this film was The Girls He Left Behind . According to a 7 Jan 1943 news item, composer Harry Warren was originally scheduled to work with lyricist Mack Gordon on the film's score, but Warren instead wrote the picture's songs with Leo Robin. A 30 Mar 1943 HR news item included "Pickin' on Your Momma" in the list of songs to be featured in the film. Modern sources note that the song, along with "Sleepy Moon" and "Drums and Dreams" were cut before the final release. According to HR news items and a studio press release, Linda Darnell was originally scheduled to play "Vivian Potter," which would have been her first dancing role in motion pictures. During dance rehearsals, however, Darnell sprained her ankle, and after her recovery, eloped with cinematographer Peverell Marley and asked Twentieth Century-Fox for an indefinite leave of absence. Darnell was replaced in the role by Sheila Ryan.
       Although Alice Faye did have a singing cameo in the 1944 film Four Jills and a Jeep (see above), this picture marked her last appearance in a musical film until the 1962 version of State Fair . Faye, who was pregnant with her second child during filming of The Gang's All Here , retired from the screen and only made one additional film, the 1945 drama Fallen Angel (see above) until 1962. The Gang's All Here marked the screen debuts of actresses June Haver (1926--2005), Jeanne Crain and Jo Carroll Dennison, who was Miss America of 1942. According to a 1944 LAT article, the film was to include a take-off on Phil Baker's popular radio show, "Take It or Leave It." The sequence was cut, and Baker instead made an entire film based on the show, called Take It or Leave It , for Twentieth Century-Fox (see below). Director Busby Berkeley was borrowed from M-G-M for The Gang's All Here , although by the time additional scenes were shot in late Sep 1943, M-G-M had assigned his contract to Warner Bros.
       The Gang's All Here was the first color film directed by Berkeley (although he did do the choreography for the 1930 two-strip Technicolor film Whoopee ), and the extravagant production numbers were well received. While praising Berkeley's work, the MPH reviewer commented that the production numbers "are opulent in highly effective color combinations and are climaxed by a finale in the cubistic and modernistic tempo which is different from anything that has passed this reviewer's way since some of the abstract treatments employed by Walt Disney's Fantasia ." Although some modern sources indicate that the film was banned in Brazil because of the giant bananas featured in "The Lady with Tutti-Frutti Hat" number, the film's file in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library contained no information about censorship in Brazil and the film was approved for export to South American countries. The picture received an Academy Award nomination in the Art Direction (Color) category. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
11 Dec 1943.
---
Daily Variety
26 Nov 43
p. 3, 11
Film Daily
29 Nov 43
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jan 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 43
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Feb 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 43
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Mar 43
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Apr 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 43
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Apr 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 43
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jun 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 43
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Aug 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Sep 43
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Dec 43
p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
2 Apr 1944.
---
Motion Picture Daily
29 Nov 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald
27 Nov 43
p. 70.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
4 Dec 43
p. 1653.
New York Times
16 May 1943.
---
New York Times
23 Dec 43
p. 26.
Variety
1 Dec 43
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
William Goetz in charge of production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Based on a story by
Based on a story by
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Assoc
Props
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Dances created and dir by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"No Love, No Nothing," "A Journey to a Star," "The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat," "The Polka Dot Polka," "You Discover You're in New York," "Paducah" and "Minnie's in the Money," music and lyrics by Leo Robin and Harry Warren
"Brazil," music by Ary Barroso, English lyrics by S. K. Russell.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Girls He Left Behind
Release Date:
24 December 1943
Production Date:
25 April--mid August 1943
retakes late September 1943
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
24 December 1943
Copyright Number:
LP12471
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
103
Length(in feet):
9,288
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9351
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Wealthy businessman Andrew J. "A. J." Mason, Sr. takes his nervous partner, Peyton Potter, to the Club New Yorker for a celebratory evening with his son, Sgt. Andrew J. Mason, Jr., who is about to report for active duty in the Army. A. J. and Andy enjoy the show, which features master of ceremonies Phil Baker and dancer Tony De Marco, while Potter worries about what his wife Blossom would say if she knew he was there. While Potter is trapped into dancing with Brazilian sensation Dorita, Andy becomes intrigued by entertainer Eadie Allen. Phil warns Andy that because Eadie dances at the Broadway Canteen between shows, she will not go out on a date with him, but Andy follows her to the canteen and tells her that his name is Sgt. Pat Casey so that she will not be intimidated by his wealth. Despite her insistence that she cannot date servicemen outside the canteen, Eadie is charmed by Andy and agrees to meet him later when he pursues her to the nightclub. Eadie and Andy spend the evening talking and falling in love, and the next day, Eadie bids him farewell at the train station and promises to write every day. Andy distinguishes himself in battle in the South Pacific, and is granted a furlough after being awarded a medal. A. J. is thrilled and plans to throw a welcome home party for Andy at the Club New Yorker. Phil cannot accommodate his plans, however, as the club is closed for two weeks while the company rehearses a new show. Munificent as always, A. J. invites the performers to rehearse ... +


Wealthy businessman Andrew J. "A. J." Mason, Sr. takes his nervous partner, Peyton Potter, to the Club New Yorker for a celebratory evening with his son, Sgt. Andrew J. Mason, Jr., who is about to report for active duty in the Army. A. J. and Andy enjoy the show, which features master of ceremonies Phil Baker and dancer Tony De Marco, while Potter worries about what his wife Blossom would say if she knew he was there. While Potter is trapped into dancing with Brazilian sensation Dorita, Andy becomes intrigued by entertainer Eadie Allen. Phil warns Andy that because Eadie dances at the Broadway Canteen between shows, she will not go out on a date with him, but Andy follows her to the canteen and tells her that his name is Sgt. Pat Casey so that she will not be intimidated by his wealth. Despite her insistence that she cannot date servicemen outside the canteen, Eadie is charmed by Andy and agrees to meet him later when he pursues her to the nightclub. Eadie and Andy spend the evening talking and falling in love, and the next day, Eadie bids him farewell at the train station and promises to write every day. Andy distinguishes himself in battle in the South Pacific, and is granted a furlough after being awarded a medal. A. J. is thrilled and plans to throw a welcome home party for Andy at the Club New Yorker. Phil cannot accommodate his plans, however, as the club is closed for two weeks while the company rehearses a new show. Munificent as always, A. J. invites the performers to rehearse at his and Potter's homes, where they can throw a lavish garden party and war bond rally to welcome Andy. Potter is perturbed about the arrangements when he learns that Blossom knows Phil from her former days as an entertainer, and his chagrin grows when Tony's partner cannot perform and he asks Potter's daughter Vivian to dance with him. Hoping to persuade the stodgy Potter to allow Vivian to perform, Blossom tells him that Phil has threatened to reveal her wild past if Vivian is not in the show. Potter acquiesces, but his problems grow when he is pursued by the romantic-minded Dorita. When not chasing Potter, Dorita learns that Vivian has a boyfriend named Andy, and that he and Eadie's "Casey" are the same man. Complications arise as Dorita tries to keep Vivian and Eadie from discovering Andy's deception. When Andy and the real Pat Casey arrive at the club, however, Eadie learns the truth. Andy proclaims that he wants to marry her and not Vivian, but Eadie insists on breaking off their relationship, as she believes that Vivian really cares for him. During the show, however, Vivian tells Eadie that she is going to Broadway to perform as Tony's permanent partner, and reveals that she and Andy were never truly in love. As the show comes to a close, Eadie and Andy reconcile, and everyone joins in the final song. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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