Before Morning (1933)

56 mins | Drama | 1933

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HISTORY

Louise Prussing, Louis Jean Heydt and Jules Epailly played the same roles in the Broadway production of the play. Reviewers note that the whole film was shot in four interior ... More Less

Louise Prussing, Louis Jean Heydt and Jules Epailly played the same roles in the Broadway production of the play. Reviewers note that the whole film was shot in four interior settings. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
3 May 33
p. 2.
Film Daily
19 Oct 33
p. 6.
The Exhibitor
10 Sep 33
p. 6.
Variety
21 Nov 33
p. 37.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
From the great Broadway Stage success by Edna and Edward P. Riley
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
Sd tech
Sd tech
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Before Morning by Edna and Edward R. Riley (New York, 9 Feb 1933).
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 18 November 1933
Production Date:
8 May--ended mid September 1933 at Atlas Soundfilm Recording Studios, New York City
Physical Properties:
Sound
Cineglow Sound System at Atlas Sound Studios
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
56
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Elsie Manning, an actress, tells her friend, theatrical producer Neil Kennedy, that she is leaving the stage to marry Horace Barker. Later that evening, her lover, James Nichols, returns to town from a business trip, and Elsie ends her relationship with him. They part amicably, but as Jim gets up to leave, he feels faint. He tells Elsie that his wife refused to grant him a divorce. While he takes a capsule for his dizziness, Elsie is called to the phone to speak to her young daughter Norma, who is in the hospital. When she returns, Jim is dead. Elsie phones her friend, Leo Bergman, who comes to her aid with Dr. Gruelle, the owner of a sanitarium. In order to avoid a scandal, Gruelle agrees to pretend that Jim died at the sanitarium, rather than in Elsie's apartment. As they are making the arrangements, Horace returns to Elsie's apartment, and he is outraged when he hears about her relationship with Jim. He relents, however, and insists that no matter what, he still wants to marry her. Later, Gruelle tells Elsie that Jim was poisoned and did not die of a heart attack. Noting that she was named in his will, he asks for part of the $200,000 Jim left her in order to keep quiet. Elsie denies killing Jim and suggests that he might have been poisoned when he took his medicine. Gruelle then summons Jim's wife. While Elsie waits in another room, Gruelle tells Mrs. Nichols that her husband is dead and makes her the same proposal he made Elsie. Mrs. Nichols agrees to the ... +


Elsie Manning, an actress, tells her friend, theatrical producer Neil Kennedy, that she is leaving the stage to marry Horace Barker. Later that evening, her lover, James Nichols, returns to town from a business trip, and Elsie ends her relationship with him. They part amicably, but as Jim gets up to leave, he feels faint. He tells Elsie that his wife refused to grant him a divorce. While he takes a capsule for his dizziness, Elsie is called to the phone to speak to her young daughter Norma, who is in the hospital. When she returns, Jim is dead. Elsie phones her friend, Leo Bergman, who comes to her aid with Dr. Gruelle, the owner of a sanitarium. In order to avoid a scandal, Gruelle agrees to pretend that Jim died at the sanitarium, rather than in Elsie's apartment. As they are making the arrangements, Horace returns to Elsie's apartment, and he is outraged when he hears about her relationship with Jim. He relents, however, and insists that no matter what, he still wants to marry her. Later, Gruelle tells Elsie that Jim was poisoned and did not die of a heart attack. Noting that she was named in his will, he asks for part of the $200,000 Jim left her in order to keep quiet. Elsie denies killing Jim and suggests that he might have been poisoned when he took his medicine. Gruelle then summons Jim's wife. While Elsie waits in another room, Gruelle tells Mrs. Nichols that her husband is dead and makes her the same proposal he made Elsie. Mrs. Nichols agrees to the plan, but Elsie bursts into the room and refuses to cover up the murder. She intends to use Jim's medicine as proof of Mrs. Nichols' crime, but she can't find the bottle where Jim left it. After realizing that Mrs. Nichols has been alone in the bedroom, Elsie discovers the bottle in her purse. Mrs. Nichols then offers Gruelle more money to cover up the murder. Just then Horace, Leo and Neil arrive and reveal Gruelle to be Mr. Maitland, a police inspector. When she hears the news, Mrs. Nichols tries to jump off the balcony. Gruelle arrests Mrs. Nichols, and Horace and Elsie kiss to seal their engagement. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.