Employee's Entrance (1933)

74-75 mins | Drama | 11 February 1933

Director:

Roy Del Ruth

Producer:

Lucien Hubbard

Cinematographer:

Barney McGill

Editor:

James Gibbon

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

First National Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

FD notes that Hale Hamilton replaced Walter Walker. According to Warner Bros. production reports in the AMPAS files, the film took twenty-three days to shoot and was made for a total cost of $188,000. Some contemporary sources credit the actor playing "The man" as either Frank or Sam Godfrey and credit both Henry Stockbridge and H. C. Bradley as "Meek." Modern sources add Muriel Gordon to the ... More Less

FD notes that Hale Hamilton replaced Walter Walker. According to Warner Bros. production reports in the AMPAS files, the film took twenty-three days to shoot and was made for a total cost of $188,000. Some contemporary sources credit the actor playing "The man" as either Frank or Sam Godfrey and credit both Henry Stockbridge and H. C. Bradley as "Meek." Modern sources add Muriel Gordon to the cast. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
21 Jan 33
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
24 Dec 32
p. 24.
New York Times
21 Jan 33
p. 10.
Variety
24 Jan 33
p. 12.
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 February 1933
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 20 January 1933
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
30 January 1933
Copyright Number:
LP3607
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
74-75
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Kurt Anderson is the dictatorial general manager of the Franklin Monroe Department Store. His ruthless devotion to the philosophy of profit over people makes him hated by all, but the store does well financially. One evening after closing, he meets Madeline Walters, a beautiful young woman who wants a job. They spend the night together and he hires her as a model. She starts to date Martin West, a successsful salesman. Anderson likes Martin's ideas for improving Depression-plagued sales and appoints him his assistant, but warns him that it is no job for a married man. Anderson is so cynical about women that he doubles the salary of another model, Polly Dale, to distract his boss, Denton Ross, who is infatuated with Polly, and keep him from interfering in the business. Despite Anderson's warnings, Martin and Madeline secretly marry, but their relationship suffers because Martin is always at Anderson's beck and call. After they quarrel at the employees' dance, Martin gets drunk and Madeline spends another night with Anderson. When Anderson asks her out again, she refuses and reveals that she is secretly married. Anderson is furious and tries to force Polly to break up the marriage. When she refuses, Anderson tries to fire her, but Ross is so enamoured, he blocks the attempt. As a last resort, Anderson lets Martin overhear a conversation with Madeline in which the story of their affair comes out. Madeline takes poison and Martin confronts Anderson. Anderson is about to be fired by the store's board of directors, but is saved by some last minute proxy votes. Martin and Madeline reconcile and decide ... +


Kurt Anderson is the dictatorial general manager of the Franklin Monroe Department Store. His ruthless devotion to the philosophy of profit over people makes him hated by all, but the store does well financially. One evening after closing, he meets Madeline Walters, a beautiful young woman who wants a job. They spend the night together and he hires her as a model. She starts to date Martin West, a successsful salesman. Anderson likes Martin's ideas for improving Depression-plagued sales and appoints him his assistant, but warns him that it is no job for a married man. Anderson is so cynical about women that he doubles the salary of another model, Polly Dale, to distract his boss, Denton Ross, who is infatuated with Polly, and keep him from interfering in the business. Despite Anderson's warnings, Martin and Madeline secretly marry, but their relationship suffers because Martin is always at Anderson's beck and call. After they quarrel at the employees' dance, Martin gets drunk and Madeline spends another night with Anderson. When Anderson asks her out again, she refuses and reveals that she is secretly married. Anderson is furious and tries to force Polly to break up the marriage. When she refuses, Anderson tries to fire her, but Ross is so enamoured, he blocks the attempt. As a last resort, Anderson lets Martin overhear a conversation with Madeline in which the story of their affair comes out. Madeline takes poison and Martin confronts Anderson. Anderson is about to be fired by the store's board of directors, but is saved by some last minute proxy votes. Martin and Madeline reconcile and decide to look for new jobs away from the Monroe Department Store. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.