Hold That Co-Ed (1938)

80 mins | Comedy | 16 September 1938

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HISTORY

While screen credits list Donald Meek's character name as "Dean Fletcher," the film's dialogue and a dialogue continuity in the copyright descriptions call the character "Thatcher." According to a MPH news item printed before the film's shooting was completed, the music and lyrics were to be provided by Walter Bullock and Harold Spina, in addition to Lew Brown and Lew Pollack. It is unclear if this was simply an erroneous statement, or whether Bullock and Spina did write a song or songs which were not included in the film. According to Jule Styne's autobiography, when composer Pollack died suddenly, Pollack's lyric writer, Sidney Clare, needed music in a hurry, so studio head Darryl Zanuck assigned Styne to the film, and he wrote the music for the song "Limpy Dimp." The credits of this film appear on a revolving football. According to a HR news item, George Murphy was loaned from M-G-M. A HR news item from Apr 1938 noted that associate producer David Hempstead was preparing the production of a story with the "Huey Long--LSU situation as a background." MPH , in their review, commented, "The story might be called a burlesque of the late Huey Long's career," while Var stated, "Plot is said to have some foundation in the saga of Huey Long, the Louisiana politico." The film includes a new novelty dance entitled the "Limpy Dimp." Some reviews compared this film to Twentieth Century-Fox's first football musical, Pigskin Parade (see below), and a HR news item stated that this film was the third of a series of football ... More Less

While screen credits list Donald Meek's character name as "Dean Fletcher," the film's dialogue and a dialogue continuity in the copyright descriptions call the character "Thatcher." According to a MPH news item printed before the film's shooting was completed, the music and lyrics were to be provided by Walter Bullock and Harold Spina, in addition to Lew Brown and Lew Pollack. It is unclear if this was simply an erroneous statement, or whether Bullock and Spina did write a song or songs which were not included in the film. According to Jule Styne's autobiography, when composer Pollack died suddenly, Pollack's lyric writer, Sidney Clare, needed music in a hurry, so studio head Darryl Zanuck assigned Styne to the film, and he wrote the music for the song "Limpy Dimp." The credits of this film appear on a revolving football. According to a HR news item, George Murphy was loaned from M-G-M. A HR news item from Apr 1938 noted that associate producer David Hempstead was preparing the production of a story with the "Huey Long--LSU situation as a background." MPH , in their review, commented, "The story might be called a burlesque of the late Huey Long's career," while Var stated, "Plot is said to have some foundation in the saga of Huey Long, the Louisiana politico." The film includes a new novelty dance entitled the "Limpy Dimp." Some reviews compared this film to Twentieth Century-Fox's first football musical, Pigskin Parade (see below), and a HR news item stated that this film was the third of a series of football musicals. Glenn Morris, who appeared as one of the football players, was a former Olympic decathalon champion. According to a modern source, John Barrymore's wife Elaine was to be in the film, but her scene or scenes were cut. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Sep 1938.
---
Daily Variety
9 Sep 38
p. 3.
Film Daily
16 Sep 38
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 38
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Apr 38
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 38
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 38
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 38
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 38
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Sep 38
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
9 Sep 38
p. 17.
Motion Picture Herald
23 Jul 38
p. 47.
Motion Picture Herald
17 Sep 38
p. 40.
New York Times
24 Sep 38
p. 13.
Variety
28 Sep 38
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Darryl F. Zanuck in charge of production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Dances staged by
Dances staged by
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to prod
SOURCES
SONGS
"Hold That Co-Ed" and "Here I Am Doing It," music and lyrics by Mack Gordon and Harry Revel
"Heads High," music and lyrics by Lew Pollack and Lew Brown
"Limpy Dimp," music and lyrics by Sidney Clare, Jule Styne and Nicholas Castle.
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 September 1938
Production Date:
mid June--early August 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
16 September 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8521
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80
Length(in feet):
7,197
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4447
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Rusty Stevens, former All-American quarterback for the prestigious midwestern Clayton University football team, returns to the school thinking that he has been hired as their coach. He discovers, however, that he has been signed to coach at State College, the run-down public institution in the same town. Upon learning that the team has only one football and no other equipment because Governor Gabby Harrigan, who is running for U.S. Senator, has cut their budget as a campaign stunt, Rusty leads a group of students to the state capitol to protest. The governor's refusal to meet with the students leads to a brawl with police. Advisors to Harrigan's opponent, the meek Republic candidate, Major Hubert Breckenridge, encourage him to take advantage of the incident and in a forthcoming speech to proclaim himself an advocate for education. However, to beat his opponent to the punch, Harrigan promises to increase expenditures to make State the greatest college in the country. When his secretary, Marjorie Blake, who has become attracted to Rusty, suggests that Harrigan could take advantage of the large crowds attracted to football games, Harrigan calls for a stadium to be built that will hold 100,000, to be called the "Gabby Bowl," and intimidates local businessmen to arrange for their illustrious alma maters to play there. At the stadium's groundbreaking, after Harrigan is hit in the head by a football kicked by Lizzie Olsen, the daughter of a famous football coach, he insists, for publicity purposes, that Lizzie be allowed to play on the team and thus become the game's first woman player. Lizzie kicks the tying point in State's first game against a good ... +


Rusty Stevens, former All-American quarterback for the prestigious midwestern Clayton University football team, returns to the school thinking that he has been hired as their coach. He discovers, however, that he has been signed to coach at State College, the run-down public institution in the same town. Upon learning that the team has only one football and no other equipment because Governor Gabby Harrigan, who is running for U.S. Senator, has cut their budget as a campaign stunt, Rusty leads a group of students to the state capitol to protest. The governor's refusal to meet with the students leads to a brawl with police. Advisors to Harrigan's opponent, the meek Republic candidate, Major Hubert Breckenridge, encourage him to take advantage of the incident and in a forthcoming speech to proclaim himself an advocate for education. However, to beat his opponent to the punch, Harrigan promises to increase expenditures to make State the greatest college in the country. When his secretary, Marjorie Blake, who has become attracted to Rusty, suggests that Harrigan could take advantage of the large crowds attracted to football games, Harrigan calls for a stadium to be built that will hold 100,000, to be called the "Gabby Bowl," and intimidates local businessmen to arrange for their illustrious alma maters to play there. At the stadium's groundbreaking, after Harrigan is hit in the head by a football kicked by Lizzie Olsen, the daughter of a famous football coach, he insists, for publicity purposes, that Lizzie be allowed to play on the team and thus become the game's first woman player. Lizzie kicks the tying point in State's first game against a good team, Louisiana, but to insure victory in their next game, Harrigan demands that the team gets seasoned players. Lizzie takes Harrigan's assistant, Wilbur Peters, to whom she has taken a fancy, to meet wrestlers Steve and Mike Wurgerski, former students who quit because they were broke, and during their match, Wilbur offers them phony government jobs paying $500 a month to play for State. With the Wurgerskis, State tramples their opponents. After Breckenridge's advisors convince him to adopt similar tactics and support Clayton, the campaign receives nationwide attention as issues are forgotten. When Breckenridge refuses Harrigan's challenge to have Clayton play State, Harrigan, on a radio broadcast, calls Breckenridge "yellow" and offers to withdraw from the race if State loses to Clayton, providing Breckenridge will do the same if Clayton loses. After Breckenridge is forced to accept, Rusty learns that the Wurgerskis are being paid, and because professionals cannot play on college teams, they are fired. During the game, State struggles and sustains many injuries, and as it nears the end, the score is 7-6 in Clayton's favor. After Lizzie misses a field goal because of a fierce wind, and Rusty has no more players to replace those injured, Harrigan suggests that Lizzie be allowed to remain. On the last play of the game, Lizzie catches a ball batted down by an opponent and fights the now torrential wind to finally, with Wilbur's encouragement, fall over the goal line and win the game. Rusty kisses Marjorie, and Harrigan, after promising to perform their wedding ceremony, wonders, over the radio, what kind of team the president has. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Football, Political, College


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.