Wyoming (1940)

89 mins | Western | 13 September 1940

Director:

Richard Thorpe

Producer:

Milton H. Bren

Cinematographer:

Clyde De Vinna

Editor:

Robert J. Kern

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Bad Man from Wyoming. According to a news item in HR, it was filmed on location around Jackson Hole, WY, and the Teton Range. ...

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The working title of this film was Bad Man from Wyoming. According to a news item in HR, it was filmed on location around Jackson Hole, WY, and the Teton Range.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Sep 1940
p. 3
Film Daily
10 Sep 1940
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
27 May 1940
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 1940
pp. 6-7
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 1940
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 1940
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
6 Sep 1940
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
10 Sep 1940
p. 7
Motion Picture Herald
14 Sep 1940
p. 34
New York Times
3 Oct 1940
p. 31
Variety
11 Sep 1940
p. 14
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Milton Bren
Prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Women's cost
Men's cost
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
MAKEUP
Makeup created by
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Bad Man from Wyoming
Release Date:
13 September 1940
Production Date:
early Jun--29 Jul 1940
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Loew's Inc.
11 September 1940
LP9920
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
sepia
Duration(in mins):
89
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6512
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

"Reb" Harkness and Pete Marillo are in the process of robbing a train in Missouri when the cavalry closes in on them. After escaping on Reb's horse, Pete double-crosses his partner and steals the animal, leaving Reb to face the soldiers on foot. Deciding to escape his pursuers by traveling to California, Reb meets Dave Kincaid, a discharged Confederate soldier, who invites him to ride along to his ranch in Wyoming. As they near the ranch, Reb steals Kincaid's horse and pack, but after Kincaid is murdered by cattle rustlers, Reb rides to the ranch to care for the slain man's daughter Lucy and son Jimmy. There Reb learns that the town's corrupt mayor, John Buckley, is forcing the ranchers from their lands, but Reb wants none of their fight. After killing one of Buckley's men for gunning down Kincaid, and delivering the dead man's money to Jimmy and Lucy, Reb plans to ride on to California, but his plans are postponed with the arrival of General George Custer, who has come to police the territory. When Buckley accuses Reb of murdering one of his men, Custer arrests him and places him in the custody of the town's weak-willed sheriff, who is also Buckley's tool. Plotting to rustle the remainder of the rancher's cattle, Buckley arranges for a diversion to compel Custer to go to Laramie. He then sets a trap for Reb, but Reb outwits him, escapes, and meets up with Pete again, who decides to help him. Upon learning that Buckley's men have killed Lafe, the brother of the town's female blacksmith, Mehitabel, Reb sides with the ranchers, but before a range ...

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"Reb" Harkness and Pete Marillo are in the process of robbing a train in Missouri when the cavalry closes in on them. After escaping on Reb's horse, Pete double-crosses his partner and steals the animal, leaving Reb to face the soldiers on foot. Deciding to escape his pursuers by traveling to California, Reb meets Dave Kincaid, a discharged Confederate soldier, who invites him to ride along to his ranch in Wyoming. As they near the ranch, Reb steals Kincaid's horse and pack, but after Kincaid is murdered by cattle rustlers, Reb rides to the ranch to care for the slain man's daughter Lucy and son Jimmy. There Reb learns that the town's corrupt mayor, John Buckley, is forcing the ranchers from their lands, but Reb wants none of their fight. After killing one of Buckley's men for gunning down Kincaid, and delivering the dead man's money to Jimmy and Lucy, Reb plans to ride on to California, but his plans are postponed with the arrival of General George Custer, who has come to police the territory. When Buckley accuses Reb of murdering one of his men, Custer arrests him and places him in the custody of the town's weak-willed sheriff, who is also Buckley's tool. Plotting to rustle the remainder of the rancher's cattle, Buckley arranges for a diversion to compel Custer to go to Laramie. He then sets a trap for Reb, but Reb outwits him, escapes, and meets up with Pete again, who decides to help him. Upon learning that Buckley's men have killed Lafe, the brother of the town's female blacksmith, Mehitabel, Reb sides with the ranchers, but before a range war can escalate, Custer returns and declares martial law. Not to be deterred, Buckley arranges for an Indian massacre, but before he can benefit from his treachery, Reb shoots and kills him. After Reb and Custer's cavalry fend off the Indian attack, Reb decides to give up on California and settle down in Wyoming with Mehitabel, while Lucy and Sergeant Connelly, one of Custer's men, make plans of their own.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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