The Bank Dick (1940)

73-74 mins | Comedy | 29 November 1940

Director:

Edward F. Cline

Writer:

W. C. Fields

Cinematographer:

Milton Krasner

Editor:

Arthur Hilton

Production Designer:

Jack Otterson

Production Company:

Universal Pictures Co.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working titles of this film were The Great Man and The Bank Detective. The name of screenwriter "Mahatma Kane Jeeves" was a pseudonym for W. C. Fields, and makes humorous reference to the character Jeeves the butler created by novelist P. G. Wodehouse. According to modern sources, Jack Gross was the film's supervisor. ...

More Less

The working titles of this film were The Great Man and The Bank Detective. The name of screenwriter "Mahatma Kane Jeeves" was a pseudonym for W. C. Fields, and makes humorous reference to the character Jeeves the butler created by novelist P. G. Wodehouse. According to modern sources, Jack Gross was the film's supervisor.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Nov 1940
p. 3
Film Daily
3 Dec 1940
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jun 1940
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
5 Sep 1940
pp. 14-15
Hollywood Reporter
29 Nov 1940
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
3 Dec 1940
p. 6
Motion Picture Herald
7 Dec 1940
p. 43
New York Times
13 Dec 1940
p. 29
Variety
4 Dec 1940
p. 12
Variety
12 Dec 1940
p. 12
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Edward Cline
Dir
Collaborating dir
Asst dir
WRITERS
Mahatma Kane Jeeves
Orig scr, Orig scr
Richard Carroll
Dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Richard Riedel
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
R. A. Gausman
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Bank Detective
The Great Man
Release Date:
29 November 1940
Production Date:
began early Sep 1940
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal Pictures Co.
29 November 1940
LP10080
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
73-74
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
6824
SYNOPSIS

Egbert Sousé, a man who tries his best to live up to his name, supports his family by entering puzzle and slogan contests until one day, he unwittingly captures a bank robber when the bench on which he is seated topples over on the thief. For his act of bravery, Sousé is heralded as a hero and awarded the job of bank detective by Mr. Skinner, the bank president. Sousé's good fortune attracts the attention of J. Frothingham Waterbury, a swindler who sells Sousé phony stock in the Beefsteak Mining Company. Falling for Waterbury's line, Sousé convinces Og Oggilby, his future son-in-law and fellow bank employee, to withdraw an "advance" on his bonus and invest in Beefsteak shares. When the unexpected appearance of bank examiner J. Pinkerton Snoopington threatens to expose Og as an embezzler, Sousé tries to delay the examiner until Og's bonus arrives. Sousé tries to stop Snoopington by poisoning him, but his attempt fails, and the ill examiner shows up at the bank to audit the books. At that moment, the Beefsteak mine comes in, making Og a very rich man, and the bank is held up again. The robbers force Sousé at gunpoint to drive the escape car, but after an arduous chase, the car falls apart and Sousé is once again credited with the capture of the thief. Sousé's reward for the thief's capture, together with the profits from the mine, catapult Sousé into the position of one of the town's wealthiest citizens, and all ends ...

More Less

Egbert Sousé, a man who tries his best to live up to his name, supports his family by entering puzzle and slogan contests until one day, he unwittingly captures a bank robber when the bench on which he is seated topples over on the thief. For his act of bravery, Sousé is heralded as a hero and awarded the job of bank detective by Mr. Skinner, the bank president. Sousé's good fortune attracts the attention of J. Frothingham Waterbury, a swindler who sells Sousé phony stock in the Beefsteak Mining Company. Falling for Waterbury's line, Sousé convinces Og Oggilby, his future son-in-law and fellow bank employee, to withdraw an "advance" on his bonus and invest in Beefsteak shares. When the unexpected appearance of bank examiner J. Pinkerton Snoopington threatens to expose Og as an embezzler, Sousé tries to delay the examiner until Og's bonus arrives. Sousé tries to stop Snoopington by poisoning him, but his attempt fails, and the ill examiner shows up at the bank to audit the books. At that moment, the Beefsteak mine comes in, making Og a very rich man, and the bank is held up again. The robbers force Sousé at gunpoint to drive the escape car, but after an arduous chase, the car falls apart and Sousé is once again credited with the capture of the thief. Sousé's reward for the thief's capture, together with the profits from the mine, catapult Sousé into the position of one of the town's wealthiest citizens, and all ends happily.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Down Three Dark Streets

The film's working title was Case File: FBI . The Gordons was a joint name under which husband and wife Gordon and Mildred Gordon wrote the novel on ... >>

Psycho

Actor Vaughn Taylor's surname is misspelled "Tayler" in the onscreen credits. Several Jun and Jul 1959 HR news items erroneously refer to the film as Psyche. ... >>

Pinocchio

According to material contained in the production file for this film at the AMPAS Library, the original Carlo Collodi story was written in installments for an Italian weekly magazine. ... >>

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

Although onscreen credits note that the film was adapted from "Grimms' Fairy Tales," only "Schneewittchen" has been identified as a literary source. "Schneewittchen" was first translated into English ... >>

The Wizard of Oz

The following dedication appears in the opening credits: “For nearly forty years this story has given faithful service to the Young in Heart; and Time has been powerless to ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.