5th Avenue Girl (1939)

82-83 mins | Drama | 22 September 1939

Full page view
HISTORY

The working titles of the film were My Fifth Avenue Girl and The Other Half . Although some contemporary and modern sources list the title as Fifth Avenue Girl , the film's opening title card reads "5th Avenue Girl . Materials contained in the RKO Production Files at the UCLA Theater Arts Library note that the picture finished shooting twelve days ahead of schedule. Louis Calhern was originally cast as "Tommy Hopkins," according to the production files.
       A news item in HR noted that the film originally featured an unhappy ending until a negative sneak preview prompted the studio to reshoot the ending. This is supported by the material contained in the RKO Script files. In the original version of the produced script, dated 28 Jun 1939, "Mary Grey" leaves the Borden house, and although it is implied that "Tim Borden" follows her, the last shot is that of Mary, walking alone down Fifth Avenue. In the final continuity script, however, Tim catches up to Mary in the park, picks her up and carries her back into the house. Materials contained in the Script Files also note that writer Morrie Ryskind wrote a story outline for the film. In 1940, Ginger Rogers and Edward Arnold starred in a Lux Radio Theater version of this ... More Less

The working titles of the film were My Fifth Avenue Girl and The Other Half . Although some contemporary and modern sources list the title as Fifth Avenue Girl , the film's opening title card reads "5th Avenue Girl . Materials contained in the RKO Production Files at the UCLA Theater Arts Library note that the picture finished shooting twelve days ahead of schedule. Louis Calhern was originally cast as "Tommy Hopkins," according to the production files.
       A news item in HR noted that the film originally featured an unhappy ending until a negative sneak preview prompted the studio to reshoot the ending. This is supported by the material contained in the RKO Script files. In the original version of the produced script, dated 28 Jun 1939, "Mary Grey" leaves the Borden house, and although it is implied that "Tim Borden" follows her, the last shot is that of Mary, walking alone down Fifth Avenue. In the final continuity script, however, Tim catches up to Mary in the park, picks her up and carries her back into the house. Materials contained in the Script Files also note that writer Morrie Ryskind wrote a story outline for the film. In 1940, Ginger Rogers and Edward Arnold starred in a Lux Radio Theater version of this story. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
17 Aug 39
p. 3.
Film Daily
22 Aug 39
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jun 39
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 39
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 39
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
18 Aug 39
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
26 Aug 39
p. 50.
New York Times
25 Aug 39
p. 12.
Variety
23 Aug 39
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Pandro S. Berman in charge of production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITORS
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus score
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit publicity writer
STAND INS
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Other Half
My Fifth Avenue Girl
Release Date:
22 September 1939
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 25 August 1939
Production Date:
20 May--28 June 1939
retakes 9 August 1939
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
8 September 1939
Copyright Number:
LP9185
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82-83
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
5417
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

New York millionaire Timothy Borden, beset with government and union troubles in his business, leaves his office for the day with a reminder from his secretary that it is his birthday. He arrives home to find his wife Martha out with a playboy friend, and his son Tim playing polo. Lonely, he wanders into Central Park, where he meets Mary Grey. Alfred is so impressed with Mary's philosophy of life that when he discovers she is unemployed, he invites her to help celebrate his birthday. Alfred awakens the next morning with a hangover, a black eye, his name in the gossip columns and Mary in the guest room. Discovering that his little spree has rekindled Martha's interest in him, Alfred decides to keep Mary around the house to bring his family together. After he begins to neglect his business, forcing Tim to take over, Martha decides that she better stay at home and pay attention to her husband. His daughter Katherine marries the chauffeur, who then discards his Communist leanings for capitalism. Mary, however, feels that she has brought dissension to the family and leaves the Borden house in tears. When Tim discovers that Mary has been working for his father and not having an affair with him, he realizes that she means too much to him to let her go and he runs after her, picks her up and carries her back into the ... +


New York millionaire Timothy Borden, beset with government and union troubles in his business, leaves his office for the day with a reminder from his secretary that it is his birthday. He arrives home to find his wife Martha out with a playboy friend, and his son Tim playing polo. Lonely, he wanders into Central Park, where he meets Mary Grey. Alfred is so impressed with Mary's philosophy of life that when he discovers she is unemployed, he invites her to help celebrate his birthday. Alfred awakens the next morning with a hangover, a black eye, his name in the gossip columns and Mary in the guest room. Discovering that his little spree has rekindled Martha's interest in him, Alfred decides to keep Mary around the house to bring his family together. After he begins to neglect his business, forcing Tim to take over, Martha decides that she better stay at home and pay attention to her husband. His daughter Katherine marries the chauffeur, who then discards his Communist leanings for capitalism. Mary, however, feels that she has brought dissension to the family and leaves the Borden house in tears. When Tim discovers that Mary has been working for his father and not having an affair with him, he realizes that she means too much to him to let her go and he runs after her, picks her up and carries her back into the house. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.