Johnny Apollo (1940)

90 or 93 mins | Drama | 19 April 1940

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Dance with the Devil . According to a pre-production news item in HR , Fox considered borrowing George Raft from Warners to appear in this film. According to the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Darryl Zanuck directed that the father-son slant of the story be developed more and suggested Moroni Olsen for the role of McLaughlin and Ernest Truex for that of Brennan. In 1941, Burgess Meredith, Edward Arnold and Dorothy Lamour starred in a Lux Radio Theater version of this ... More Less

The working title of this film was Dance with the Devil . According to a pre-production news item in HR , Fox considered borrowing George Raft from Warners to appear in this film. According to the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Darryl Zanuck directed that the father-son slant of the story be developed more and suggested Moroni Olsen for the role of McLaughlin and Ernest Truex for that of Brennan. In 1941, Burgess Meredith, Edward Arnold and Dorothy Lamour starred in a Lux Radio Theater version of this story. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Apr 40
p. 3.
Film Daily
16 Apr 40
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 39
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 39
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 40
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Apr 40
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
16 Apr 40
p. 5.
Motion Picture Herald
3 Feb 40
p. 37.
Motion Picture Herald
20 Apr 40
pp. 34-35.
New York Times
13 Apr 40
p. 21.
Variety
17 Apr 40
p. 13.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Darryl F. Zanuck in charge of production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOURCES
SONGS
"Dancing for Nickles and Dimes," music by Lionel Newman, lyrics by Frank Loesser
"This Is the Beginning of the End," words and music by Mack Gordon.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Dance with the Devil
Release Date:
19 April 1940
Premiere Information:
Ossining, NY opening: 15 March 1940
Production Date:
began 4 December 1939
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
19 April 1940
Copyright Number:
LP9841
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90 or 93
Length(in feet):
8,403
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
5935
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After his father, a multimillion-dollar stockbroker, is indicted for embezzlement and sentenced to prison, Bob Cain Jr., feels betrayed and condemns the old man. He then quits college and begins to search for a job. Because of his father's notoriety, however, Bob is denied job after job and is still unemployed one year later. When Mickey Dwyer, a notorious gangster who was sentenced on the same day as his father, is paroled from prison, Bob decides to visit Dwyer's lawyer, Judge Emmett T. Brennan, to see if he can win a parole for his father. While waiting for the attorney, Bob meets "Lucky" Dubarry, Dwyer's girl friend. After Brennan informs Bob that only money can win a parole, Bob assumes the name of Johnny Apollo and joins Dwyer's gang in order to raise enough money to get his father out of jail. Upon learning that his son has become Dwyer's henchman, "Pop" Cain, one of the most beloved inmates in the prison, disowns Bob. Soon after, a reform administration determined to crack down on crime comes into office, and Lucky, who has fallen in love with Bob, convinces Brennan to make a deal with the district attorney: Bob's freedom in return for Dwyer's conviction. Learning of the double-cross, Dwyer murders Brennan, and both he and Bob are sent to jail. After overhearing plans for an escape, Lucky tips Pop to the break and the old man arrives just in time to prevent his son from joining Dwyer. In the ensuing struggle, Dwyer shoots Pop and knocks Bob unconscious, making it look as if Bob shot the old man. Dwyer dies in the escape, ... +


After his father, a multimillion-dollar stockbroker, is indicted for embezzlement and sentenced to prison, Bob Cain Jr., feels betrayed and condemns the old man. He then quits college and begins to search for a job. Because of his father's notoriety, however, Bob is denied job after job and is still unemployed one year later. When Mickey Dwyer, a notorious gangster who was sentenced on the same day as his father, is paroled from prison, Bob decides to visit Dwyer's lawyer, Judge Emmett T. Brennan, to see if he can win a parole for his father. While waiting for the attorney, Bob meets "Lucky" Dubarry, Dwyer's girl friend. After Brennan informs Bob that only money can win a parole, Bob assumes the name of Johnny Apollo and joins Dwyer's gang in order to raise enough money to get his father out of jail. Upon learning that his son has become Dwyer's henchman, "Pop" Cain, one of the most beloved inmates in the prison, disowns Bob. Soon after, a reform administration determined to crack down on crime comes into office, and Lucky, who has fallen in love with Bob, convinces Brennan to make a deal with the district attorney: Bob's freedom in return for Dwyer's conviction. Learning of the double-cross, Dwyer murders Brennan, and both he and Bob are sent to jail. After overhearing plans for an escape, Lucky tips Pop to the break and the old man arrives just in time to prevent his son from joining Dwyer. In the ensuing struggle, Dwyer shoots Pop and knocks Bob unconscious, making it look as if Bob shot the old man. Dwyer dies in the escape, and as Pop lies in critical condition from his wounds, there is talk of sending Bob to the chair. Pop regains consciousness, however, and reconciles with his son. After both men are paroled, father and son start a new life as free men, and Lucky and Bob are united. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.