Haunted Ranch (1943)

57 mins | Western | 19 February 1943

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Ridin' Double. In the opening credits, the film is listed as the "20th Picture in The 'Range Busters' Series." A modern source includes Carl Mathews, Jimmy Aubrey, Hank Bell, Augie Gomez and Jim Corey in the cast. For further information on the series, see the entry for The Range Busters in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.3620, and consult the Series Index. ...

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The working title of this film was Ridin' Double. In the opening credits, the film is listed as the "20th Picture in The 'Range Busters' Series." A modern source includes Carl Mathews, Jimmy Aubrey, Hank Bell, Augie Gomez and Jim Corey in the cast. For further information on the series, see the entry for The Range Busters in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.3620, and consult the Series Index.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
6 Nov 1942
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
18 May 1943
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
6-Mar-43
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Nov 1942
p. 1019
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Mar 1943
p. 1190
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A George W. Weeks Production; William L. Nolte in Charge of Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Robert Tansey
Dir
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
SOUND
Lyle Willey
Sd
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"Where the Prairie Hills Meet the Sky," music and lyrics by John King; "Little Brown Jug," music and lyrics by Joseph E. Winner.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Ridin' Double
Release Date:
19 February 1943
Production Date:
early Nov 1942
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Range Busters, Inc.
22 January 1943
LP11828
Duration(in mins):
57
Length(in feet):
4,975
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
8973
SYNOPSIS

Dusty, Alibi and Dave, lawmen known as the Range Busters, are about to take a vacation when Dusty gets a letter from U.S. Marshal Hammond asking them to investigate a ranch owned by a notorious outlaw named Reno Red, who robbed the Denver Mint, and presumedly hid the bullion somewhere on his property. Hammond fears that Reno Red's recent death will result in other outlaws unearthing the bullion and taking it. Dusty decides to postpone the investigation until after their vacation, as he knows that Dave will soon be enlisting in Teddy Roosevelt's "Rough Riders." At Reno Red's Stony Bend ranch, meanwhile, an outlaw gang consisting of leader Rance, Chuck, Ed and Danny, have moved in, hoping to find the bullion, and are trying to scare off everyone, including hired hand Sam, by lurking in the cellar and pretending the house is haunted. When they learn that Reno Red left the ranch to his East Coast niece, Helen Weston, and his outlaw nephew Hank Travers, Rance sends Danny to intercept and kill Hank. While out practicing sharpshooting, the Range Busters happen to witness the shooting, and while Dave chases Danny, Dusty and Alibi tend to Hank. Before he dies, Hank gives Dusty a letter from Reno Red's lawyer, informing him of his uncle "Abe's" bequest. Dave captures Danny and takes him to jail, while Dusty travels to Stony Bend with Alibi and impersonates Hank, unaware of his relationship to Reno Red. After hearing ghost-like noises in the ranch house, Dusty is pleasantly surprised when Helen arrives to claim her half of the inheritance. The will states that in order to claim their inheritance, ...

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Dusty, Alibi and Dave, lawmen known as the Range Busters, are about to take a vacation when Dusty gets a letter from U.S. Marshal Hammond asking them to investigate a ranch owned by a notorious outlaw named Reno Red, who robbed the Denver Mint, and presumedly hid the bullion somewhere on his property. Hammond fears that Reno Red's recent death will result in other outlaws unearthing the bullion and taking it. Dusty decides to postpone the investigation until after their vacation, as he knows that Dave will soon be enlisting in Teddy Roosevelt's "Rough Riders." At Reno Red's Stony Bend ranch, meanwhile, an outlaw gang consisting of leader Rance, Chuck, Ed and Danny, have moved in, hoping to find the bullion, and are trying to scare off everyone, including hired hand Sam, by lurking in the cellar and pretending the house is haunted. When they learn that Reno Red left the ranch to his East Coast niece, Helen Weston, and his outlaw nephew Hank Travers, Rance sends Danny to intercept and kill Hank. While out practicing sharpshooting, the Range Busters happen to witness the shooting, and while Dave chases Danny, Dusty and Alibi tend to Hank. Before he dies, Hank gives Dusty a letter from Reno Red's lawyer, informing him of his uncle "Abe's" bequest. Dave captures Danny and takes him to jail, while Dusty travels to Stony Bend with Alibi and impersonates Hank, unaware of his relationship to Reno Red. After hearing ghost-like noises in the ranch house, Dusty is pleasantly surprised when Helen arrives to claim her half of the inheritance. The will states that in order to claim their inheritance, they must learn to play Abe's favorite song on the organ, but does not specify which tune it is. Dave, meanwhile, is almost captured by an outlaw who was sent to find Danny, but outsmarts the man and delivers him to Marshal Hammond. Dave then enlists in the Rough Riders and sends his friend Rex to take over his duties with the Range Busters. Using his ventriloquist dummy, Elmer, Alibi gets people to talk and learns that "Reno Red" and "Abe" were the same person. Rance becomes suspicious of Dusty when, after positively identifying Hank's dead body, he learns that the outlaw is supposedly at the ranch. Rance goes to the ranch to check out Dusty, and is there when the sheriff arrests Dusty, believing that he is the outlaw Hank. Alibi and Rex, who is working undercover on the ranch, reveal to Helen and Sam their true identities. Rance breaks Dusty out of jail, intending to kill him, and in the process wounds the sheriff. Alibi and Rex arrive in time to save Dusty, but Rance escapes, and they reveal their mission to the sheriff. Rance's men, meanwhile, take Helen hostage, and Sam runs from the house when he hears her screams. Chuck and Ed search the house and realize that the organ, which is made of steel, probably contains the stolen gold. Although they figure out that the stops on the organ can be pulled out in a specific combination, they are interrupted in their efforts by the arrival of the Range Busters. After freeing Helen, the Range Busters engage in an all-out fistfight with the outlaws. As Sam is about to knock out one of the outlaws with a music box in the shape of a brown jug, he recalls Reno Red's favorite tune--"Little Brown Jug." The outlaws are arrested, and Dusty pulls the appropriate stops in the organ, which opens to reveal the gleaming bullion. The gold is returned to the Denver Mint, and with the outlaws safely behind bars, the Range Busters say goodbye to a grateful Helen and head for their next adventure.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.