Valley of the Giants (1938)

79 mins | Adventure | 17 September 1938

Director:

William Keighley

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Editor:

Jack Killifer

Production Designer:

Ted Smith

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

Peter B. Kyne's novel originally appeared in Red Book in Aug 1918. According to Warner Bros. press material, San Hedrin, the setting of the novel, was patterned after Eureka, CA., where the film was actually shot. Additional scenes were shot in Orick, north of Eureka and in the redwood groves. Press material credits Max Steiner with the music although Adolph Deutsch is credited onscreen. The thirty-foot dam destroyed in the film was built on the Van Duzen river at Bridgeville, CA. Footage from Warner Bros.' 1937 film God's Country and the Woman (see above) was also used. Warner records reveal that Henry O'Neill was tested for the part of McKenzie, Dick Foran and Allen Jenkins for Ox, John Litel for Sheriff, Russell Simpson for Hendricks and Gloria Dickson for Lee. The project was originally assigned to Ray Enright, who was replaced by William Keighley. The film was re-issued in 1948. Valley of the Giants was one of four 1938 films which Warner Bros. shot in Technicolor, all of which lost money except for The Adventures of Robin Hood (see above), the success of which encouraged the studio to use color again. Other versions of Kyne's novel include a 1919 film The Valley of the Giants produced by Paramount starring Wallace Reid (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20 ; F1.4707) and the 1927 First National film of the same title directed by Charles J. Brabin and starring Milton Sills (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films 1921-30 ; ... More Less

Peter B. Kyne's novel originally appeared in Red Book in Aug 1918. According to Warner Bros. press material, San Hedrin, the setting of the novel, was patterned after Eureka, CA., where the film was actually shot. Additional scenes were shot in Orick, north of Eureka and in the redwood groves. Press material credits Max Steiner with the music although Adolph Deutsch is credited onscreen. The thirty-foot dam destroyed in the film was built on the Van Duzen river at Bridgeville, CA. Footage from Warner Bros.' 1937 film God's Country and the Woman (see above) was also used. Warner records reveal that Henry O'Neill was tested for the part of McKenzie, Dick Foran and Allen Jenkins for Ox, John Litel for Sheriff, Russell Simpson for Hendricks and Gloria Dickson for Lee. The project was originally assigned to Ray Enright, who was replaced by William Keighley. The film was re-issued in 1948. Valley of the Giants was one of four 1938 films which Warner Bros. shot in Technicolor, all of which lost money except for The Adventures of Robin Hood (see above), the success of which encouraged the studio to use color again. Other versions of Kyne's novel include a 1919 film The Valley of the Giants produced by Paramount starring Wallace Reid (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20 ; F1.4707) and the 1927 First National film of the same title directed by Charles J. Brabin and starring Milton Sills (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films 1921-30 ; F2.6016). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
12 Sep 38
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Apr 38
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 38
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 38
pp. 8-9.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Sep 38
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
12 Sep 38
p. 9.
Motion Picture Herald
4 Jun 38
p. 40.
Motion Picture Herald
17 Sep 38
p. 41.
New York Times
10 Sep 38
p. 20.
Variety
17 Aug 38
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Technicolor photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Props
Props
Location mgr
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Color dir for the Technicolor Company
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Valley of the Giants by Peter B. Kyne (Garden City, NY, 1918).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 September 1938
Production Date:
18 April--mid June 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 July 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8206
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
79
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4399
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Howard Fallon and his partner Hendricks, who intend to exploit the redwood forests of Northern California, head west from Milwaukee accompanied by saloon owner Lee Roberts, her partner, Ed Morell, and gambler Fingers McCarthy. En route, Lee's covered wagon is stopped by a tree felled by Bill Cardigan, the territory's biggest landowner. Charmed by Lee's sophistication, Bill confesses his love for the redwoods and discloses his large debt to banker Andy Stone. Lee uses this knowledge to help Fallon claim homesteaders' property, corner the state land, and buy Bill's note from Stone. Beaten down, Bill's hopes are lifted when Ox Smith accidentally burns down the land office, destroying Fallon's claims. Fallon retaliates by calling Bill's note. Now, Bill's only chance is to cut his timber and get it down river and sold within six weeks. The entire community helps, but Fallon's henchmen sabotage their efforts by destroying the railroad trestle and damming the river. Lee, who has since fallen in love with Bill, warns him and along with Fingers, almost loses her life when they are locked in a caboose which is speeding towards the collapsed trestle. In a daring chase, Bill stops the runaway caboose and realizes Lee's loyalty. Bill's men dynamite the dam and capture Fallon, who surrenders and renews Bill's note, leaving Lee and Bill together surrounded by the ... +


Howard Fallon and his partner Hendricks, who intend to exploit the redwood forests of Northern California, head west from Milwaukee accompanied by saloon owner Lee Roberts, her partner, Ed Morell, and gambler Fingers McCarthy. En route, Lee's covered wagon is stopped by a tree felled by Bill Cardigan, the territory's biggest landowner. Charmed by Lee's sophistication, Bill confesses his love for the redwoods and discloses his large debt to banker Andy Stone. Lee uses this knowledge to help Fallon claim homesteaders' property, corner the state land, and buy Bill's note from Stone. Beaten down, Bill's hopes are lifted when Ox Smith accidentally burns down the land office, destroying Fallon's claims. Fallon retaliates by calling Bill's note. Now, Bill's only chance is to cut his timber and get it down river and sold within six weeks. The entire community helps, but Fallon's henchmen sabotage their efforts by destroying the railroad trestle and damming the river. Lee, who has since fallen in love with Bill, warns him and along with Fingers, almost loses her life when they are locked in a caboose which is speeding towards the collapsed trestle. In a daring chase, Bill stops the runaway caboose and realizes Lee's loyalty. Bill's men dynamite the dam and capture Fallon, who surrenders and renews Bill's note, leaving Lee and Bill together surrounded by the redwoods. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.