I Dream Too Much (1935)

85 or 95 mins | Musical | 29 November 1935

Director:

John Cromwell

Cinematographer:

David Abel

Editor:

William Morgan

Production Designer:

Van Nest Polglase

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Love Song . Lily Pons made her screen debut in the picture. According to the MPH review, the film, which ran 95 minutes in a preview screening, was to be cut. Post-release reviews and the copyright entry differ significantly on the films' length, however, and it is unclear whether RKO ever made the projected cuts. RKO borrowed Henry Fonda from Walter Wanger's production company for the film. According to one review, the lyrics for "I'm the Echo" were taken from a poem by Dorothy Fields. HR production charts add Betty Grable, Reginald Barlow, Paul Irving, Oscar Apfel, Kay Sutton, Billy Gilbert, Henry Hanna, Dewey Robinson, Edgar Norton, Ferdinand Gottschalk, De Witt Jennings and Jane Hamilton to the cast, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. According to a HR news item, Natale Carossio, the stage manager of the San Francisco Opera Company, was assigned to "assist" in the filming of this picture. The exact nature of his contribution has not been determined. The film was nominated for an Academy Award in the sound recording category.
       A biography of Jerome Kern gives the following production information: When Kern agreed to write music for the film, he demanded that Fields be his lyricist and then demanded that Robert Russell Bennett orchestrate his music instead of RKO music director Max Steiner. Pons, in turn, insisted that Andre Kostelanetz conduct her operatic arias. (Pons and Kostelanetz were married from 1938-1958). Kern was paid $5,000 per week by RKO, while Fields earned $1,000 per ... More Less

The working title of this film was Love Song . Lily Pons made her screen debut in the picture. According to the MPH review, the film, which ran 95 minutes in a preview screening, was to be cut. Post-release reviews and the copyright entry differ significantly on the films' length, however, and it is unclear whether RKO ever made the projected cuts. RKO borrowed Henry Fonda from Walter Wanger's production company for the film. According to one review, the lyrics for "I'm the Echo" were taken from a poem by Dorothy Fields. HR production charts add Betty Grable, Reginald Barlow, Paul Irving, Oscar Apfel, Kay Sutton, Billy Gilbert, Henry Hanna, Dewey Robinson, Edgar Norton, Ferdinand Gottschalk, De Witt Jennings and Jane Hamilton to the cast, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. According to a HR news item, Natale Carossio, the stage manager of the San Francisco Opera Company, was assigned to "assist" in the filming of this picture. The exact nature of his contribution has not been determined. The film was nominated for an Academy Award in the sound recording category.
       A biography of Jerome Kern gives the following production information: When Kern agreed to write music for the film, he demanded that Fields be his lyricist and then demanded that Robert Russell Bennett orchestrate his music instead of RKO music director Max Steiner. Pons, in turn, insisted that Andre Kostelanetz conduct her operatic arias. (Pons and Kostelanetz were married from 1938-1958). Kern was paid $5,000 per week by RKO, while Fields earned $1,000 per week. On 18 Sep 1935, producer Pandro Berman wired Kern that he was changing the title from Love Song to I Dream Too Much in order to exploit what Berman believed was to be the film's hit song. Berman encouraged Kern to promote the song as much as possible prior to the film's opening. In his autobiographical writings, Oscar Levant states that he helped out on some "technical details" on this film as an outgrowth of his "hero-worship" for Kern. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Nov 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
27 Nov 35
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jul 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Aug 35
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 35
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Sep 35
pp. 14-15.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 35
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
18 Nov 35
p. 10.
Motion Picture Herald
28 Sep 35
p. 347.
Motion Picture Herald
23 Nov 35
p. 70, 72
Motion Picture Herald
7 Dec 35
p. 39.
New York Times
29 Nov 35
p. 24.
Variety
4 Dec 35
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Pandro S. Berman Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Scr
Story
Contr to dial
Contr to trmt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
DANCE
Dances created by
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
SONGS
"Bell Song" from the opera Lakmé , music by by Léo Delibes, libretto by Edmond Gondinet and Philippe Gille
"Caro nome" from the opera Rigoletto , music by Giuseppe Verdi, libretto by Francesco Maria Piave
"The Jockey on the Carrousel," "I'm the Echo (You're the Song That I Love)," "I Dream Too Much" and "I Got Love," music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Dorothy Fields.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Love Song
Release Date:
29 November 1935
Production Date:
1 August--late September 1935
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, inc.
Copyright Date:
28 November 1935
Copyright Number:
LP6005
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
85 or 95
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1604
SYNOPSIS

While sneaking out of her uncle's house in Southern France, reluctant opera student Annette Manard falls on top of Jonathan Street, an aspiring American composer visiting from Paris, who then escorts her to a carnival. The next morning, Jonathan awakens to discover that, during the previous night's revelry, he married Annette in a drunken stupor. Undaunted by her husband's panic, Annette convinces him to take her to Paris and quickly wins his sincere love. Soon after, Jonathan overhears Annette singing to a boy on a merry-go-round and encourages her to pursue a singing career. While he works as a tour guide to make financial ends meet, Annette takes a job as a cabaret singer. Frustrated by his inability to sell his opera, Echo and Narcissus , however, the proud Jonathan eventually forces Annette to quit the cabaret. Annette, determined to help Jonathan, takes his opera to theatrical agent Paul Darcy and cajoles him into an audition. Impressed by Annette's singing, Darcy signs her to a generous contract and launches her operatic career, but rejects Jonathan's opera. After Annette's enormously successful debut, Jonathan learns at an opening night party that she has paid a Monte Carlo opera house to produce Echo and Narcissus . His pride wounded, Jonathan accuses Annette of humiliating him and leaves her. Eventually, a lonely and unhappy Annette finds an equally miserable Jonathan driving a cab in Paris, and the couple renews their marital commitment. Once again, however, Jonathan's pride and envy get the better of him, and he forces Annette to return to her lush life as an opera star. With Darcy's help, Annette reworks ... +


While sneaking out of her uncle's house in Southern France, reluctant opera student Annette Manard falls on top of Jonathan Street, an aspiring American composer visiting from Paris, who then escorts her to a carnival. The next morning, Jonathan awakens to discover that, during the previous night's revelry, he married Annette in a drunken stupor. Undaunted by her husband's panic, Annette convinces him to take her to Paris and quickly wins his sincere love. Soon after, Jonathan overhears Annette singing to a boy on a merry-go-round and encourages her to pursue a singing career. While he works as a tour guide to make financial ends meet, Annette takes a job as a cabaret singer. Frustrated by his inability to sell his opera, Echo and Narcissus , however, the proud Jonathan eventually forces Annette to quit the cabaret. Annette, determined to help Jonathan, takes his opera to theatrical agent Paul Darcy and cajoles him into an audition. Impressed by Annette's singing, Darcy signs her to a generous contract and launches her operatic career, but rejects Jonathan's opera. After Annette's enormously successful debut, Jonathan learns at an opening night party that she has paid a Monte Carlo opera house to produce Echo and Narcissus . His pride wounded, Jonathan accuses Annette of humiliating him and leaves her. Eventually, a lonely and unhappy Annette finds an equally miserable Jonathan driving a cab in Paris, and the couple renews their marital commitment. Once again, however, Jonathan's pride and envy get the better of him, and he forces Annette to return to her lush life as an opera star. With Darcy's help, Annette reworks Echo and Narcissus into a stage musical and secures a London production. After he is showered with praise, Jonathan accepts his place in the musical world and reunites with Annette, who eagerly quits her opera career to become an ordinary wife and mother. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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