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HISTORY

The film opens with a tribute to the famous racing drivers who appear in the production, many of whom play themselves in the race scenes. William Arnold, who plays Bill in the film, was the winner of the 1930 Indianapolis 500 race. According to FD , Dorothy MacKaill was considered for the part of Lee. Modern sources list the following additional cast credits: Phil Pardee, Lou Schneider, Bryan Salspaugh ( Racing drivers ), James Burtis ( Mechanic ), Sam Hayes ( Ascot announcer ), Robert McWade ( Tom, counterman ), Ralph Dunn ( Official ), John Conte ( Announcer ) and John Harron ( Red, Eddie's pitman ). Additional modern source crew credits include: Supv , Raymond Griffith; Makeup , Perc Westmore; and Asst dir , Dick Rosson . Modern sources list The Roar of the Crowd and The Roaring Crowd as alternate titles and state that the race scenes were filmed at Indianapolis, Ventura and Ascot race tracks. A French-language version, La foule hurle , was also produced in 1932. Warner Bros. remade this film in 1939 as Indianapolis Speedway (see ... More Less

The film opens with a tribute to the famous racing drivers who appear in the production, many of whom play themselves in the race scenes. William Arnold, who plays Bill in the film, was the winner of the 1930 Indianapolis 500 race. According to FD , Dorothy MacKaill was considered for the part of Lee. Modern sources list the following additional cast credits: Phil Pardee, Lou Schneider, Bryan Salspaugh ( Racing drivers ), James Burtis ( Mechanic ), Sam Hayes ( Ascot announcer ), Robert McWade ( Tom, counterman ), Ralph Dunn ( Official ), John Conte ( Announcer ) and John Harron ( Red, Eddie's pitman ). Additional modern source crew credits include: Supv , Raymond Griffith; Makeup , Perc Westmore; and Asst dir , Dick Rosson . Modern sources list The Roar of the Crowd and The Roaring Crowd as alternate titles and state that the race scenes were filmed at Indianapolis, Ventura and Ascot race tracks. A French-language version, La foule hurle , was also produced in 1932. Warner Bros. remade this film in 1939 as Indianapolis Speedway (see below). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
27 Mar 32
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Mar 32
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
2 Apr 32
p. 38.
New York Times
3 Apr 32
p. 4.
Variety
29 Mar 32
p. 24.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Photog
Photog
Photog
Photog
Asst cam
Racing seq
Racing seq
Tech eff
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Still photog
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 April 1932
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 March 1932
Copyright Number:
LP2936
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
84-85
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Racecar driver Joe Greer strongly believes that a family has no place in racing. For this reason, he refuses to marry his mistress, Lee Merrick, and tries to discourage his younger brother Eddie from taking up the sport. Once he learns that Eddie is determined to race and that he is good at it, however, Joe agrees to take him on the road, but tries to protect him from the less attractive side of racing. He keeps his relationship with Lee a secret, deeply wounding her by his actions. He completely breaks with Lee when he discovers Eddie having a drink with her and her friend, Anne Scott. Furious at the way her friend has been treated, Anne decides to seduce Eddie, but to her surprise, she falls in love with him. Joe, who is drinking heavily, and Eddie quarrel over Anne, parting bitterly. Joe's backup driver, Spud Connors, tries to separate the brothers in a race that night, and a drunken Joe drives him off the track to his death. His nerve broken by Spud's death, Joe starts losing races and ends up riding the rails as a hobo. Lee, who is still in love with Joe, borrows money to travel to Indianapolis for the 500 race, certain that Joe will be there. She meets him at the lunch stand where she is working and learns that he stopped drinking after Spud's death. During the race, when Eddie has a blowout and is injured, Joe takes over as relief driver, winning the race just before his car crashes. Joe is not badly hurt, and he and Eddie ... +


Racecar driver Joe Greer strongly believes that a family has no place in racing. For this reason, he refuses to marry his mistress, Lee Merrick, and tries to discourage his younger brother Eddie from taking up the sport. Once he learns that Eddie is determined to race and that he is good at it, however, Joe agrees to take him on the road, but tries to protect him from the less attractive side of racing. He keeps his relationship with Lee a secret, deeply wounding her by his actions. He completely breaks with Lee when he discovers Eddie having a drink with her and her friend, Anne Scott. Furious at the way her friend has been treated, Anne decides to seduce Eddie, but to her surprise, she falls in love with him. Joe, who is drinking heavily, and Eddie quarrel over Anne, parting bitterly. Joe's backup driver, Spud Connors, tries to separate the brothers in a race that night, and a drunken Joe drives him off the track to his death. His nerve broken by Spud's death, Joe starts losing races and ends up riding the rails as a hobo. Lee, who is still in love with Joe, borrows money to travel to Indianapolis for the 500 race, certain that Joe will be there. She meets him at the lunch stand where she is working and learns that he stopped drinking after Spud's death. During the race, when Eddie has a blowout and is injured, Joe takes over as relief driver, winning the race just before his car crashes. Joe is not badly hurt, and he and Eddie are reconciled. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.