The Cuban Love Song (1931)

80 or 86 mins | Musical | 5 December 1931

Director:

W. S. Van Dyke

Cinematographer:

Harold Rosson

Editor:

Margaret Booth

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

Two of the film's songs, "The Cuban Love Song" and "El manisero" (The Peanut Vendor) were among the most popular tunes of the year and were representative of the increasing popularity of the Rhumba and other Latin American inspired music during the 1930s. "The Peanut Vendor," with English lyrics by W. Marion Sunshine and L. Wolfe Gilbert, also became a hit song.
       The Cuban Love Song was opera star Lawrence Tibbett's last film for several years, before returning to the screen in Metropolitan, a 1935 Twentieth Century-Fox film. He appeared exclusively on the operatic stage and in concerts during his absence from the screen. One sequence in the picture features Tibbett singing "The Cuban Love Song" in a duet with himself through the use of a split-screen technique which shows the character "Terry" singing while his "conscience" sings with him. The Var review incorrectly attributed the role of "Elvira" to Hale Hamilton and did not list Louise Fazenda at all. ...

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Two of the film's songs, "The Cuban Love Song" and "El manisero" (The Peanut Vendor) were among the most popular tunes of the year and were representative of the increasing popularity of the Rhumba and other Latin American inspired music during the 1930s. "The Peanut Vendor," with English lyrics by W. Marion Sunshine and L. Wolfe Gilbert, also became a hit song.
       The Cuban Love Song was opera star Lawrence Tibbett's last film for several years, before returning to the screen in Metropolitan, a 1935 Twentieth Century-Fox film. He appeared exclusively on the operatic stage and in concerts during his absence from the screen. One sequence in the picture features Tibbett singing "The Cuban Love Song" in a duet with himself through the use of a split-screen technique which shows the character "Terry" singing while his "conscience" sings with him. The Var review incorrectly attributed the role of "Elvira" to Hale Hamilton and did not list Louise Fazenda at all.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
6 Dec 1931
p. 10
HF
5 Sep 1931
p. 20
HF
19 Sep 1931
p. 17
HF
10 Oct 1931
p. 20
Hollywood Reporter
6 Aug 1931
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 1931
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
16 Oct 1931
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
24 Oct 1931
pp. 30-31
New York Times
5 Dec 1931
p. 21
Variety
8 Dec 1931
p. 10
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Adpt
Addl dial
Addl dial
Addl dial
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Cuban Love Song" and "Tramps at Sea," music and lyrics by Herbert Stothart, Dorothy Fields and James McHugh; " El manisero " (The Peanut Vendor)," music and lyrics by Moises Simons, "K-K-K-Katy," music and lyrics by Geoffrey O'Hara.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Cuban
Release Date:
5 December 1931
Production Date:
early Sep--early Oct 1931
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.
30 October 1931
LP2593
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80 or 86
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

In 1917, an American ship is about to leave San Francisco for Cuba and marines Terry, Romance and O. O. Jones are up to their usual practice of carousing when off duty. Terry's fiancée Crystal understands him and promises to wait, even though she knows he'll rarely write. Once in Havana, Terry incurs the anger of a peanut vendor named Nenita Lopez when he accidentally crashes into her cart, but her antagonism soon turns to love. Although Nenita at first refuses to make love to Terry, she soon succumbs and the two begin a passionate affair. Even when Terry gets a letter from Crystal and realizes that he has behaved badly he cannot give Nenita up. They go away while he has a leave but are heartbroken when O. O. and Romance must take him back to the ship when they are ordered to go to France as the United States enters World War I. During a battle, Terry is badly wounded in the leg and sent back home. Embittered, he at first rejects Crystal, but her kindness and love for him convinces him to go through with their marriage. Many years pass and on their tenth anniversary, they are celebrating in a New York nightclub. When the orchestra plays "The Peanut Vendor Song," which Terry and Nenita used to sing together, he becomes depressed. He then wanders the streets thinking of Nenita and accidentally finds Romance who then takes him to O. O.'s apartment, where they get very drunk. Going out to get some castor oil for O. O.'s wife Elvira, Terry boards a ship bound for Havana, ...

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In 1917, an American ship is about to leave San Francisco for Cuba and marines Terry, Romance and O. O. Jones are up to their usual practice of carousing when off duty. Terry's fiancée Crystal understands him and promises to wait, even though she knows he'll rarely write. Once in Havana, Terry incurs the anger of a peanut vendor named Nenita Lopez when he accidentally crashes into her cart, but her antagonism soon turns to love. Although Nenita at first refuses to make love to Terry, she soon succumbs and the two begin a passionate affair. Even when Terry gets a letter from Crystal and realizes that he has behaved badly he cannot give Nenita up. They go away while he has a leave but are heartbroken when O. O. and Romance must take him back to the ship when they are ordered to go to France as the United States enters World War I. During a battle, Terry is badly wounded in the leg and sent back home. Embittered, he at first rejects Crystal, but her kindness and love for him convinces him to go through with their marriage. Many years pass and on their tenth anniversary, they are celebrating in a New York nightclub. When the orchestra plays "The Peanut Vendor Song," which Terry and Nenita used to sing together, he becomes depressed. He then wanders the streets thinking of Nenita and accidentally finds Romance who then takes him to O. O.'s apartment, where they get very drunk. Going out to get some castor oil for O. O.'s wife Elvira, Terry boards a ship bound for Havana, and O. O. follows, thinking it's the Hoboken Ferry. Once in Cuba, Terry has difficulty locating Nenita, then learns that she has recently died. While visiting her grave, he hears a young boy singing "The Peanut Vendor Song," and discovers that the boy is his own son by Nenita. When their ship arrives in New York, Terry is greeted by Crystal who wants to continue being his wife and a mother to Terry, Jr. Both Terrys joyfully agree.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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