We're in the Legion Now (1936)

55.5-56 or 64-65 mins | Comedy | 13 December 1936

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HISTORY

This working title, and the title under which some sources reviewed the picture, was Rest Cure . Grand National Films, Inc. is the only company name listed on the print viewed; however, most contemporary sources credited Regal Productions, Inc. with the production, while others listed Condor Pictures, Inc. Both Regal and Condor were owned by producer George A. Hirliman. Actor Manuel Peluffo's surname was incorrectly spelled "Pelufo" in the onscreen credits. Although one contemporary source indicated that the film contained at least one song composed by Julie Cruze, there were no songs in the print viewed and neither Cruze nor any song titles were listed in the onscreen credits.
       A Spanish-language version of the film, titled De la sartén al fuego , was shot simultaneously with the English-language version and was produced by Metropolitan Pictures Corp., a company set up by Hirliman to produce Spanish versions of some of his films. The 9 Jun 1937 Var review does not list John Reinhardt (director of the Spanish version of this film) as "Ringleader," but includes Charles Moyer as "Recruit ringleader." According to a HR news item on 10 Oct 1935, Anita Page and Dorothy Sebastian were given screen tests for roles in this film. Sebastian is listed in the cast list in a HR news item the following day, but neither she nor Page appear in the viewed print.
       The film's release was more than a year after the end of production. According to a HR news item in Feb 1936, Hirliman had cut the film considerably. The English-language version, which was screened ... More Less

This working title, and the title under which some sources reviewed the picture, was Rest Cure . Grand National Films, Inc. is the only company name listed on the print viewed; however, most contemporary sources credited Regal Productions, Inc. with the production, while others listed Condor Pictures, Inc. Both Regal and Condor were owned by producer George A. Hirliman. Actor Manuel Peluffo's surname was incorrectly spelled "Pelufo" in the onscreen credits. Although one contemporary source indicated that the film contained at least one song composed by Julie Cruze, there were no songs in the print viewed and neither Cruze nor any song titles were listed in the onscreen credits.
       A Spanish-language version of the film, titled De la sartén al fuego , was shot simultaneously with the English-language version and was produced by Metropolitan Pictures Corp., a company set up by Hirliman to produce Spanish versions of some of his films. The 9 Jun 1937 Var review does not list John Reinhardt (director of the Spanish version of this film) as "Ringleader," but includes Charles Moyer as "Recruit ringleader." According to a HR news item on 10 Oct 1935, Anita Page and Dorothy Sebastian were given screen tests for roles in this film. Sebastian is listed in the cast list in a HR news item the following day, but neither she nor Page appear in the viewed print.
       The film's release was more than a year after the end of production. According to a HR news item in Feb 1936, Hirliman had cut the film considerably. The English-language version, which was screened in New York on 3-4 Jun 1937 at a length of 56 minutes, the approximate running time of the print viewed, may have been cut from the 64-65 minute running times listed in some reviews and release charts. As stated in an 18 Feb 1936 HR ad for Rest Cure [printed before the film’s title was changed to We’re in the Legion Now ], the picture was the "first all-color Regal production." However, the ad erroneously listed the picture as the first American independent feature made in color. As noted in the Var review, the desert and native village shots in the film were taken from newsreel stock footage. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
CM
Feb 1936
p. 76.
Daily Variety
21 Oct 1935
p. 10.
Daily Variety
5 Nov 1935
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 1935
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Oct 1935
p. 4, 11
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 1935
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Nov 1935
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 1936
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 1936
pp. 4-5.
Motion Picture Daily
7 Feb 1936
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
15 Feb 1936
p. 48.
Variety
4 Feb 1936
p. 3.
Variety
9 Jun 1937
p. 23.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A George A. Hirliman Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
From an orig story by
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Chief photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Dance cost by
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
COLOR PERSONNEL
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
De la sartén al fuego
Rest Cure
La legión extranjera
Release Date:
13 December 1936
Production Date:
21 October--5 November 1935 at Talisman Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Grand National Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
13 January 1937
Copyright Number:
LP6891
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Magnacolor (Hirlicolor)
Duration(in mins):
55.5-56 or 64-65
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
1808
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The suave Dan Linton and his unrefined partner, Spike Conover, are two American ex-racketeers hiding from their enemies in Paris. At a cafe, they charm Louise, the wife of Henri Rillette, and her sister Yvonne Cartier. When the gangsters claim that they are businessmen seeking “peace and quiet,” Yvonne jokingly suggests that they go to Morocco and join the Foreign Legion. Dan and Spike abruptly flee when they spot Al Perrelli, a rival gangster who appears to be carrying a machine gun, and soon after, they decide to join the legion, thinking their lives will be less stressful. On the train, they again encounter Henri, who has been transferred to Morocco, and, unaware that he is a captain in the legion and their superior officer, make mischief that results in Henri being dragged out of the dining car by train employees. In Morocco, Henri orders one of his men, Sergeant Groebner, to consider Dan and Spike under arrest during their training and not to spare necessary disciplinary measures. Meanwhile, unknown to Henri, Arab brigands led by Sheik Abdul-Ben-Abou and his subordinate Ali smuggle arms into the area, using Henri’s car. Some time later, Dan and Spike are ordered into town on an errand and encounter Honey Evans, an American cabaret dancer to whom they are both attracted and with whom they shirk duties and get drunk. Spike’s inconvenient habit of throwing empty bottles over his shoulders causes disorder in the bar, and when Henri discovers them, Dan and Spike are placed under arrest and soon after told they will be transferred to an outpost that is under attack. Believing that the transfer came about because ... +


The suave Dan Linton and his unrefined partner, Spike Conover, are two American ex-racketeers hiding from their enemies in Paris. At a cafe, they charm Louise, the wife of Henri Rillette, and her sister Yvonne Cartier. When the gangsters claim that they are businessmen seeking “peace and quiet,” Yvonne jokingly suggests that they go to Morocco and join the Foreign Legion. Dan and Spike abruptly flee when they spot Al Perrelli, a rival gangster who appears to be carrying a machine gun, and soon after, they decide to join the legion, thinking their lives will be less stressful. On the train, they again encounter Henri, who has been transferred to Morocco, and, unaware that he is a captain in the legion and their superior officer, make mischief that results in Henri being dragged out of the dining car by train employees. In Morocco, Henri orders one of his men, Sergeant Groebner, to consider Dan and Spike under arrest during their training and not to spare necessary disciplinary measures. Meanwhile, unknown to Henri, Arab brigands led by Sheik Abdul-Ben-Abou and his subordinate Ali smuggle arms into the area, using Henri’s car. Some time later, Dan and Spike are ordered into town on an errand and encounter Honey Evans, an American cabaret dancer to whom they are both attracted and with whom they shirk duties and get drunk. Spike’s inconvenient habit of throwing empty bottles over his shoulders causes disorder in the bar, and when Henri discovers them, Dan and Spike are placed under arrest and soon after told they will be transferred to an outpost that is under attack. Believing that the transfer came about because Groebner, who is attracted to Honey, wants no romantic rivals, Dan and Spike hold the sergeant at gunpoint and bribe him to assign them “soft jobs” with the offer of monthly payments until their terms of enlistment are complete. Soon after, Dan is ordered to escort Yvonne on a horseback ride. Although they enjoy each other’s company, as the outing ends, they barely escape an ambush by Abdul-Ben-Abdou’s men. Later, Spike enjoys a rendezvous with Honey, until Dan attempts to cut in, and Groebner unexpectedly appears. An argument commences, which is overheard by Henri, who learns about the bribe, and arranges for all three men to be transferred to his next assignment location. While at their punishment assignment, El Gazar, Dan and Spike are able to avert the kidnapping of Yvonne, Louise and the general’s wife, whom Abdul-Ben-Abdou tries to take as hostages. However, because of past misconduct and various other infractions, the general sentences Dan and Spike to six months of hard labor at a disciplinary camp run by Adjutant Cartellini. When Cartellini, a cruel taskmaster supposed by the prisoners to have gone insane, causes the death of one of the prisoners, Dan attempts to stand up to him. Cartellini is poised to torture Dan in retaliation until Spike initiates a riot, which is interrupted by Abdul-Ben-Abdou’s men surrounding the camp and fatally shooting the adjutant. Meanwhile, Yvonne and Louise, who were grateful to Dan and Spike for their rescue, had convinced Henri to bring them to the work camp for a visit, so that they, too, were trapped at the camp when the Arabs attacked. An exchange of gunfire between the Legionnaires and the Arabs results in a stalemate and, although Henri is able to contact his post to tell them of their emergency, he knows that aid cannot arrive until the next morning. During the night, the Arabs secretly plant a canteen filled with nitroglycerin dangerously near the besieged prisoners. Later, finding that the camp’s water supply has been destroyed, Dan and Spike sneak out to retrieve the canteens of dead Arabs. When a sip from one canteen tastes foul, Spike, who is unaware of its lethal contents, pitches it in the direction of the enemy, inadvertently causing an explosion. By the time help arrives, the legionnaires already have attained victory over their enemies. As a reward, Henri arranges for a revoke of Dan’s and Spike’s sentences and promotes each of them to the rank of corporal. Finally, Dan and Yvonne make plans to see more of each other. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.