Hit Parade of 1943 (1943)

82 mins | Musical | 26 March 1943

Director:

Albert S. Rogell

Writer:

Frank Gill Jr.

Cinematographer:

Jack Marta

Editor:

Thomas Richards

Production Designer:

Russell Kimball

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The viewed print was entitled Change of Heart , and as noted in the onscreen credits, was "revised" from Hit Parade of 1943 and re-released in 1949. Although cast members Jack Williams, Pops and Louie, The Music Maids and The Three Cheers were not listed on the credits of the viewed print, Republic records indicate that they were credited on the original release. The Var preview review gives the picture's running time as 90 minutes, although other contemporary sources list the running time as 82 minutes. The following information comes from contemporary sources: Edmund Grainger was originally set as the picture's producer, and in Mar 1942, Barry Trivers was assigned to work on the screenplay. The extent of Trivers' contribution to the completed picture has not been determined, however. Republic first offered the leading roles to Milton Berle and Constance Bennett, but Berle declined the role in order to appear in a musical comedy on the stage. Anne Jeffreys, who was initially cast in a small role, was instead cast in the studio's picture Chatterbox . John Carroll was borrowed from M-G-M and Susan Hayward was borrowed from Paramount for the production.
       According to a HR news item, Republic held a nationwide contest for the worst song title. The winner, "Autumn Leaves in the Gutter, Never Again Will They Flutter," was submitted by W. F. McFadden, but it has not been determined if he actually composed the music and lyrics or only the title. In the film, the song is sung by "Westinghouse," who wants "Rick Farrell" to publish it. Another HR ... More Less

The viewed print was entitled Change of Heart , and as noted in the onscreen credits, was "revised" from Hit Parade of 1943 and re-released in 1949. Although cast members Jack Williams, Pops and Louie, The Music Maids and The Three Cheers were not listed on the credits of the viewed print, Republic records indicate that they were credited on the original release. The Var preview review gives the picture's running time as 90 minutes, although other contemporary sources list the running time as 82 minutes. The following information comes from contemporary sources: Edmund Grainger was originally set as the picture's producer, and in Mar 1942, Barry Trivers was assigned to work on the screenplay. The extent of Trivers' contribution to the completed picture has not been determined, however. Republic first offered the leading roles to Milton Berle and Constance Bennett, but Berle declined the role in order to appear in a musical comedy on the stage. Anne Jeffreys, who was initially cast in a small role, was instead cast in the studio's picture Chatterbox . John Carroll was borrowed from M-G-M and Susan Hayward was borrowed from Paramount for the production.
       According to a HR news item, Republic held a nationwide contest for the worst song title. The winner, "Autumn Leaves in the Gutter, Never Again Will They Flutter," was submitted by W. F. McFadden, but it has not been determined if he actually composed the music and lyrics or only the title. In the film, the song is sung by "Westinghouse," who wants "Rick Farrell" to publish it. Another HR news item stated that the film would be the "first picture to contain dim-out shots of New York City. It also will show Gotham as effected by gas rationing." These scenes were to have been filmed by director Al Rogell during a trip to New York City, but they were not included in the viewed print. The film received Academy Award nominations in the Music (Scoring of a Musical Picture) and Music (Song--"A Change of Heart") categories. Astrid Allwyn made her last film appearance in this picture, which was the third of Republic's "Hit Parade" films. For more information on the films, see the entry for The Hit Parade in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 (F3.1934). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
13 Mar 1943.
---
Daily Variety
8 Mar 43
p. 3.
Film Daily
8 Mar 43
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Mar 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 42
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Oct 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Oct 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Oct 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 42
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Nov 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Nov 42
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Nov 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Dec 42
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 43
p. 2.
Motion Picture Daily
8 Mar 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald
13 Mar 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Dec 42
p. 1043.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 Mar 43
p. 1202.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 Apr 43
p. 1280.
New York Times
16 Apr 43
p. 24.
Variety
10 Mar 43
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Miss Patrick's gowns by
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
DANCE
STAND INS
Singing voice double for Susan Hayward
SOURCES
SONGS
"A Change of Heart," "Do These Old Eyes Deceive Me," "Tahm Boom Bah," "Harlem Sandman," "Who Took Me Home Last Night?" and "That's How to Write a Song," music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Harold Adamson
"Yankee Doodle Tan," music by J. C. Johnson, lyrics by Andy Razaf
"Autumn Leaves in the Gutter, Never Again Will They Flutter," composer undetermined.
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 March 1943
Production Date:
4 Nov--mid Dec 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
16 March 1943
Copyright Number:
LP11947
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82
Length(in feet):
7,778
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9005
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When amateur songwriter Jill Wright moves from the Midwest to New York City, she is dismayed to discover that Rick Farrell, the owner of Miracle Publishing Co., has claimed as his own the song she submitted to his company. Jill confronts Rick, who is a smooth-talking ladies' man, and he convinces her to ghostwrite songs for him to gain familiarity with the business. Unknown to Rick, Jill plans to copyright her songs in her own name and expose his double-crossing after his reputation has made the songs famous. Rick's life is complicated further by his surreptitious romance with singer Toni Jarrett. When Toni's boyfriend, influential club owner Bradley Cole, commissions Rick to write a new song, Rick and Jill receive the first test of their secret partnership. Their song is a hit, and they sincerely begin to fall in love--despite their intentions to use romance only as a means to keep each other in line. Soon their success leads to a new office for Miracle, and Rick decides to proclaim Jill as the author of their latest hit, "A Change of Heart," when the song makes the Hit Parade. He also intends for the announcement to be his wedding present to Jill, for he wishes to propose to her, but when Toni finds out, she tricks Jill into thinking that Rick means to marry her instead. Toni then confronts Rick, who tells her that they are through. Determined to ruin Rick's chance at happiness, Toni persuades Cole to ban "A Change of Heart" from his clubs, and when the song is not played any longer, it appears that it will not make ... +


When amateur songwriter Jill Wright moves from the Midwest to New York City, she is dismayed to discover that Rick Farrell, the owner of Miracle Publishing Co., has claimed as his own the song she submitted to his company. Jill confronts Rick, who is a smooth-talking ladies' man, and he convinces her to ghostwrite songs for him to gain familiarity with the business. Unknown to Rick, Jill plans to copyright her songs in her own name and expose his double-crossing after his reputation has made the songs famous. Rick's life is complicated further by his surreptitious romance with singer Toni Jarrett. When Toni's boyfriend, influential club owner Bradley Cole, commissions Rick to write a new song, Rick and Jill receive the first test of their secret partnership. Their song is a hit, and they sincerely begin to fall in love--despite their intentions to use romance only as a means to keep each other in line. Soon their success leads to a new office for Miracle, and Rick decides to proclaim Jill as the author of their latest hit, "A Change of Heart," when the song makes the Hit Parade. He also intends for the announcement to be his wedding present to Jill, for he wishes to propose to her, but when Toni finds out, she tricks Jill into thinking that Rick means to marry her instead. Toni then confronts Rick, who tells her that they are through. Determined to ruin Rick's chance at happiness, Toni persuades Cole to ban "A Change of Heart" from his clubs, and when the song is not played any longer, it appears that it will not make the Hit Parade. Knowing that he needs only one more play of the song for it to hit the big time, Rick and his partner, J. MacClellan Davis, pawn their possessions and pledge ten thousand dollars for a war bond on a radio show offering to play song requests in exchange for pledges. Rick intends to announce Jill's authorship of the song after he performs it on the show, and while he prepares, Mac goes to Jill's apartment and explains the situation to her. Upon learning about Toni's treachery, and the fact that Rick intends to derail his own career for her sake, Jill rushes to the radio studio. She then tears up the speech that Rick intended to give and ends the song by kissing him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.