The Blue Veil (1951)

113-114 mins | Drama | October 1951

Full page view
HISTORY

The film opens with the following written quotation: "'Who raises a child of his own flesh lives with nature; who raises a child of another's lives with God.' Meritas." No information about the source of this quotation has been found. The term "blue veil" refers to a traditional ornament worn by governesses. The Blue Veil was a remake of the 1942 French film Le voile bleu , which was directed by Jean Stelli and starred Gaby Morlay. Le voile bleu was released in the U.S. in late 1947 under the title The Blue Veil .
       HR news items and production charts, and studio publicity material, contained in the file on the film at the AMPAS Library, add the following information about the production: In Nov 1950, RKO announced that it was planning to produce the picture in France, but ultimately shot the film in Hollywood. English actor Robert Newton was announced as one of the film's stars in late Mar 1951, but he did not appear in the completed picture. Martha Scott, who had starred in a handful of films in the 1940s before focusing on a New York stage career, also was to appear. Katharine Locke is listed as a cast member in early production charts, but her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. RKO borrowed Jane Wyman from Warner Bros. for the production. The film's confirmation scene was shot at the All Saint's Episcopal Church in Pasadena, CA, and featured the church's Youth Choir. Although publicity material states that the church's rector, Dr. John F. Scott, appeared as himself, the CBCS lists ... More Less

The film opens with the following written quotation: "'Who raises a child of his own flesh lives with nature; who raises a child of another's lives with God.' Meritas." No information about the source of this quotation has been found. The term "blue veil" refers to a traditional ornament worn by governesses. The Blue Veil was a remake of the 1942 French film Le voile bleu , which was directed by Jean Stelli and starred Gaby Morlay. Le voile bleu was released in the U.S. in late 1947 under the title The Blue Veil .
       HR news items and production charts, and studio publicity material, contained in the file on the film at the AMPAS Library, add the following information about the production: In Nov 1950, RKO announced that it was planning to produce the picture in France, but ultimately shot the film in Hollywood. English actor Robert Newton was announced as one of the film's stars in late Mar 1951, but he did not appear in the completed picture. Martha Scott, who had starred in a handful of films in the 1940s before focusing on a New York stage career, also was to appear. Katharine Locke is listed as a cast member in early production charts, but her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. RKO borrowed Jane Wyman from Warner Bros. for the production. The film's confirmation scene was shot at the All Saint's Episcopal Church in Pasadena, CA, and featured the church's Youth Choir. Although publicity material states that the church's rector, Dr. John F. Scott, appeared as himself, the CBCS lists Lewis Martin as the "archbishop," the film's only church official role. Scott's appearance in the final film has not been confirmed.
       The San Marino, CA, estate of Mrs. E. B. Holladay, the sister of railroad magnate Henry Huntington, was used for the "Palfrey" home. Wyman and Joan Blondell received Academy Award nominations for their performances. The Blue Veil marked the feature film debut of popular radio actor Les Tremayne (1913--2003). In addition to continued work on radio, Tremayne acted in dozens of films and television programs for several decades, appearing both onscreen and as an offscreen narrator. According to modern sources, the picture made $450,000 in profits. On 24 Nov 1952, Wyman reprised her role in a Lux Radio Theatre version of the story. In the radio broadcast, Gloria Blondell, Joan Blondell's sister, played "Annie," the role portrayed by Joan in the film. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27 Oct 1951.
---
Daily Variety
7 Sep 51
p. 3, 12.
Film Daily
10 Sep 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Oct 50
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 50
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Dec 50
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 51
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Mar 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 51
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Apr 51
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 51
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 51
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 51
p. 11.
Look
18 Dec 51
p. 126.
Motion Picture Herald
8 Sep 51
p. 25.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
15 Sep 51
p. 1015.
New York Times
27 Oct 51
p. 10.
Variety
12 Sep 51
p. 6.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Jim Hawkins
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d unit asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
2d unit photog
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost for Charles Laughton
DANCE
Dance dir
MAKEUP
Creation of Miss Wyman's make-up and hair-styling
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the French film Le voile bleu , written by François Campaux (Compaignie Generale Cinematographique, 1942).
SONGS
"Daddy," words and music by Bobby Troup
"There Will Be Some Changes Made," words by Billy Higgins, music by W. Benton Overstreet.
DETAILS
Release Date:
October 1951
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Los Angeles: 5 September 1951
New York opening: 26 October 1951
Production Date:
began 9 April 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Wald-Krasna Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 October 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1311
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
113-114
Length(in feet):
10,241
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15252
SYNOPSIS

In a New York City hospital, just after World War I, Louise "LouLou" Mason learns that her newborn son has died suddenly. Later, LouLou, a war widow, seeks help from an employment agency and reluctantly accepts a temporary job as a nursemaid. Her new boss, corset manufacturer Frederick K. Begley, who lost his wife in childbirth, admits to LouLou that he has found it difficult to love his infant son, Fred, Jr. LouLou quickly ingratiates herself with the Begleys and stays on well past the agreed-upon two-week period. Eventually, the lonely Fred proposes to LouLou, but she gently turns him down, stating that her first duty is to his son. Fred then marries Alicia Torgersen, his secretary, and after their honeymoon, Alicia lets LouLou go. Some time later, LouLou is asked by her new employers, the wealthy Henry and Fleur Palfrey, to meet their eldest son Harrison and his tutor, Jerry Kean, at the train station. Jerry soon tames Harrison, who has been sent home from boarding school because of poor grades and unruly behavior, and impresses LouLou. One day, Jerry learns that he has been offered a job in Beirut and, after attending a farewell party with LouLou in New Haven, impulsively proposes. LouLou accepts and rushes back to the Palfreys to pack and say goodbye to Harrison's young brother Robbie. While waiting for LouLou, Jerry speaks with Fleur, who warns him about marrying in haste. Although Jerry insists he loves LouLou deeply, Fleur plants seeds of doubt in his mind, and on the train to Washington, D.C., Jerry begins to question the wisdom of his decision. Guilt-ridden ... +


In a New York City hospital, just after World War I, Louise "LouLou" Mason learns that her newborn son has died suddenly. Later, LouLou, a war widow, seeks help from an employment agency and reluctantly accepts a temporary job as a nursemaid. Her new boss, corset manufacturer Frederick K. Begley, who lost his wife in childbirth, admits to LouLou that he has found it difficult to love his infant son, Fred, Jr. LouLou quickly ingratiates herself with the Begleys and stays on well past the agreed-upon two-week period. Eventually, the lonely Fred proposes to LouLou, but she gently turns him down, stating that her first duty is to his son. Fred then marries Alicia Torgersen, his secretary, and after their honeymoon, Alicia lets LouLou go. Some time later, LouLou is asked by her new employers, the wealthy Henry and Fleur Palfrey, to meet their eldest son Harrison and his tutor, Jerry Kean, at the train station. Jerry soon tames Harrison, who has been sent home from boarding school because of poor grades and unruly behavior, and impresses LouLou. One day, Jerry learns that he has been offered a job in Beirut and, after attending a farewell party with LouLou in New Haven, impulsively proposes. LouLou accepts and rushes back to the Palfreys to pack and say goodbye to Harrison's young brother Robbie. While waiting for LouLou, Jerry speaks with Fleur, who warns him about marrying in haste. Although Jerry insists he loves LouLou deeply, Fleur plants seeds of doubt in his mind, and on the train to Washington, D.C., Jerry begins to question the wisdom of his decision. Guilt-ridden about leaving Robbie, LouLou gives in to her own apprehensions, and after the two agree to wait a few months, she returns to the Palfreys. Years later, LouLou is nursemaid to Stephanie Rawlins, the twelve-year-old daughter of aging entertainer Annie Rawlins. On the eve of Stephanie's confirmation, Annie learns that she has been replaced in her current show by a younger actress, but has a chance to tour in another play. Although Annie promises Stephanie that she will be done with her audition before the confirmation, she is delayed. Annie is cast, but misses the ceremony, and outside the church, a disappointed Stephanie tells her friends that LouLou is her mother. That afternoon LouLou sadly informs Annie that she is quitting because Stephanie has become too attached to her. Heeding LouLou's advice to spend more time with her daughter, Annie turns down the role, but Stephanie is heartbroken over LouLou's departure. Some years later, on the eve of World War II, LouLou accepts a job caring for the infant of a young couple, Helen and Hugh Williams. An unenthusiastic parent, Helen panics at the thought of the English Hugh joining the military, and when he later is injured in battle, she heads for England, leaving her son Tony in LouLou's care. After two years, Helen, now a widow, still has not returned and has stopped sending money to LouLou. Despite the financial hardship, LouLou continues to care for Tony. Years pass without word from Helen, and LouLou and Tony bond as mother and son. One day, however, LouLou receives a letter from Helen, informing her that she has remarried and is returning to New York to reclaim Tony. Not wanting to give up Tony, LouLou flees to Florida with him, but is soon apprehended. Faced with kidnapping charges, LouLou defends her actions to the district attorney. Though highly critical of Helen and her new husband, the district attorney is compelled by law to return Tony to his natural mother. LouLou's sorrow is then compounded when she learns that her oldest friend, the Scottish Frank Hutchins, who had just proposed to her, has died. When the now elderly, impoverished LouLou returns to the employment agency, she is told that she is too old to be a nanny but takes a janitorial job in an elementary school to be near children. Troubled by poor eyesight, LouLou visits an ophthalmologist, who turns out to be the now-grown Robbie Palfrey. After LouLou proudly shows Robbie photographs of all her "children," Robbie invites her for dinner the following week. To LouLou's surprise and delight, Robbie has also invited her former charges and their spouses. As LouLou reacquaints herself, Robbie introduces her to his two small children and tells her that she will be their new nanny. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.