Cry Danger (1951)

79 mins | Film noir | 3 February 1951

Director:

Robert Parrish

Writer:

William Bowers

Cinematographer:

Joseph Biroc

Production Designer:

Richard Day

Production Company:

Olympic Productions, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

According to a May 1948 HR news item, the rights to Jerome Cady's screen story were first purchased by Santana Pictures, a company owned by actor Humphrey Bogart and producer Robert Lord. Columbia was announced as the film's distributor at that time. Cry Danger marked the first feature-film directing credit for Robert Parrish, a former editor and actor. Olympic Productions, which was owned by Sam Wiesenthal and W. R. Frank, borrowed Rhonda Fleming from David O. Selznick's company for the production. Cry Danger was the only film made under that banner. Much of the picture was shot in and around downtown Los Angeles, CA, including Union Station and Bunker ... More Less

According to a May 1948 HR news item, the rights to Jerome Cady's screen story were first purchased by Santana Pictures, a company owned by actor Humphrey Bogart and producer Robert Lord. Columbia was announced as the film's distributor at that time. Cry Danger marked the first feature-film directing credit for Robert Parrish, a former editor and actor. Olympic Productions, which was owned by Sam Wiesenthal and W. R. Frank, borrowed Rhonda Fleming from David O. Selznick's company for the production. Cry Danger was the only film made under that banner. Much of the picture was shot in and around downtown Los Angeles, CA, including Union Station and Bunker Hill. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
10 Feb 1951.
---
Daily Variety
31 Jan 51
p. 3.
Film Daily
2 Feb 51
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
26 May 1948.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 50
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jun 50
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jun 50
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jun 50
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 50
p. 2, 17
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jun 50
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 50
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 50
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jan 51
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
10 Feb 51
p. 706.
New York Times
22 Feb 51
p. 27.
Variety
7 Feb 51
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Wiesenthal-Frank Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
From a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward des
Men's ward
MUSIC
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Asst to prod
Casting dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Cry Danger," music by Hugo Friedhofer, lyrics by Leon Pober.
DETAILS
Release Date:
3 February 1951
Production Date:
9 June--late June 1950 at General Service Studios
addl scenes 26 July--early August 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Olympic Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
31 December 1950
Copyright Number:
LP788
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
79
Length(in feet):
7,101
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
14738
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As he steps out of Los Angeles' Union Station, ex-convict Rocky Mulloy, fresh from serving five years of a life sentence for robbery and murder, is greeted by Lt. Gus Cobb, the detective responsible for his incarceration. With Gus is Delong, the decorated, disabled Marine who provided Rocky with the alibi that finally freed him. The cynical Gus invites Rocky and Delong for a drink, and at the bar, Delong explains that, because he shipped out the day after the holdup, he was unaware that Rocky, with whom he and some other Marines had been drinking the night before, was in trouble. Despite Delong's statements, Gus remains convinced that Rocky committed the robbery and informs him that he will be following Rocky until he leads him to the holdup money, which was never recovered. Once alone with Rocky, the alcoholic Delong admits that he concocted the alibi, hoping that the grateful ex-convict would share some of his loot with him. Rocky repeats that he did not commit the robbery, but knows who did and intends to find the money. Delong accompanies Rocky to a trailer park, where Nancy Morgan, the wife of his best friend Danny, who was also found guilty of the holdup and is still in prison, lives. Rocky and Delong rent a trailer near Nancy's, and she is thrilled to reunite with Rocky, with whom she was once romantically involved. That night, Rocky goes to see racketeer Louie Castro, who engineered the holdup, and accuses him of a frame-up. The gun-wielding Rocky demands that Castro pay him $50,000, the amount Castro had offered him to participate in the holdup, but Castro ... +


As he steps out of Los Angeles' Union Station, ex-convict Rocky Mulloy, fresh from serving five years of a life sentence for robbery and murder, is greeted by Lt. Gus Cobb, the detective responsible for his incarceration. With Gus is Delong, the decorated, disabled Marine who provided Rocky with the alibi that finally freed him. The cynical Gus invites Rocky and Delong for a drink, and at the bar, Delong explains that, because he shipped out the day after the holdup, he was unaware that Rocky, with whom he and some other Marines had been drinking the night before, was in trouble. Despite Delong's statements, Gus remains convinced that Rocky committed the robbery and informs him that he will be following Rocky until he leads him to the holdup money, which was never recovered. Once alone with Rocky, the alcoholic Delong admits that he concocted the alibi, hoping that the grateful ex-convict would share some of his loot with him. Rocky repeats that he did not commit the robbery, but knows who did and intends to find the money. Delong accompanies Rocky to a trailer park, where Nancy Morgan, the wife of his best friend Danny, who was also found guilty of the holdup and is still in prison, lives. Rocky and Delong rent a trailer near Nancy's, and she is thrilled to reunite with Rocky, with whom she was once romantically involved. That night, Rocky goes to see racketeer Louie Castro, who engineered the holdup, and accuses him of a frame-up. The gun-wielding Rocky demands that Castro pay him $50,000, the amount Castro had offered him to participate in the holdup, but Castro refuses. Instead, Castro gives Rocky $500 with which to place a bet on a fixed horserace running the next day. Later, at the trailer park, Rocky is shot at by an unseen assailant, and the still-enamored Nancy begs Rocky to drop the matter. Rocky dismisses Nancy's concerns and goes to see Arthur Fletcher, a witness who provided damning testimony during Rocky's trial. From Fletcher's wife Alice, Rocky learns that the now-dead Fletcher received $5,000 shortly after the trial and assumes that Castro bribed him. Following Castro's directions, Rocky then places his bet with a bookie named Harry and the longshot horse wins. Rocky's instant cash flow soon dries up when Gus reveals that the money is stolen. To prove his innocence, Rocky takes Gus to Harry's place, but the bookie operation has completely disappeared. In Rocky's presence, Gus telephones Castro and asks him if he has seen Rocky recently. When Castro claims that he has not, Gus, who has been following Rocky, knows that he is lying but is still reluctant to believe Rocky's story. Soon after, at the trailer park, Delong and his girl friend Darlene are mistaken for Rocky and Nancy by Castro's thugs and are shot in a hail of bullets. Darlene is killed instantly and the wounded Delong is rushed to the hospital. Gus brings Rocky and the shaken Nancy in for questioning with Castro, but cannot coerce them to admit anything. Later, an incensed Rocky finds Castro in his office and forces him at gunpoint to lie down on the desk. He then plays Russian roulette with Castro until he admits where his half of the loot is hidden. The terrorized Castro also reveals that Nancy has the other half, as Danny, unlike Rocky, agreed to participate in the holdup and committed the murder. After Rocky tricks Castro into calling his men to his office, he notifies the police. As the thugs and the police engage in a shoot-out, Rocky informs Gus where to find Castro's half of the money. At the trailer park, Rocky then confronts Nancy, who admits that she has the money but insists that she kept silent about it only because she was afraid of Castro. Nancy also confesses to shooting at Rocky to stop his snooping. Declaring that she has always loved him, Nancy begs Rocky to run away with her. Rocky agrees, but as soon as he leaves her trailer, he tells Gus about Nancy's deception and walks quietly away. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.