I'll See You In My Dreams (1952)

109-110 or 113 mins | Biography, Musical | 12 January 1952

Director:

Michael Curtiz

Producer:

Louis F. Edelman

Cinematographer:

Ted McCord

Editor:

Owen Marks

Production Designer:

Douglas Bacon

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of the film was Wish I Had a Girl . Gus Kahn was born in Germany in 1886 and at the age of five moved to the United States with his parents. As depicted in the film, at various times he was a songwriting partner of composers Egbert Van Alstyne, Isham Jones and Walter Donaldson. He died in 1941. Although CBCS lists James Gleason's character as Fred Thompson, he is called Townsend in the picture. According to an HR news item, Margaret Thomas, Danny Thomas' thirteen-year-old daughter, was to enact one of "Gus Kahn's" daughters, but her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Doris Day sang the tune "Love Me or Leave Me" when she played Ruth Etting in M-G-M's 1955 film Love Me Or Leave Me (See Entry). Although Etting performed the song in the Broadway musical Whoopee! , the fictional character "Gloria Knight" is portrayed as the star of Whoopee! in I'll See You in My Dreams .
       Warner Bros. purchased the rights to many of Gus Kahn's songs, which were frequently performed or heard as background music in Warner Bros. films of the 1930s and 1940s. On 13 Apr 1952, LAEx reported that Walter Donaldson's widow Dorothy was suing Warner Bros. and Intermountain Theaters for $450,000, charging that the movie portrayed Donaldson as a "gambler, rake, lover of wild parties and promoter of marital discords." She sought to have the picture withdrawn from circulation on behalf of hers and Donaldson's daughters. The final disposition of the suit is ... More Less

The working title of the film was Wish I Had a Girl . Gus Kahn was born in Germany in 1886 and at the age of five moved to the United States with his parents. As depicted in the film, at various times he was a songwriting partner of composers Egbert Van Alstyne, Isham Jones and Walter Donaldson. He died in 1941. Although CBCS lists James Gleason's character as Fred Thompson, he is called Townsend in the picture. According to an HR news item, Margaret Thomas, Danny Thomas' thirteen-year-old daughter, was to enact one of "Gus Kahn's" daughters, but her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Doris Day sang the tune "Love Me or Leave Me" when she played Ruth Etting in M-G-M's 1955 film Love Me Or Leave Me (See Entry). Although Etting performed the song in the Broadway musical Whoopee! , the fictional character "Gloria Knight" is portrayed as the star of Whoopee! in I'll See You in My Dreams .
       Warner Bros. purchased the rights to many of Gus Kahn's songs, which were frequently performed or heard as background music in Warner Bros. films of the 1930s and 1940s. On 13 Apr 1952, LAEx reported that Walter Donaldson's widow Dorothy was suing Warner Bros. and Intermountain Theaters for $450,000, charging that the movie portrayed Donaldson as a "gambler, rake, lover of wild parties and promoter of marital discords." She sought to have the picture withdrawn from circulation on behalf of hers and Donaldson's daughters. The final disposition of the suit is undetermined. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
15 Dec 1951.
---
Daily Variety
6 Dec 51
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 Dec 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Aug 51
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Dec 51
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
4 Apr 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
8 Dec 51
p. 1133.
New York Times
5 Dec 51
p. 47.
New York Times
7 Dec 51
p. 35.
Variety
12 Dec 51
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Mus numbers staged and dir by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Wish I Had a Girl," words by Gus Kahn, music by Grace LeBoy
"Memories," words by Gus Kahn, music by Egbert Van Alstyne
"Pretty Baby," words by Gus Kahn, music by Egbert Van Alstyne, Tony Jackson
+
SONGS
"I Wish I Had a Girl," words by Gus Kahn, music by Grace LeBoy
"Memories," words by Gus Kahn, music by Egbert Van Alstyne
"Pretty Baby," words by Gus Kahn, music by Egbert Van Alstyne, Tony Jackson
"The One I Love Belongs to Somebody Else," "It Had to Be You," "Swingin' Down the Lane" and "I'll See You in My Dreams," words by Gus Kahn, music by Isham Jones
"My Buddy," "Carolina in the Morning," "Love Me or Leave Me," "Makin' Whoopee!" and "Yes Sir, That's My Baby," words by Gus Kahn, music by Walter Donaldson
"Nobody's Sweetheart," words by Gus Kahn, music by Ernie Erdman, Billy Meyers, Elmer Schoebel
"No, No, Nora," words by Gus Kahn, music by Ernie Erdman and Ted Fiorito
"Your Eyes Have Told Me So," words by Gus Kahn, music by Walter Blaufuss, Egbert Van Alstyne
"Ukelele Lady," words by Gus Kahn, music by Richard Whiting
"Shine On, Harvest Moon," words by Jack Norworth, music by Nora Bayes and Jack Norworth.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Wish I Had a Girl
Release Date:
12 January 1952
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 5 December 1951
Production Date:
late July--mid September 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 December 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1394
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
109-110 or 113
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15451
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Chicago in 1908, aspiring lyricist Gus Kahn begs music company clerk Grace LeBoy to read some lyrics he has written. Although she brusquely dismisses him, he finally persuades her to look at them, and she advises him that the trick to writing a good lyric is to remember that most popular songs give people a way to say "I love you." Later that evening, Gus, having taken her advice to heart, appears unexpectedly at the house where Grace lives with her parents. The LeBoys invite him to stay to dinner, and while Gus eats, Mr. LeBoy recites from "Songs from the Portuguese" by Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Feeling deeply inferior, Gus departs, leaving his new lyric with Grace, who likes it enough to set it to music. She then offers the song to her boss, but when he refuses to listen to it, she quits her job and sells the song, "I Wish I Had a Girl," to Fred Townsend. With Grace plugging the tune, it sells briskly, but the team's subsequent songs are not as successful. When Townsend suggests that Gus team up with composer Egbert Van Alstyne, he refuses out of loyalty to Grace, until she persuades him of the composer's superior talents by pretending to have written one of Van Alstyne's melodies. Sometime after tenor John McCormack introduces Gus and Van Alstyne's song "Memories," the shy Gus finally gets up the courage to propose to Grace, and the two are married. When Grace announces her pregnancy, Gus entitles a song "Pretty Baby," in her honor. With new composer Isham Jones, Gus goes on to write lyrics for many ... +


In Chicago in 1908, aspiring lyricist Gus Kahn begs music company clerk Grace LeBoy to read some lyrics he has written. Although she brusquely dismisses him, he finally persuades her to look at them, and she advises him that the trick to writing a good lyric is to remember that most popular songs give people a way to say "I love you." Later that evening, Gus, having taken her advice to heart, appears unexpectedly at the house where Grace lives with her parents. The LeBoys invite him to stay to dinner, and while Gus eats, Mr. LeBoy recites from "Songs from the Portuguese" by Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Feeling deeply inferior, Gus departs, leaving his new lyric with Grace, who likes it enough to set it to music. She then offers the song to her boss, but when he refuses to listen to it, she quits her job and sells the song, "I Wish I Had a Girl," to Fred Townsend. With Grace plugging the tune, it sells briskly, but the team's subsequent songs are not as successful. When Townsend suggests that Gus team up with composer Egbert Van Alstyne, he refuses out of loyalty to Grace, until she persuades him of the composer's superior talents by pretending to have written one of Van Alstyne's melodies. Sometime after tenor John McCormack introduces Gus and Van Alstyne's song "Memories," the shy Gus finally gets up the courage to propose to Grace, and the two are married. When Grace announces her pregnancy, Gus entitles a song "Pretty Baby," in her honor. With new composer Isham Jones, Gus goes on to write lyrics for many memorable songs, but when Townsend refuses to publish "The One I Love Belongs to Somebody Else," Grace sings it to impresario Sam Harris, who buys it for his new show. Grace and Gus have a baby boy, whom they name Donald, and Gus temporarily leaves song writing to fight in World War I. After the war, Grace again becomes pregnant, and this time gives birth to a girl, Irene. Gus's reputation grows, and showman Florenz Ziegfeld asks him to write a show. Gus refuses, as he does not want to leave Chicago for New York, but Grace again intervenes and accepts the offer for him. Gus does not immediately get along with Walter Donaldson, the show's composer, but manages to write a lyric for "Carolina in the Morning," while sitting with Donaldson and his girl friend, Frankie Mason, at the race track. However, Gloria Knight, the Ziegfeld star who will sing the number in the show, dislikes the song and decides to teach Gus about sophistication. The result is "Love Me or Leave Me," which Gus has Gloria sing over the phone to Grace in Chicago. When the new show, Whoopee! , opens, Grace makes a surprise visit to New York, where Gloria assures her that despite her efforts to seduce Gus, he cares for no one but his family. Sometime later, Gus and Donaldson quarrel and end their partnership. After the stock market crash of 1929, Gus cannot get work and Grace encourages Gus to call Townsend in Hollywood, where he now works. Gus's pride will not allow him to beg for work, but as usual, Grace takes matters into her own hands, and Gus soon leaves for California. The effort to conform to a formulaic approach to movie music makes him so unhappy that he has a heart attack. Grace flies out and encourages him to keep working, even though his doctor has warned him to take it easy for health reasons. Gus still cannot find a composer he likes, so Grace sends for Donaldson, and reunited, the team writes "I'll See You in My Dreams." In 1939, Donaldson throws a testimonial dinner for Gus, who thanks Grace for her help in his career, and publicly tells her how much her loves her. The audience then asks Gus to sing the first song he ever wrote, and when he claims that he cannot remember it, Grace pulls out his handwritten lyric for "I Wish I Had a Girl," which she had saved all through the years. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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