Meet Me After the Show (1951)

86 mins | Musical comedy | August 1951

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Don't Fence Me In . As the opening title cards appear, an offscreen chorus sings "Ladies and gentlemen, Twentieth Century-Fox presents Betty Grable, Macdonald Carey in Meet Me After the Show , baby, meet me after the show." According to a modern source, Cary Grant was originally considered for the male lead, and Betty Grable suggested Dale Robertson for the part of "David Hemingway." On 11 Nov 1950, LAEx reported that Rod Cameron and John Lund had been cast as Grable's co-stars. Although HR news items include the following actors and dancers in the cast, their appearance in the completed picture has not been confirmed: Snub Pollard, Bernard Elmore, Joe Evans, Al Klein, George Boyce, Joe Niemeyer, Jess Mendelson, Jack Fisher, Bob Schwartz, Herman Boden, Malcolm Breener, John Weideman, Gordon Hanson, J. C. Tedlie and Frank Radcliffe. HR news items also announced that Dave Hudkins and his band and Bernie Billing's Dixieland Band had been signed for musical numbers, but their appearance in the released film also has not been confirmed.
       Noted dancer Gwen Verdon, who was often credited as Gwyneth Verdon on 1950s CBCS, did not receive an onscreen credit for Meet Me After the Show , but was listed in a program for the final production number, which reads, "Delilah Lee and Dancers with Gwen Verdon." According to a modern source, Metropolitan Opera star Robert Weede served as Macdonald Carey's and Eddie Albert's vocal ... More Less

The working title of this film was Don't Fence Me In . As the opening title cards appear, an offscreen chorus sings "Ladies and gentlemen, Twentieth Century-Fox presents Betty Grable, Macdonald Carey in Meet Me After the Show , baby, meet me after the show." According to a modern source, Cary Grant was originally considered for the male lead, and Betty Grable suggested Dale Robertson for the part of "David Hemingway." On 11 Nov 1950, LAEx reported that Rod Cameron and John Lund had been cast as Grable's co-stars. Although HR news items include the following actors and dancers in the cast, their appearance in the completed picture has not been confirmed: Snub Pollard, Bernard Elmore, Joe Evans, Al Klein, George Boyce, Joe Niemeyer, Jess Mendelson, Jack Fisher, Bob Schwartz, Herman Boden, Malcolm Breener, John Weideman, Gordon Hanson, J. C. Tedlie and Frank Radcliffe. HR news items also announced that Dave Hudkins and his band and Bernie Billing's Dixieland Band had been signed for musical numbers, but their appearance in the released film also has not been confirmed.
       Noted dancer Gwen Verdon, who was often credited as Gwyneth Verdon on 1950s CBCS, did not receive an onscreen credit for Meet Me After the Show , but was listed in a program for the final production number, which reads, "Delilah Lee and Dancers with Gwen Verdon." According to a modern source, Metropolitan Opera star Robert Weede served as Macdonald Carey's and Eddie Albert's vocal coach. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
11 Aug 1951.
---
Daily Variety
20 Oct 1950.
---
Daily Variety
3 Aug 51
p. 3.
Film Daily
7 Aug 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Nov 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 50
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 50
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jan 51
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jan 51
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 51
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Feb 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Feb 51
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Feb 51
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 51
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 51
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Mar 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 51
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 51
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Aug 51
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
11 Nov 1950.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Aug 1951.
---
Motion Picture Daily
3 Aug 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
4 Aug 51
p. 965.
New York Times
15 Aug 51
p. 23.
New York Times
16 Aug 51
p. 23.
Variety
3 Aug 51
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Fill-In dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Wrt
Suggested by a story by
Suggested by a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward dir
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus dir
Vocal dir
Betty Grable's composer
Betty Grable's vocal coach
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Dances staged by
Dance dir
Asst dance dir
Betty Grable's dance instructor
Dance mgr
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"Meet Me After the Show," "Bettin' on a Man," "(Ev'ry Day Is Like) A Day in Maytime," "It's a Hot Night in Alaska," "No Talent Joe" and "I Feel Like Dancing," music and lyrics by Jule Styne and Leo Robin
"Miami," music and lyrics by Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Don't Fence Me In
Release Date:
August 1951
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 15 August 1951
Los Angeles opening: 21 August 1951
Production Date:
14 December 1950--21 February 1951
dance seq 8 March--mid April 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
15 August 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1211
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
86
Length(in feet):
7,770
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15084
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Broadway star Delilah Lee deeply loves her husband, producer-director Jeffrey Ames, but is tired of the widely circulated story that Jeff discovered her in a seedy Miami nightclub and transformed her into a classy entertainer. Jeff, who is so busy that he neglects his beautiful wife, disparages her superstitious reliance upon her "lucky" garter and declares that she is a success because he made her one. Delilah, whom Jeff calls "Sheba" in private, is still being romantically pursued by singer Chris Leeds, whom she met in Miami one month before she met Jeff, but she gently discourages his attentions. Delilah is infuriated to learn that Jeff lied to her about the backer of their current show, and that the real backer is sexy Gloria Carstairs. When Delilah catches Gloria giving Jeff a steamy kiss, she files for divorce, and Jeff is served with the papers during a performance. Jeff complains to his lawyer and friend, Timothy Wayne, who advises him to apologize. Protesting his innocence, Jeff refuses, and later, Delilah tells Tim that she and Jeff have drifted apart, and that Jeff was obsessed with changing her. Tim urges Delilah to rediscover the things that made her and Jeff fall in love, and tells her about an amnesiac who fell in love with him. With neither Jeff nor Delilah willing to apologize, their case is brought to court, where the judge awards Delilah $2,500 a month in maintenance. The irate Jeff is further antagonized when Delilah, hoping to get him to capitulate, arranges for a doctor's excuse to get her out of her contract with the show. With Delilah not ... +


Broadway star Delilah Lee deeply loves her husband, producer-director Jeffrey Ames, but is tired of the widely circulated story that Jeff discovered her in a seedy Miami nightclub and transformed her into a classy entertainer. Jeff, who is so busy that he neglects his beautiful wife, disparages her superstitious reliance upon her "lucky" garter and declares that she is a success because he made her one. Delilah, whom Jeff calls "Sheba" in private, is still being romantically pursued by singer Chris Leeds, whom she met in Miami one month before she met Jeff, but she gently discourages his attentions. Delilah is infuriated to learn that Jeff lied to her about the backer of their current show, and that the real backer is sexy Gloria Carstairs. When Delilah catches Gloria giving Jeff a steamy kiss, she files for divorce, and Jeff is served with the papers during a performance. Jeff complains to his lawyer and friend, Timothy Wayne, who advises him to apologize. Protesting his innocence, Jeff refuses, and later, Delilah tells Tim that she and Jeff have drifted apart, and that Jeff was obsessed with changing her. Tim urges Delilah to rediscover the things that made her and Jeff fall in love, and tells her about an amnesiac who fell in love with him. With neither Jeff nor Delilah willing to apologize, their case is brought to court, where the judge awards Delilah $2,500 a month in maintenance. The irate Jeff is further antagonized when Delilah, hoping to get him to capitulate, arranges for a doctor's excuse to get her out of her contract with the show. With Delilah not performing, the show loses money and Jeff falls behind in his alimony. Hoping to prove that Delilah is not ill and can return to work, Jeff takes her out to a nightclub and tricks her into singing. Delilah, who had been hoping for a reconciliation, is crushed when she uncovers Jeff's ruse and has him arrested for failing to pay the alimony. Tim bails Jeff out of jail, and Jeff bitterly declares that he will engineer a marriage between Delilah and Chris to end his alimony payments. Jeff assures Chris that he is going to divorce Delilah, but as they are talking, they learn that Delilah has been injured in a car accident. They race to the doctor's office and learn that Delilah suffered a concussion and might have amnesia. Delilah has fled, however, and when Jeff goes to her apartment, he learns that she did not recognize her maid Tillie and then left town. Jeff and Chris discover that under her original name, Kitty Lee, Delilah has gone to Miami, and they follow on the next plane. After a long search, they find Delilah singing in her old nightclub and acting as if she has no memory of the previous seven years. Delilah does remember Chris but Jeff is upset when she does not remember him and ignores him. Suspecting that Delilah is faking, Jeff keeps a close eye on her and is annoyed when she dates David Hemingway, a good-looking but unambitious yachtsman. The next night, Jeff apologizes to Delilah for his earlier behavior, but when she is baffled by his pronouncement, he is convinced that her amnesia is genuine. Delilah then accepts Davey's marriage proposal, and Jeff, desperate to forestall the wedding, promises to get her a job at Miami's biggest hotel. Delilah agrees to postpone the wedding, and her opening night at the hotel is a smash. Delilah's exuberant performance makes Jeff realize that her stardom is the result of her talent, not his, and that she would have been a star regardless of his help. Determined to win her back, Jeff is horrified when Delilah announces that she is leaving with Davey in the morning, and that she wants him and Chris to accompany them to give her away. In the morning, the trio board Davey's tiny "yacht," and when Jeff ridicules the boat, Delilah finally slips up and reveals that she has been faking her amnesia. Davey tries to sock Jeff for insulting Delilah but winds up in the water, and when Jeff dives in to rescue him, Delilah accidentally hits him on the head with an oar. Later, at the hospital, Delilah and Chris learn that Jeff is suffering from a real case of amnesia. Delilah is grief-stricken, and over the next few weeks, lovingly tends to Jeff while his memory slowly returns. On the night that the show re-opens, Delilah wishes that Jeff would once again call her Sheba, and he watches from the wings as she performs. When the finale is over, Jeff embraces Delilah and calls her Sheba, and with his health restored, happily joins her onstage for a curtain call. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.