Operation Pacific (1951)

109-111 mins | Drama | 27 January 1951

Director:

George Waggner

Writer:

George Waggner

Producer:

Louis F. Edelman

Cinematographer:

Bert Glennon

Production Designer:

Leo Kuter

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film begins with the following written foreword: "When the Pacific Fleet was destroyed by the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, it remained for the submarines to carry the war to the enemy. In the four years that followed our undersea craft sank six million tons of Japanese shipping including some of the proudest ships of the imperial navy. Fifty-two of our submarines and thirty-five hundred men were lost. It is to these men and the entire silent service that this picture is humbly dedicated." It ends with with the following statement: "To the United States Navy for its aid and cooperation in making this picture possible our grateful thanks." George Waggner's onscreen credit reads: "Written and directed by George Waggner." This film marked the first screen appearance of actor Philip Carey (1925--2009). Operation Pacific received a merit citation from the Southern California Motion Picture ... More Less

The film begins with the following written foreword: "When the Pacific Fleet was destroyed by the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, it remained for the submarines to carry the war to the enemy. In the four years that followed our undersea craft sank six million tons of Japanese shipping including some of the proudest ships of the imperial navy. Fifty-two of our submarines and thirty-five hundred men were lost. It is to these men and the entire silent service that this picture is humbly dedicated." It ends with with the following statement: "To the United States Navy for its aid and cooperation in making this picture possible our grateful thanks." George Waggner's onscreen credit reads: "Written and directed by George Waggner." This film marked the first screen appearance of actor Philip Carey (1925--2009). Operation Pacific received a merit citation from the Southern California Motion Picture Council. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
13 Jan 1951.
---
Daily Variety
9 Jan 51
p. 3.
Film Daily
10 Jan 51
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 50
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Aug 50
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Sep 50
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Oct 50
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jan 51
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Feb 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 Jan 51
p. 661.
New York Times
3 Feb 51
p. 10.
Variety
10 Jan 51
p. 13.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff dir
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
SONGS
"Round, White and Ruby Red," music by Ray Heindorf, lyrics by George Waggner.
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 January 1951
Production Date:
29 August--late October 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 January 1951
Copyright Number:
LP612
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
109-111
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
14874
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At night, in a quiet bay in the South Pacific, submarine officer "Duke" Gifford watches as a group of children and nuns is loaded onto rafts and transported aboard the submarine Thunderfish . While the children, which include a newborn infant nicknamed "Butch," are fed, a Japanese aircraft carrier is sighted, and the crew springs to action. Although the American torpedoes hit the enemy ship, they fail to fire, and the Japanese, now alerted to the submarine's presence, attack. The crew of the Thunderfish evades the enemy depth charges and sets course for Pearl Harbor. In the quiet that follows, Capt. "Pop" Perry asks Duke if he has heard from his ex-wife, Mary Stuart, who is now living in Honolulu. Duke reminisces about their divorce, blaming his dedication to work for the fact that he was at sea for both the birth and death of their son. After the Thunderfish arrives in port, Duke visits Butch at the hospital and by accident, encounters Mary, who is now a Navy nurse. The two still care deeply for each other, and share a passionate kiss, but when Duke asks if they can make a fresh start, Mary replies that she has a date with Navy pilot Bob Perry, Pop's brother. Later, Duke, Pop, Mary and Bob encounter one another at same restaurant. Bob, who has always felt overshadowed by Duke's exploits, announces that he and Mary are engaged to be married. Although Mary admits that she has not actually consented, when Duke tries to force a confrontation, she leaves with Bob. Duke follows with flowers, ... +


At night, in a quiet bay in the South Pacific, submarine officer "Duke" Gifford watches as a group of children and nuns is loaded onto rafts and transported aboard the submarine Thunderfish . While the children, which include a newborn infant nicknamed "Butch," are fed, a Japanese aircraft carrier is sighted, and the crew springs to action. Although the American torpedoes hit the enemy ship, they fail to fire, and the Japanese, now alerted to the submarine's presence, attack. The crew of the Thunderfish evades the enemy depth charges and sets course for Pearl Harbor. In the quiet that follows, Capt. "Pop" Perry asks Duke if he has heard from his ex-wife, Mary Stuart, who is now living in Honolulu. Duke reminisces about their divorce, blaming his dedication to work for the fact that he was at sea for both the birth and death of their son. After the Thunderfish arrives in port, Duke visits Butch at the hospital and by accident, encounters Mary, who is now a Navy nurse. The two still care deeply for each other, and share a passionate kiss, but when Duke asks if they can make a fresh start, Mary replies that she has a date with Navy pilot Bob Perry, Pop's brother. Later, Duke, Pop, Mary and Bob encounter one another at same restaurant. Bob, who has always felt overshadowed by Duke's exploits, announces that he and Mary are engaged to be married. Although Mary admits that she has not actually consented, when Duke tries to force a confrontation, she leaves with Bob. Duke follows with flowers, and he and Mary talk about their marriage, but before he can finish, Duke is summoned to settle a dispute between some of his crew and a group of Hawaiians. After the conflict is resolved satisfactorily, the Thunderfish is sent back to sea, where the crew again experiences problems with defective torpedoes. Pop is invited to go ashore and help fix the problem, and recommends Duke to head the next patrol. Before they return to port, they spot an enemy freighter. When the torpedoes again fail to explode, the Japanese ship runs up a white flag. Although he is puzzled by the action, Pop orders the submarine to surface and approach the vessel. The ship is a decoy, however, and opens fire on the Thunderfish . Although he knows he will not be able to get below deck in time, the wounded Pop orders the submarine to submerge. Then, under orders from the angry Duke, the crew rams the Japanese ship and sinks it. The crew heads home in their badly damaged submarine, and after a investigation, a service is held for Pop, whose body was never recovered. Bob believes that Duke gave the order to submerge and accuses him of trying to be a hero. Duke explains what really happened, but when Mary tries to sympathize with him, Duke rejects her efforts and adds that his only concern is keeping the crew of the Thunderfish together. After making his case to the commander, Duke and his men work to solve the torpedo problems and eventually achieve success with a new type of firing pin. One day, Duke invites Mary to dinner, but she declines, explaining that their relationship is doomed to fail because he will not let her comfort him when things go wrong. Nursing commander Steele, having overheard the conversation, advises Mary to take Duke as he is. Mary and Duke's problems are still unresolved when the Thunderfish again puts to sea. While tracking down the source of some major explosions, the crew happens upon the Japanese fleet heading for Leyte. Although it will put themselves in great danger, Duke orders the radio man to alert the American forces. They then fire all available torpedoes and, while battered by depth charges, destroy an aircraft carrier. After the U.S. attack begins, Thunderfish is asked to help rescue downed flyers. Under attack from Japanese planes, the men enact the rescues, and Duke is wounded while rescuing Bob. When they again dock in Pearl Harbor, Mary is waiting for Duke, and together they head for the hospital to adopt Butch. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.