Tomorrow Is Another Day (1951)

90 or 92 mins | Melodrama, Romance | 22 September 1951

Director:

Felix E. Feist

Writers:

Art Cohn, Guy Endore

Producer:

Henry Blanke

Cinematographer:

Robert Burks

Production Designer:

Charles H. Clarke

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Spring Kill . According to Aug 1949 HR and Dec 1950 LAT news items, the film is based on a novel of the same name by Guy Endore; however, further information about the novel was not found. A Dec 1951 LAT news item states that Burt Lancaster was originally announced as the male lead. Feb 1951 HR news items add Michael McHale and Lora Dunne to the cast, but their appearance in the finished film has not been confirmed. Portions of the film were shot on location at the Warner Ranch in Calabasas, CA, according to Feb 1951 HR news items.
       Several scenes were shot at locations along Ventura Boulevard in the San Fernando Valley, according to Warner Bros. publicity material and a Feb 1951 HR news item. Locations in El Centro, CA, were also considered, according to a Dec HR news item, but it has not been determined that shooting actually took place there. Warner Bros. publicity material states that Steve Cochran fractured his leg filming the fight scene with Hugh Sanders during the first week of production, and after a short hospital stay, wore a cast for two weeks. The Var review stated that final scenes were reshot after the film's ... More Less

The working title of this film was Spring Kill . According to Aug 1949 HR and Dec 1950 LAT news items, the film is based on a novel of the same name by Guy Endore; however, further information about the novel was not found. A Dec 1951 LAT news item states that Burt Lancaster was originally announced as the male lead. Feb 1951 HR news items add Michael McHale and Lora Dunne to the cast, but their appearance in the finished film has not been confirmed. Portions of the film were shot on location at the Warner Ranch in Calabasas, CA, according to Feb 1951 HR news items.
       Several scenes were shot at locations along Ventura Boulevard in the San Fernando Valley, according to Warner Bros. publicity material and a Feb 1951 HR news item. Locations in El Centro, CA, were also considered, according to a Dec HR news item, but it has not been determined that shooting actually took place there. Warner Bros. publicity material states that Steve Cochran fractured his leg filming the fight scene with Hugh Sanders during the first week of production, and after a short hospital stay, wore a cast for two weeks. The Var review stated that final scenes were reshot after the film's preview. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18 Aug 1951.
---
Daily Variety
9 Aug 51
p. 3.
Film Daily
13 Aug 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 50
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Dec 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Dec 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jan 51
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 51
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Feb 51
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Feb 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Feb 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Mar 51
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Aug 51
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
15 Dec 1950.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 Aug 51
p. 973.
New York Times
8 Aug 51
p. 21.
New York Times
9 Aug 51
p. 17.
Variety
15 Aug 51
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Scr
From a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Fill-in dir of photog
Stills
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Props
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Spring Kill
Release Date:
22 September 1951
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 8 August 1951
Production Date:
3 January--early March 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 September 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1155
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90 or 92
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15122
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Having served eighteen years in prison for killing his father, Bill Clark is a free man, but finds the outside lonely and bewildering. After he is betrayed by a friendly man who turns out to be a newspaper reporter looking for a scoop, Bill heads for New York City to avoid the attention generated by a sensational article that identifies him as having been the state's youngest murderer at the age of thirteen. Bill makes a tentative friendship with a platinum blonde taxi dancer, Catherine, who shows him around the city, but her boyfriend, George Conover, finds them at her apartment and starts a fight. Bill is knocked out, then Catherine accidentally shoots George in self-defense, but later leads Bill to believe that he did the shooting. They flee the city after learning from a radio broadcast that George, a police detective, died from the wound. Forming an uneasy alliance, Bill and Catherine borrow her brother's car to get over the state line, then stow away in a truck hauling automobiles across country. At a motel, after checking in as "Mike and Nikki Lewis," they decide to marry using the assumed names. To assist with their disguise, Catherine dyes her hair back to brunette. Although mutual trust is slow to develop, their passion for each other grows. Finally, while waiting to hop a train, Bill tells Catherine how, at the age of thirteen, he passed out while defending his mother from one of his father's brutal beatings, and awakened to find him shot dead. Unable to express remorse for the death of his father, Bill's honest relief was mistaken as coldbloodedness by the jury, who passed a guilty verdict ... +


Having served eighteen years in prison for killing his father, Bill Clark is a free man, but finds the outside lonely and bewildering. After he is betrayed by a friendly man who turns out to be a newspaper reporter looking for a scoop, Bill heads for New York City to avoid the attention generated by a sensational article that identifies him as having been the state's youngest murderer at the age of thirteen. Bill makes a tentative friendship with a platinum blonde taxi dancer, Catherine, who shows him around the city, but her boyfriend, George Conover, finds them at her apartment and starts a fight. Bill is knocked out, then Catherine accidentally shoots George in self-defense, but later leads Bill to believe that he did the shooting. They flee the city after learning from a radio broadcast that George, a police detective, died from the wound. Forming an uneasy alliance, Bill and Catherine borrow her brother's car to get over the state line, then stow away in a truck hauling automobiles across country. At a motel, after checking in as "Mike and Nikki Lewis," they decide to marry using the assumed names. To assist with their disguise, Catherine dyes her hair back to brunette. Although mutual trust is slow to develop, their passion for each other grows. Finally, while waiting to hop a train, Bill tells Catherine how, at the age of thirteen, he passed out while defending his mother from one of his father's brutal beatings, and awakened to find him shot dead. Unable to express remorse for the death of his father, Bill's honest relief was mistaken as coldbloodedness by the jury, who passed a guilty verdict in spite of his youth. With no destination in mind, Bill and Catherine continue to work their way west, and hitch a ride with Henry and Stella Dawson and their young son Johnny, who are on their way to Salinas, California, to work in the lettuce fields. After being convinced to join them, Bill and Catherine set up in one of the cottages provided for the workers. Although they remain wary of the law, they find happiness in the hard work and community of laborers. When Bill is offered a welding job which will begin after the harvest season and Catherine learns that she is pregnant, they seem content. Then Johnny finds a picture of Bill in a pulp magazine article about murderers, which offers a sizable reward for his capture. Although the Dawsons are fond of Bill and Catherine, Henry considers turning in Bill until Stella convinces him that they do not want "that kind of money." Bill is unaware of the Dawsons' discovery, but perceives a change in the Dawsons' behavior toward him, and feeling distrustful, backs out of a fishing trip with Henry. Later, Bill's sense of paranoia increases when he sees police at the Dawsons' cottage, and even after Stella tells Catherine that Henry's car has collided with an oil truck, his wariness does not completely diminish. Upon learning that Henry needs expensive medical treatment in Los Angeles for burns suffered in the crash, Stella reluctantly alerts the police about Bill hoping to get the reward money. Meanwhile, Bill and Catherine panic watching more police activity outside the Dawsons' cottage, and Catherine finally tells him that it was she who shot George. Disbelieving, Bill plans to escape at all costs, and when the sheriff arrives at their door, Bill is armed with a scythe. To keep him from getting into more trouble, Catherine disables Bill by shooting him in the shoulder and Bill is taken into custody. Trying to protect each other, both Bill and Catherine confess to killing George, but after listening to their stories, the New York district attorney finally tells them that George made a statement before he died, claiming that Catherine shot him in self-defense. Although their disappearance looked at first suspicious to the police, he explains, they were not being pursued until the pulp magazine printed the "half-cocked" story and created a need to clear up the misunderstanding. With the case closed, Bill and Catherine are free to resume their new life together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.