Two Tickets to Broadway (1951)

106 mins | Musical | November 1951

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HISTORY

In the scene in which the acrobatics of the French group The Charlivels is shown, slow motion photography is used. HR news items add the following information about the production: In Sep 1949, Ken Englund was announced as the film's scriptwriter and Alex Gottlieb as producer. Englund's contribution to the final film, if any, has not been determined. In Apr 1950, production was delayed for five months while a leading man was secured. Gottlieb was replaced as producer by Danny Dare in May, but in mid-Aug 1950, Dare left the production because of prior commitments. RKO head Howard Hughes then took over as producer. RKO borrowed Janet Leigh and Ann Miller from M-G-M. Dancers Marge and Gower Champion, who were also borrowed from M-G-M, coached Leigh during the delay. Virginia Carroll and Manny Harmon were announced as cast members, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Shirley Whitney, who plays a "girl" in the film, originally was hired as Janet Leigh's stand-in. Exterior street scenes were shot on Paramount's back lot. In mid-Jan 1951, production moved from RKO's Gower Street studios to the RKO-Pathé Studios in Culver City, CA.
       Two Tickets to Broadway marked the screen debut of actress Vera Miles. It also marked the first time that Miles and Leigh, who played sisters in Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film Psycho (See Entry), appeared together. The film received an Academy Award nomination for Best Sound Recording. Modern sources note that the picture lost $1,150,000 at the box office. Modern sources also state that during production, Hughes ordered the sets brought to the Samuel Goldwyn Studios, ... More Less

In the scene in which the acrobatics of the French group The Charlivels is shown, slow motion photography is used. HR news items add the following information about the production: In Sep 1949, Ken Englund was announced as the film's scriptwriter and Alex Gottlieb as producer. Englund's contribution to the final film, if any, has not been determined. In Apr 1950, production was delayed for five months while a leading man was secured. Gottlieb was replaced as producer by Danny Dare in May, but in mid-Aug 1950, Dare left the production because of prior commitments. RKO head Howard Hughes then took over as producer. RKO borrowed Janet Leigh and Ann Miller from M-G-M. Dancers Marge and Gower Champion, who were also borrowed from M-G-M, coached Leigh during the delay. Virginia Carroll and Manny Harmon were announced as cast members, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Shirley Whitney, who plays a "girl" in the film, originally was hired as Janet Leigh's stand-in. Exterior street scenes were shot on Paramount's back lot. In mid-Jan 1951, production moved from RKO's Gower Street studios to the RKO-Pathé Studios in Culver City, CA.
       Two Tickets to Broadway marked the screen debut of actress Vera Miles. It also marked the first time that Miles and Leigh, who played sisters in Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film Psycho (See Entry), appeared together. The film received an Academy Award nomination for Best Sound Recording. Modern sources note that the picture lost $1,150,000 at the box office. Modern sources also state that during production, Hughes ordered the sets brought to the Samuel Goldwyn Studios, where Hughes spent most of his time, and had them assembled for his approval. The sets then were broken down and reassembled on the RKO lot a few miles away. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
20 Oct 1951.
---
Daily Variety
10 Oct 51
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 Oct 51
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 49
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Apr 50
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 May 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
31 May 50
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 50
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 50
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Oct 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 50
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Nov 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 50
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Dec 50
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jan 51
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jan 51
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Feb 51
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Oct 51
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Oct 51
p. 2.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
20 Oct 51
pp. 1066-67.
New York Times
22 Nov 51
p. 47.
Variety
10 Oct 51
p. 6.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Joy Lansing
Jimmy Dundee
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus score
Vocal arr
Vocal arr for Tony Martin's numbers
DANCE
Mus numbers created and dir by
Asst dance dir
Asst dance dir
Dance coach for Janet Leigh
Dance coach for Janet Leigh
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"Are You a Beautiful Dream?" "The Closer You Are," "Baby, You'll Never Be Sorry," "The Worry Bird," "Big Chief Hole-in-the-Ground," "Pelican Falls" and "It Began in Yucatan," words and music by Jule Styne and Leo Robin
"Manhattan," words and music by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart
"There's No Tomorrow," words and music by Al Hoffman, Leo Corday and Leon Carr
+
SONGS
"Are You a Beautiful Dream?" "The Closer You Are," "Baby, You'll Never Be Sorry," "The Worry Bird," "Big Chief Hole-in-the-Ground," "Pelican Falls" and "It Began in Yucatan," words and music by Jule Styne and Leo Robin
"Manhattan," words and music by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart
"There's No Tomorrow," words and music by Al Hoffman, Leo Corday and Leon Carr
Prologue to Il pagliacci , libretto and music by Ruggiero Leoncavallo, added English libretto by James V. Kern and Sid Silvers
"Let's Make Comparisons," words and music by Sammy Cahn and Bob Crosby.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
November 1951
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 1 Nov 1951; New York opening: 21 Nov 1951
Production Date:
began 4 Nov 1950
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 November 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1327
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
106
Length(in feet):
9,572
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
14942
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On a New York-bound bus, three young entertainers, S. F. "Foxy" Rogers, Joyce Campbell and Hannah Holbrook, curse their agent, Lew Conway, for booking them into a showboat revue in Vermont, which flopped after three days. Broke and hungry, the women eagerly greet Broadway hopeful Nancy Peterson, who boards the bus in Pelican Falls after a rousing sendoff, and share her box lunch. At the New York bus terminal, Nancy parts ways with the women, just as a discouraged singer, Dan Carter, arrives to catch a bus bound for home. Dan's fast-talking agent, Lew, rushes in to stop him from boarding by lying that the Vermont revue is a hit and needs a new leading man. As Dan is leaving the station with Lew, Nancy, who has discovered that her suitcase is missing, spots what she mistakenly believes is her luggage in Dan's hands and calls for the police. Nancy soon is reunited with her suitcase and apologizes, but when Dan graciously hails Nancy a taxi, the two suitcases are inadvertently switched. Later, armed with her bag, Dan tracks Nancy to a show business boardinghouse and learns that she has much in common with him. Dan then invites Nancy for a walk in Central Park and counsels her not to trust sophisticated, city-bred men. At Lew's place, meanwhile, Hannah, his long-suffering girl friend, berates Lew for his conniving ways, but becomes excited when he gets an idea to persuade Leo and Harry, owners of a Broadway delicatessen, to invest in a television act featuring Dan and the women. To that end, Lew arranges for actor Willard Glendon to impersonate Dennis McGiven, the ... +


On a New York-bound bus, three young entertainers, S. F. "Foxy" Rogers, Joyce Campbell and Hannah Holbrook, curse their agent, Lew Conway, for booking them into a showboat revue in Vermont, which flopped after three days. Broke and hungry, the women eagerly greet Broadway hopeful Nancy Peterson, who boards the bus in Pelican Falls after a rousing sendoff, and share her box lunch. At the New York bus terminal, Nancy parts ways with the women, just as a discouraged singer, Dan Carter, arrives to catch a bus bound for home. Dan's fast-talking agent, Lew, rushes in to stop him from boarding by lying that the Vermont revue is a hit and needs a new leading man. As Dan is leaving the station with Lew, Nancy, who has discovered that her suitcase is missing, spots what she mistakenly believes is her luggage in Dan's hands and calls for the police. Nancy soon is reunited with her suitcase and apologizes, but when Dan graciously hails Nancy a taxi, the two suitcases are inadvertently switched. Later, armed with her bag, Dan tracks Nancy to a show business boardinghouse and learns that she has much in common with him. Dan then invites Nancy for a walk in Central Park and counsels her not to trust sophisticated, city-bred men. At Lew's place, meanwhile, Hannah, his long-suffering girl friend, berates Lew for his conniving ways, but becomes excited when he gets an idea to persuade Leo and Harry, owners of a Broadway delicatessen, to invest in a television act featuring Dan and the women. To that end, Lew arranges for actor Willard Glendon to impersonate Dennis McGiven, the producer of singer Bob Crosby's television show, and approach Dan in the deli. Glendon states that he admires Dan's voice and suggests that if he works up an act with some girls, they will be all but guaranteed a spot on Crosby's show. Leo and Harry witness Glendon's offer, and Dan and Lew convince them to sponsor the act. Nancy, who has joined the group, relays the good news to her parents in Pelican Falls, and soon the local newspaper is trumpeting her imminent television debut. Over the next few weeks, the group hones their act and Dan and Nancy fall in love. Lew, meanwhile, tries to see McGiven repeatedly, but is turned away. Just as Dan and the others begin to wonder if they will get their audition, Lew has Glendon show up at rehearsal posing as McGiven to announce that he has arranged for them to perform the act at a benefit, which Crosby is to attend. Although the benefit goes well, Glendon informs the group that Crosby is not interested in hiring them because Dan is too good a singer. The next day, an outraged Nancy storms onto Crosby's television studio set and denounces the singer. When a confused Crosby introduces Nancy to the real McGiven, however, Nancy runs off in tears. Humiliated and broken, Nancy then packs and heads for the bus station. At the same time, Dan shows up at the television studio to confront Crosby and learns that McGiven has been trying to contact him for months and would like him to appear on the show. Having finally gained admittance to the studio, Lew overhears Crosby say that he cannot use Dan on that night's show because he has already filled with spot with a French acrobatic team. Posing as a makeup artist, Lew locks the Frenchmen in a room, forcing Crosby to book Dan. With only an hour until air time, Lew discovers that Nancy is on a bus bound for home and jumps on board to retrieve her. Nancy refuses to believe Lew at first, but when the bus passes by a store selling televisions and she sees Dan singing opera on Crosby's show, she and Lew hop off and rush to the studio. Nancy arrives just in time to join Dan, Hannah, Foxy and Joyce on stage, and after their triumphant debut, she and Dan enjoy a long kiss. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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