April in Paris (1953)

101 or 104 mins | Musical, Romantic comedy | 3 January 1953

Director:

David Butler

Producer:

William Jacobs

Cinematographer:

Wilfrid M. Cline

Editor:

Irene Morra

Production Designer:

Leo Kuter

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

Throughout the film, Claude Dauphin, as "Philippe Fouquet," addresses the audience directly with comments about the action. According to an Oct 1951 HR news item, Robert Arthur was originally assigned to direct April in Paris. A Warner Bros. production staff and cast list dated 7 Mar 1951 lists Percy Warum as "Sherman"; however, the part was played by Paul Harvey in the final film. Although their appearance in the film has not been confirmed, a May 1952 HR news item added George Dee and Nina Borget to the cast. The film's title song, "April in Paris," was actually written in 1932 for the Broadway musical comedy, Walk a Little Faster. ...

More Less

Throughout the film, Claude Dauphin, as "Philippe Fouquet," addresses the audience directly with comments about the action. According to an Oct 1951 HR news item, Robert Arthur was originally assigned to direct April in Paris. A Warner Bros. production staff and cast list dated 7 Mar 1951 lists Percy Warum as "Sherman"; however, the part was played by Paul Harvey in the final film. Although their appearance in the film has not been confirmed, a May 1952 HR news item added George Dee and Nina Borget to the cast. The film's title song, "April in Paris," was actually written in 1932 for the Broadway musical comedy, Walk a Little Faster.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
15 Nov 1952
---
Daily Variety
13 Nov 1952
p. 3
Film Daily
21 Nov 1952
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 1951
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
27 May 1952
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
14 Mar 1952
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 1952
p. 15
Hollywood Reporter
13 Nov 1952
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
15 Nov 1952
p. 1605
New York Times
25 Dec 1952
p. 34
Variety
19 Nov 1952
p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Lee White
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Stills
Gaffer
Photog tech
Photog asst
ART DIRECTORS
Leo K. Kuter
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Lyle B. Reifsnider
Set dec
Prop master
Asst props
COSTUMES
Set ward
Set ward
MUSIC
Mus dir
Vocal arr
DANCE
Mus numbers staged and dir by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Alma D. Young
Scr supv
Best boy
William Jones
Asst grip
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"April in Paris," music by Vernon Duke, lyrics by E. Y. Harburg; "It Must Be Good," "Life Is Such a Pleasure," "Give Me Your Lips," "I'm Gonna Ring the Bell Tonight," "The Difference," "I Know a Place," "That's What Makes Paris Paree," "Who Needs It?" and "I Ask You," music by Vernon Duke, lyrics by Sammy Cahn.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
3 January 1953
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 24 Dec 1952
Production Date:
began mid Mar 1952
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
3 December 1952
LP2117
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
101 or 104
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15876
SYNOPSIS

In Washington, D.C., S. Winthrop "Sam" Putnam, the officious Assistant Secretary to the Assistant to the Undersecretary of State, is embarrassed to discover that a letter inviting Ethel Barrymore to represent the American theater at the International Festival of the Arts in Paris was mistakenly sent to Ethel "Dynamite" Jackson, a Broadway chorus girl. Hoping to rectify the situation, Sam flies to New York to explain the mix-up to Ethel. Later, however, when he is lauded for his ingenious decision to represent the common man at the prestigious event, he re-invites her, enticing her with descriptions of a romantic Paris in springtime. On the French luxury liner to Paris, Ethel is surrounded by the other, distinguished, middle-aged, male festival representatives, who are all unabashedly haughty and determined that Ethel will not disgrace the U.S. with her natural ebullience. Also on the ship is Philippe Fouquet, a French entertainer and nightclub owner famous for his womanizing, who must work as a waiter for his return passage to France, as his money has been indefinitely frozen for back taxes in the U.S. On the last night of the cruise, Philippe rescues Ethel from lessons in using correct dining etiquette and French, and takes her to the shipboard ball, expecting that Sam, who is secretly smitten with her, will soon leave the stuffy group to join her. However, when ordered by his employer to return to the kitchen, the irrepressible Philippe convinces Ethel to go with him and soon has the French kitchen staff honorbound to show Ethel a good time. A joyous party commences, but when the delegation learns that Ethel is dancing in the kitchen, Sam is sent to inform ...

More Less

In Washington, D.C., S. Winthrop "Sam" Putnam, the officious Assistant Secretary to the Assistant to the Undersecretary of State, is embarrassed to discover that a letter inviting Ethel Barrymore to represent the American theater at the International Festival of the Arts in Paris was mistakenly sent to Ethel "Dynamite" Jackson, a Broadway chorus girl. Hoping to rectify the situation, Sam flies to New York to explain the mix-up to Ethel. Later, however, when he is lauded for his ingenious decision to represent the common man at the prestigious event, he re-invites her, enticing her with descriptions of a romantic Paris in springtime. On the French luxury liner to Paris, Ethel is surrounded by the other, distinguished, middle-aged, male festival representatives, who are all unabashedly haughty and determined that Ethel will not disgrace the U.S. with her natural ebullience. Also on the ship is Philippe Fouquet, a French entertainer and nightclub owner famous for his womanizing, who must work as a waiter for his return passage to France, as his money has been indefinitely frozen for back taxes in the U.S. On the last night of the cruise, Philippe rescues Ethel from lessons in using correct dining etiquette and French, and takes her to the shipboard ball, expecting that Sam, who is secretly smitten with her, will soon leave the stuffy group to join her. However, when ordered by his employer to return to the kitchen, the irrepressible Philippe convinces Ethel to go with him and soon has the French kitchen staff honorbound to show Ethel a good time. A joyous party commences, but when the delegation learns that Ethel is dancing in the kitchen, Sam is sent to inform her that she will be returned to the U.S. However, in the kitchen, Sam feels obliged to drink toasts to the U.S., France, and then every other country, so that by the time he meets up with Ethel, he has joined the dancing. At the end of the evening, Ethel and Sam know they are in love, but as Sam's engagement to his boss's daughter, Marcia Sherman, has already been announced in the Congressional Record , there seems to be no future for them. In spite of the obstacles, they decide to be secretly married by the ship captain, and Philippe makes the arrangements for them. Soon after, however, Philippe discovers that the "captain" was really François, a busboy who was stealing liquor from the captain's room when Philippe unwittingly interrupted him. Although Philippe wants to tell Ethel and Sam that their marriage is phony, François convinces him that, to avoid arrest, they must wait until the ship docks. The Frenchmen then booby-trap the couple's bedrooms to delay their marital bliss. After suffering from collapsing beds, self-opening doors and lights that turn on automatically, Sam and Ethel's attempts at a honeymoon are finally curtailed when his boss, Secretary Sherman, shows up to reprimand Sam for joining the kitchen party, and Ethel spends the rest of the night alone in the bathtub. After arriving in Paris, Sam discovers that Marcia has flown in to keep an eye on him. Though he has convinced the delegation to allow Ethel to remain, Sam decides, for the sake of the festival, to delay announcing their marriage, but his hopes for a smooth opening are shattered when, during a speech about peace and harmony, Ethel and Marcia begin slapping each other. Ethel is expelled from the festival hall, and walks off her frustration in the cold and wind of springtime Paris. When she encounters Philippe, he informs her that her marriage is not legitimate. The romantic Philippe realizes how much she loves Sam, and decides to help her get him back. Meanwhile, to avoid being alone with Marcia and her jealousy-inspired ardor, Sam agrees to attend a nightclub with the Shermans, unaware that it belongs to Philippe and that Ethel is the featured performer. Sam becomes jealous and wants to go backstage when he sees Ethel kiss Philippe at the end of their act, but Marcia threatens him with job dismissal if he does. Sam leaves after accusing her of wanting him for his White House potential, and Sherman, who is aware of Marcia's faults, backs him up. In her dressing room, Ethel rebuffs Sam and pretends to be having an affair with Philippe. Knowing that Sam is following her, Ethel follows Philippe to his apartment, where Sam is ready to fight Philippe. To Ethel and Sam's surprise, Philippe's wife Mimi shows up and they learn that Philippe's carefree Parisian demeanor is just a professional act, as he is secretly and happily married, with five children. Now Sam stubbornly accuses Ethel of consorting with a married man, but the Fouquets gently send the sparring lovebirds away. Out on the streets, Ethel and Sam continue their quarreling until daybreak, when, in sight of the Eiffel Tower, they make up.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Down Three Dark Streets

The film's working title was Case File: FBI . The Gordons was a joint name under which husband and wife Gordon and Mildred Gordon wrote the novel on ... >>

Psycho

Actor Vaughn Taylor's surname is misspelled "Tayler" in the onscreen credits. Several Jun and Jul 1959 HR news items erroneously refer to the film as Psyche. ... >>

Top Gun

The following written prologue appears before the title: “On March 3, 1969 the United States Navy established an elite school for the top one percent of its pilots. Its ... >>

Chance at Heaven

The ending of the film is ambiguous concerning the result of Glory's pregnancy. Although her mother states that the doctor was wrong in his diagnosis, the script strongly ... >>

Pinocchio

According to material contained in the production file for this film at the AMPAS Library, the original Carlo Collodi story was written in installments for an Italian weekly magazine. ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.