Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952)

89-90 or 93 mins | Musical comedy | November 1952

Full page view
HISTORY

The film's opening title card reads, "Twentieth Century-Fox presents Damon Runyon's Bloodhounds of Broadway ." Runyon's story was later included in his short story collection entitled Guys and Dolls (New York, 1931). According to an Apr 1951 LAEx news item, Victor Mature and Jean Peters were set to co-star with Mitzi Gaynor in the film. In Oct 1951, Martha Raye and Zero Mostel were announced by HR as cast members. A 9 Feb 1952 LAT item reported that producer George Jessel had "made a pitch to get" Judy Garland to star opposite Scott Brady. Frank Fontaine had been set for a role but withdrew "following a screenplay re-write," according to an Apr 1952 HR item. Also in Apr 1952, HR noted that Keenan Wynn was originally cast as "Poorly," but due to a previous commitment at his home studio, M-G-M, was replaced by Wally Vernon. The following actors were included in the cast by HR news items, although their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed: Teddy Hart, Beverly Baker, Darlene Coureil, Mazine Doviat, Rita Leonard, Betty Jane Petit, Harry Seymour, Ralph Proctor Gamble of the Gamble Brothers vaudeville team, and Walter Vernon, the father of Wally Vernon.
       According to a Nov 1952 Var article, Twentieth Century-Fox was sued by Cy Feuer and Ernest H. Martin, the producers of the Broadway musical Guys and Dolls , which was also based on works by Damon Runyon. Feuer and Martin claimed that advertisements for Bloodhounds of Broadway , stating "The Screen's Big Broadway Musical--with all the ... More Less

The film's opening title card reads, "Twentieth Century-Fox presents Damon Runyon's Bloodhounds of Broadway ." Runyon's story was later included in his short story collection entitled Guys and Dolls (New York, 1931). According to an Apr 1951 LAEx news item, Victor Mature and Jean Peters were set to co-star with Mitzi Gaynor in the film. In Oct 1951, Martha Raye and Zero Mostel were announced by HR as cast members. A 9 Feb 1952 LAT item reported that producer George Jessel had "made a pitch to get" Judy Garland to star opposite Scott Brady. Frank Fontaine had been set for a role but withdrew "following a screenplay re-write," according to an Apr 1952 HR item. Also in Apr 1952, HR noted that Keenan Wynn was originally cast as "Poorly," but due to a previous commitment at his home studio, M-G-M, was replaced by Wally Vernon. The following actors were included in the cast by HR news items, although their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed: Teddy Hart, Beverly Baker, Darlene Coureil, Mazine Doviat, Rita Leonard, Betty Jane Petit, Harry Seymour, Ralph Proctor Gamble of the Gamble Brothers vaudeville team, and Walter Vernon, the father of Wally Vernon.
       According to a Nov 1952 Var article, Twentieth Century-Fox was sued by Cy Feuer and Ernest H. Martin, the producers of the Broadway musical Guys and Dolls , which was also based on works by Damon Runyon. Feuer and Martin claimed that advertisements for Bloodhounds of Broadway , stating "The Screen's Big Broadway Musical--with all the fabulous Damon Runyon Guys and Dolls," were deliberately misleading and attempted to "captitalize on the great success of the Broadway musical." The disposition of the suit has not been determined. In 1989, "The Bloodhounds of Broadway," along with several other Runyon short stories, was the basis for a Columbia TriStar release of the same name, which was directed by Howard Brookner and starred Matt Dillon, Madonna and Jennifer Grey. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
1 Nov 1952.
---
Daily Variety
27 Oct 52
p. 3.
Film Daily
29 Oct 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Mar 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 52
p. 39.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Apr 52
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 52
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 52
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
20 May 52
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 52
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
26 May 52
p. 4, 8
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Oct 52
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Nov 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Nov 52
p. 1.
Los Angeles Examiner
12 Apr 1951.
---
Los Angeles Times
9 Feb 1952.
---
Motion Picture Daily
30 Oct 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Nov 52
p. 1589.
New York Times
15 Nov 52
p. 15.
Variety
29 Oct 52
p. 6.
Variety
26 Nov 1952.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Musical settings
COSTUMES
Ward dir
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus dir
Vocal dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Mus numbers staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Dial dir
Dog trainer
Crew member
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Bloodhounds of Broadway" by Damon Runyon in Collier's (16 May 1931).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Bye Low," music and lyrics by Eliot Daniel
"Jack O'Diamonds," music and lyrics by Ben Oakland and Paul Webster
"Broadway Rhythm" and "I've Got a Feelin' You're Foolin'," music by Nacio Herb Brown, lyrics by Arthur Freed
+
SONGS
"Bye Low," music and lyrics by Eliot Daniel
"Jack O'Diamonds," music and lyrics by Ben Oakland and Paul Webster
"Broadway Rhythm" and "I've Got a Feelin' You're Foolin'," music by Nacio Herb Brown, lyrics by Arthur Freed
"You Send Me" and "Eighty Miles Outside of Atlanta," music and lyrics by Jimmy McHugh and Harold Adamson
"In the Sweet Bye and Bye," music by Harry von Tilzer, lyrics by Harold Adamson
"Cindy," traditional, additional lyrics by Eliot Daniel
"I Wish I Knew," music by Harry Warren and Mack Gordon.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Damon Runyon's Bloodhounds of Broadway
Release Date:
November 1952
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 14 November 1952
Los Angeles opening: 26 November 1952
Production Date:
28 April--late May 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
11 November 1952
Copyright Number:
LP2328
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
89-90 or 93
Length(in feet):
8,338
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15937
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Well-known Broadway bookie Robert "Numbers" Foster receives a tip that he and his men, among them, hypochondriac Harry "Poorly" Sammis, are about to be subpoenaed by the State Crime Investigation Committee. Numbers arranges for his girl friend, singer Yvonne Dugan, to be coached in helpful testimony by dancer Curtaintime Charlie, then heads for Florida with his mugs. Yvonne appears before the committee and testifies that Numbers is a gambler, not a bookie, and the investigation is closed. Numbers then sends the rest of the men back to New York via plane while he and Poorly drive in order "to keep the heat off." During the drive, Numbers sleeps while Poorly gets lost, and they end up at a rural Georgia farm. There, hillbilly Emly Ann Stackerlee is conducting a funeral for her grandpap, and the usually edgy Numbers is soothed by Emly Ann's lovely singing. Emly Ann is delighted by her guests, although her moonshiner fiancé, Crockett Pace, fears that they are "revenuers," and shoots at Emly Ann's shack while she serves them dinner. With Emly Ann and her bloodhounds, Nip and Tuck, in tow, Numbers and Poorly beat a hasty retreat. Worried about Emly Ann's safety, Numbers decides to take her to New York, where she can receive a good education and find a husband "with shoes." Numbers drops the enthralled Emly Ann off at the apartment of Poorly's sister Tessie, then goes to his headquarters, a nightclub run by Dave the Dude. There, Numbers is greeted by Yvonne and his chums, but their reunion is interrupted by the arrival of Inspector McNamara, Numbers' childhood friend, who is now in charge of ... +


Well-known Broadway bookie Robert "Numbers" Foster receives a tip that he and his men, among them, hypochondriac Harry "Poorly" Sammis, are about to be subpoenaed by the State Crime Investigation Committee. Numbers arranges for his girl friend, singer Yvonne Dugan, to be coached in helpful testimony by dancer Curtaintime Charlie, then heads for Florida with his mugs. Yvonne appears before the committee and testifies that Numbers is a gambler, not a bookie, and the investigation is closed. Numbers then sends the rest of the men back to New York via plane while he and Poorly drive in order "to keep the heat off." During the drive, Numbers sleeps while Poorly gets lost, and they end up at a rural Georgia farm. There, hillbilly Emly Ann Stackerlee is conducting a funeral for her grandpap, and the usually edgy Numbers is soothed by Emly Ann's lovely singing. Emly Ann is delighted by her guests, although her moonshiner fiancé, Crockett Pace, fears that they are "revenuers," and shoots at Emly Ann's shack while she serves them dinner. With Emly Ann and her bloodhounds, Nip and Tuck, in tow, Numbers and Poorly beat a hasty retreat. Worried about Emly Ann's safety, Numbers decides to take her to New York, where she can receive a good education and find a husband "with shoes." Numbers drops the enthralled Emly Ann off at the apartment of Poorly's sister Tessie, then goes to his headquarters, a nightclub run by Dave the Dude. There, Numbers is greeted by Yvonne and his chums, but their reunion is interrupted by the arrival of Inspector McNamara, Numbers' childhood friend, who is now in charge of a new crime committee. McNamara, who believes that at heart, Numbers is a good guy, warns his friend that he will be looking for new witnesses. Worried, Numbers orders his men to be extremely careful with their new set-up. Soon after, Tessie brings a transformed Emly Ann to the club, and Numbers is flabbergasted that the pig-tailed hillbilly he thought was a "kid" is actually a beautiful woman. Jealous, Yvonne points out that McNamara would love to learn that Numbers has transported a twenty-year-old minor across state lines. Determined to install her in a "legit" job, Numbers arranges for Emly Ann to rehearse with Curtaintime Charlie, with the intent of getting her a job performing at the nightclub. Emly Ann works hard at her rehearsals, while Numbers struggles with his growing attraction to her. Deducing that Numbers is in love, Poorly advises him to marry Yvonne, who he assumes is the object of Numbers' affection. When Numbers confesses that he does not love Yvonne, Poorly reminds him that her perjured testimony is the only reason that they were not jailed. Yvonne, who is still jealous of Emly Ann, warns Numbers that she will be very unhappy if Emly Ann gets a job at Dave's nightclub, where she is the headliner, and Numbers informs Emly Ann that there will be no audition. Emly Ann's brave acceptance of his dictate prompts Numbers to concoct another scheme, and he holds the audition as planned, although instead of Dave, he invites numerous Hollywood and Broadway casting directors. Emly Ann is a sensation and receives many offers, although she is upset when Numbers advises her to go to Hollywood, far away from him. Emly Ann reveals that she has fallen in love with Numbers, and was going to ask him to marry her if she had not learned from Tessie that he and Yvonne were "bespoken." Numbers assures Emly Ann that he returns her feelings, and when Yvonne learns of the situation, she goes to McNamara to offer revised testimony about Numbers' business dealings. Although Emly Ann wants Numbers to go straight and testify about the big syndicate for which he works, Numbers refuses, as he would have to pay his substantial back taxes. Numbers and Poorly depart in a hurry, leaving Emly Ann with Nip and Tuck, who have grown fond of Poorly, to lament their absence. McNamara visits Emly Ann and promises that that if Numbers testifies before Yvonne does, he will have to serve only one year in prison. Determined to find her beloved, whom she believes is in serious danger, Emly Ann uses the bloodhounds to track Poorly, and locates him and Numbers on a pier waiting for a boat to Cuba. Numbers mistakenly assumes that Emly Ann has led the police to him, but even though she calms his misapprehensions, he refuses to testify. Emly Ann cries as Numbers and Poorly leave, and her tears are about to convince Numbers to return to the dock when their motorboat is hit by a tug. The bookies survive the accident, however, and testify before the committee, to which Numbers also pays his back taxes. A year later, after their release from prison, Numbers is a cashier at Dave's nightclub, and Poorly and the other mugs work as waiters. Emly Ann is now the star attraction, and she gleefully goes to the kitchen to kiss Numbers after performing. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.