Everything I Have Is Yours (1952)

91-92 mins | 31 October 1952

Director:

Robert Z. Leonard

Writer:

George Wells

Producer:

George Wells

Cinematographer:

William V. Skall

Editor:

Adrienne Fazan

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Randall Duell

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

According to HR news items, Red Skelton was to have starred in the film. Other HR news items mentioned that producer-director George Sidney replaced director Robert Z. Leonard for five days when Leonard was ill. Everything I Have Is Yours marked the first starring film role for the then-married dance team of Marge and Gower Champion, and George Wells’ first producing assignment for ... More Less

According to HR news items, Red Skelton was to have starred in the film. Other HR news items mentioned that producer-director George Sidney replaced director Robert Z. Leonard for five days when Leonard was ill. Everything I Have Is Yours marked the first starring film role for the then-married dance team of Marge and Gower Champion, and George Wells’ first producing assignment for M-G-M. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
4 Oct 1952.
---
Daily Variety
24 Sep 1952
p. 3.
Film Daily
29 Sep 1952
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 1951
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 1951
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Feb 1952
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Mar 1952
p. 11, 14.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Mar 1952
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Sep 1952
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
1 Nov 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 Sep 1952
p. 1541.
New York Times
29 Oct 1952
p. 35.
New York Times
30 Oct 1952
p. 40.
Newsweek
3 Nov 1952.
---
Time
3 Nov 1952.
---
Variety
24 Sep 1952
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Fill-In dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Women's cost des
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Mont seq
DANCE
Mus numbers staged by
Mus numbers staged by
MAKEUP
Hair styles by
Makeup created by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
Col consultant
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Serenade for a New Baby" by Johnny Green
"Casablanca" by Richard Priborsky.
SONGS
"Derry Down Dilly," music and lyrics by Johnny Green and Johnny Mercer
"Like Monday Follows Sunday," music and lyrics by Johnny Green, Clifford Grey, Rex Newman and Douglas Furber
"Seventeen Thousand Telephone Poles," music and lyrics by Saul Chaplin
+
SONGS
"Derry Down Dilly," music and lyrics by Johnny Green and Johnny Mercer
"Like Monday Follows Sunday," music and lyrics by Johnny Green, Clifford Grey, Rex Newman and Douglas Furber
"Seventeen Thousand Telephone Poles," music and lyrics by Saul Chaplin
"My Heart Skips a Beat," music and lyrics by Walter Donaldson, Bob Wright and Chet Forrest
"General Hiram Johnson Jefferson Brown," music and lyrics by Walter Donaldson and Gus Kahn
"Everything I Have Is Yours," music and lyrics by Burton Lane and Harold Adamson.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
31 October 1952
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 29 October 1952
Production Date:
mid February--mid March 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 September 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1955
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
91-92
Length(in feet):
8,247
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15983
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Just before married dancers Pamela and Chuck Hubbard make their Broadway debut in Alec Tackabury’s new show, Pam is nervous, exhausted and unable to eat. Chuck, who frequently develops empathetic symptoms whenever Pam is ill, thinks she is just anxious and to show his love gives her a beautiful charm bracelet depicting them dancing. The musical is a smash hit, but just after the curtains close, Pam collapses. A doctor reveals what even Pam had not suspected, that she is going to have a baby. Although the doctor says that Pam could remain with the show for a while, Pam decides to quit that night. Alec is disappointed that his newly discovered team will be breaking up, but is very understanding and decides that understudy Sybil Meriden must take Pam’s place. Although a nervous wreck before the show, Sybil is also a hit with audiences and soon becomes Chuck’s permanent partner. As soon as baby Pamela is born, Chuck decides that they should buy a house in Connecticut, near Alec, and tells Pam that they have enough money for her to stay at home with the baby. Although Pam is reluctant to leave show business, she agrees. By the time that little Pamela is three and a half, Sybil and Chuck have been in several successful shows, while Pam has stayed at home. Because they have servants, Pam has little to do but work at her hobbies and play with Pamela. One day, Chuck comes home with Sybil, their friend Monty Dunstan, columnist Ed Holly and several others for an impromptu weekend visit. Pam, who has been ... +


Just before married dancers Pamela and Chuck Hubbard make their Broadway debut in Alec Tackabury’s new show, Pam is nervous, exhausted and unable to eat. Chuck, who frequently develops empathetic symptoms whenever Pam is ill, thinks she is just anxious and to show his love gives her a beautiful charm bracelet depicting them dancing. The musical is a smash hit, but just after the curtains close, Pam collapses. A doctor reveals what even Pam had not suspected, that she is going to have a baby. Although the doctor says that Pam could remain with the show for a while, Pam decides to quit that night. Alec is disappointed that his newly discovered team will be breaking up, but is very understanding and decides that understudy Sybil Meriden must take Pam’s place. Although a nervous wreck before the show, Sybil is also a hit with audiences and soon becomes Chuck’s permanent partner. As soon as baby Pamela is born, Chuck decides that they should buy a house in Connecticut, near Alec, and tells Pam that they have enough money for her to stay at home with the baby. Although Pam is reluctant to leave show business, she agrees. By the time that little Pamela is three and a half, Sybil and Chuck have been in several successful shows, while Pam has stayed at home. Because they have servants, Pam has little to do but work at her hobbies and play with Pamela. One day, Chuck comes home with Sybil, their friend Monty Dunstan, columnist Ed Holly and several others for an impromptu weekend visit. Pam, who has been frustrated about being away from show business and grown jealous of Sybil, is delighted to be asked to sing and dance at a barbecue that night. Chuck is surprised to learn that Pam has secretly been practicing and becomes jealous when she says that Alec has been talking about a new show for the two of them. Before Chuck goes back to New York, he and Pam finally make up, but he dismisses her suggestion that they do Alec’s show. After he leaves, Pam tells Alec that they will have to find a new leading man and decides to do the show herself. Soon Holly announces on a radio broadcast that although Pam and Chuck are working in adjacent studios, they are filing for divorce. After meeting with their lawyer, Phil Neisner, Pam and Chuck work out a property settlement and joint custody agreement. Chuck still thinks that little Pamela should not be around show business but soon comes to realize that she enjoys backstage life. When Pam’s show goes to Boston for out-of-town tryouts, Chuck barely misses seeing them off on the train and has trouble reaching her hotel. Sybil, who is jealous of Pam, suggests to Chuck that she is probably out celebrating, then, when Pam calls Chuck, she is hurt when she hears Sybil’s voice in the background. After getting off the phone, Pam is counseled by Alec to reconsider the divorce, but admits that Chuck’s jealousy of him was not unfounded. After he leaves, Pam looks at the charm bracelet and starts to cry, but is comforted by little Pamela. A few days later, in Chuck’s dressing room, Sybil makes a play for him but is completely rejected. After she leaves, Alec comes in and says that Pam does not know he is in New York but his play is in trouble and he has spoken with Chuck’s producer about having Chuck leave the current show to begin rehearsing with Pam. When Chuck refuses the offer, Alec decides to evoke sympathy pangs in Chuck by saying that Pam has back pains and has been seeing spots. Chuck gets so agitated after hearing of Pam’s supposed conditions that he comes down with additional symptoms and soon decides to join her in Boston. When he arrives at her hotel, Pam at first does not know what he is talking about when he tries to compare the size of the spots they both see, but soon realizes what Alec has done and plays along. When little Pamela sees her father, she is ecstatic, especially when Chuck says that he is going to stay and take care of Pam. Just then, the desk clerk calls, inquiring about where to send Chuck’s bags. Chuck says emphatically, “here, of course,” and Pam adds “and the trunk, too.” Finally reconciled, the couple happily dances around the room. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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