Jack and the Beanstalk (1952)

78 mins | Children's works, Musical comedy | 12 April 1952

Director:

Jean Yarbrough

Writer:

Nat Curtis

Producer:

Alex Gottlieb

Cinematographer:

George Robinson

Editor:

Otho Lovering

Production Designer:

McClure Capps

Production Company:

Exclusive Productions, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The film's onscreen title card reads: "Abbott and Costello in Jack and the Beanstalk ." In the opening credits, the character, "Patrick the Harp," is listed as a cast member. In the film, the character is represented by an elaborate carving of a face on top of the musical instrument. Arthur Shields provided the harp's voice. The film, which was produced by Lou Costello's company, was shot entirely at the Hal Roach Studios in Culver City, CA. The baby-sitting scene of the picture, which was filmed in sepia tone, was written by Lou Costello's brother Pat, who, according to Warner Bros. production notes, got the idea while reading to his four-year-old daughter.
       Brief animation sequences appear in the fantasy portion of the film, which was Abbott and Costello's first color production. The world premiere was held in Costello's home town, Patterson, NJ. Although the opening credits claim to "introduce" Shaye Cogan and James Alexander, Jack and the Beanstalk did not mark Cogan's film debut. She first appeared in the 1951 Universal-International production Comin' Round the Mountain , which also starred Abbott and Costello (See Entry). Modern sources include Hank Mann in the ... More Less

The film's onscreen title card reads: "Abbott and Costello in Jack and the Beanstalk ." In the opening credits, the character, "Patrick the Harp," is listed as a cast member. In the film, the character is represented by an elaborate carving of a face on top of the musical instrument. Arthur Shields provided the harp's voice. The film, which was produced by Lou Costello's company, was shot entirely at the Hal Roach Studios in Culver City, CA. The baby-sitting scene of the picture, which was filmed in sepia tone, was written by Lou Costello's brother Pat, who, according to Warner Bros. production notes, got the idea while reading to his four-year-old daughter.
       Brief animation sequences appear in the fantasy portion of the film, which was Abbott and Costello's first color production. The world premiere was held in Costello's home town, Patterson, NJ. Although the opening credits claim to "introduce" Shaye Cogan and James Alexander, Jack and the Beanstalk did not mark Cogan's film debut. She first appeared in the 1951 Universal-International production Comin' Round the Mountain , which also starred Abbott and Costello (See Entry). Modern sources include Hank Mann in the cast. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
12 Apr 1952.
---
Daily Variety
3 Apr 52
p. 3.
Film Daily
9 Apr 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
28 May 51
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 51
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jul 51
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jul 51
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Apr 52
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Apr 52
p. 1306.
New York Times
6 Apr 1952.
---
New York Times
8 Apr 52
p. 35.
Variety
9 Apr 52
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
From a story by
Addl comedy by
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward supv
MUSIC
Mus score comp and cond
Choral dir
Mus supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to exec prod
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
Col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"Jack and the Beanstalk," "I Fear Nothing," "Darlene," "Dreamer's Cloth" and "He Never Looked Better in His Life," music by Lester Lee, lyrics by Bob Russell.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Abbott and Costello in Jack and the Beanstalk
Release Date:
12 April 1952
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Patterson, NJ: 4 April 1952
New York opening: 7 April 1952
Production Date:
9 July--4 August 1951 at Hal Roach Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Exclusive Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
7 April 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1626
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
col with b&w seq
Color
SuperCinecolor and Sepia Tone
Duration(in mins):
78
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15361
SYNOPSIS

Lovebirds Eloise Larkin and Arthur Royal, who are performing in an amateur theatrical production, have a dress rehearsal to attend, but Eloise must first find a baby-sitter for her siblings, a baby sister and a precocious eight-year-old brother, Donald. As no baby-sitter will watch the mischievous Donald more than once, Eloise calls Polly, a very tall person who runs an employment agency. Before going on a date with her boyfriend, the colossal Sgt. Riley, Polly sends Jack and his "agent," Mr. Dinkel, to the Larkin house. When Jack and Dinkel arrive, Donald is ready to terrorize, but instead becomes fascinated by Jack's incompetence. After permitting Jack to read aloud Jack's favorite story, Donald soon takes over when the words get too tough. As Jack slips into drowsiness, he hears this story: A muddleheaded boy named Jack lives with his mother in a village that is terrorized by a giant. The giant has stolen the royal jewels, so Princess Eloise must marry Prince Arthur from a nearby kingdom, sight unseen, for the sake of the kingdom. On her way to be married, she stops for a drink of water at Jack's house. The giant has also stolen the village's food, making times so hard that Jack's mother orders him to sell their only cow, Henry, to the butcher, Mr. Dinkelpuss. On the way, Jack meets the prince, who confides that he is unimpressed with a princess who would marry for money. As they talk, they hear the giant nearby and when the rumbling settles, Jack realizes that the prince is gone. In the village, Dinkelpuss tricks Jack into accepting five magic beans for Henry, instead of money, but then loses ... +


Lovebirds Eloise Larkin and Arthur Royal, who are performing in an amateur theatrical production, have a dress rehearsal to attend, but Eloise must first find a baby-sitter for her siblings, a baby sister and a precocious eight-year-old brother, Donald. As no baby-sitter will watch the mischievous Donald more than once, Eloise calls Polly, a very tall person who runs an employment agency. Before going on a date with her boyfriend, the colossal Sgt. Riley, Polly sends Jack and his "agent," Mr. Dinkel, to the Larkin house. When Jack and Dinkel arrive, Donald is ready to terrorize, but instead becomes fascinated by Jack's incompetence. After permitting Jack to read aloud Jack's favorite story, Donald soon takes over when the words get too tough. As Jack slips into drowsiness, he hears this story: A muddleheaded boy named Jack lives with his mother in a village that is terrorized by a giant. The giant has stolen the royal jewels, so Princess Eloise must marry Prince Arthur from a nearby kingdom, sight unseen, for the sake of the kingdom. On her way to be married, she stops for a drink of water at Jack's house. The giant has also stolen the village's food, making times so hard that Jack's mother orders him to sell their only cow, Henry, to the butcher, Mr. Dinkelpuss. On the way, Jack meets the prince, who confides that he is unimpressed with a princess who would marry for money. As they talk, they hear the giant nearby and when the rumbling settles, Jack realizes that the prince is gone. In the village, Dinkelpuss tricks Jack into accepting five magic beans for Henry, instead of money, but then loses Henry to the giant. Meanwhile, Jack happily heads home, until he learns from the villagers that the giant stole the princess. At home, Jack tells his mother about the stolen princess and the magic beans. Resigned to Jack's stupidity, she has him plant the beans, hoping that they at least might grow into something edible. By morning the beans have become a towering beanstalk that Jack decides to climb, telling his mother that he will avenge his father's death at the hands of the giant, save the princess and find Nellie, their stolen hen who lays golden eggs. After hearing about the hen, Dinkelpuss decides to follow Jack up the beanstalk. At the top, Jack and Dinkelpuss see the castle, but on their way there, the giant catches them and takes them as prisoners. Meanwhile, in the castle, the prince and princess are locked up and overseen by the giant's giant housekeeper, Polly, and Patrick, a talking harp. As both want to be liked for themselves and not their royal status, neither informs the other of his or her true identity. However, the prince, pretending to be a troubadour, wins the heart of the princess with his singing. Jack and Dinkelpuss are put to work, but arrange for the prince and princess to meet for a moonlight stroll in the garden. Watching them, Polly and Jack are inspired to dance together. Polly, who is willing to help, Polly suggests they can escape using the trunks of skinny trees to catapult them beyond the walls of the locked garden. The next morning, Jack almost becomes the giant's breakfast, but Polly and the others knock out the giant with a log. Unable to exit through the locked door, they escape by swinging on a chandelier through a high window, out to the garden. Almost everyone, including Henry and Nellie, gets out, but Jack is delayed when the giant awakens. After a vigorous fight, Jack reunites with the others in the garden, but when it is his turn to be catapulted over the garden walls, he forgets to get on the tree and is left behind. Finally, Jack climbs the wall, but the giant follows him. The rest of the group climbs down the beanstalk, and Dinkelpuss reports Jack's heroic death to the waiting villagers. When the king arrives for the marriage ceremony, the prince and princess are both unhappy to learn that they have been deceiving each other, but soon make up. Then Jack is spotted climbing down the stalk, with the giant close behind him. On the ground, Jack grabs an ax and chops down the beanstalk, causing the giant to fall to the earth, then through it, all the way to China. As the villagers cheer, their hero kneels before the king to be crowned. Back at the Larkin household, Jack is awakened when Donald crowns him with a vase. Eloise and Arthur return from their rehearsal, and Jack, confusing the story with reality, leaves the house filled with delusions of grandeur. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.