All This, and Heaven Too (1940)

140 or 143 mins | Drama | 13 July 1940

Director:

Anatole Litvak

Writer:

Casey Robinson

Cinematographer:

Ernest Haller

Editor:

Warren Low

Production Designer:

Carl Jules Weyl

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to news items in HR , Warner Bros. originally wanted Helen Hayes or Miriam Hopkins to star in this film. Life notes that the picture set a new record for number of sets erected, with a total of sixty seven. Life also states that the novel from which it was adapted is allegedly based on the experiences of Rachel Lyman Field's great aunt, who was known as "Mlle. D." According to Bette Davis' autobiography, Warner Bros. purchased the rights to the story for $100,000, and the budget for this film was set at $1,370,000. Davis also notes that the producers paid $1,000 for each of her thirty-five costumes. Material contained in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library adds that Joseph I. Breen insisted that Warner Bros. change the original character of the Abbe Gillard because he was too sinister, and because religious figures were not allowed to be villains. The picture received the following Academy Award nominations: Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress (Barbara O'Neil), and Best Cinematography (Ernest Haller). It also was included in FD 's "ten best" list of 1940. Modern sources add that associate producer David Lewis wanted Greta Garbo to play the role of ... More Less

According to news items in HR , Warner Bros. originally wanted Helen Hayes or Miriam Hopkins to star in this film. Life notes that the picture set a new record for number of sets erected, with a total of sixty seven. Life also states that the novel from which it was adapted is allegedly based on the experiences of Rachel Lyman Field's great aunt, who was known as "Mlle. D." According to Bette Davis' autobiography, Warner Bros. purchased the rights to the story for $100,000, and the budget for this film was set at $1,370,000. Davis also notes that the producers paid $1,000 for each of her thirty-five costumes. Material contained in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library adds that Joseph I. Breen insisted that Warner Bros. change the original character of the Abbe Gillard because he was too sinister, and because religious figures were not allowed to be villains. The picture received the following Academy Award nominations: Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress (Barbara O'Neil), and Best Cinematography (Ernest Haller). It also was included in FD 's "ten best" list of 1940. Modern sources add that associate producer David Lewis wanted Greta Garbo to play the role of Henriette. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Jun 40
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 Jun 40
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 39
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jan 40
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Feb 40
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jun 40
p. 3.
Life
1 Jun 1940 v.9
pp. 35-36.
Motion Picture Daily
17 Jun 40
pp. 1-4.
Motion Picture Herald
22 Jun 40
p. 44.
New York Times
5 Jul 40
p. 10.
Variety
12 Jun 40
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture; Jack L. Warner in charge of production; An Anatole Litvak Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Orch arr
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel All This, and Heaven Too by Rachel Lyman Field (New York, 1938).
SONGS
"Lotus Song" and "The War of Roses," words and music by Jack Scholl and M. K. Jerome.
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 July 1940
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 5 July 1940
Production Date:
began 7 February 1940
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
12 July 1940
Copyright Number:
LP9763
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
140 or 143
Length(in reels):
15
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6089
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At a New York girls' school, a teacher is taunted by her students to tell the tale of the tragic romance that preceded her undeserved notoriety as "Mademoiselle D:" In 1846, Henriette Deluzy-Desportes voyages from England to France to apply for the position of governess in the household of the Duc de Praslin. Once hired, Henriette enters a house that has been poisoned by the insane and neurotic love that the Duchesse bears her husband, the Duc. Finding that her four charges have been emotionally abused and neglected, Henriette works to establish an atmosphere of warmth and love that the children have never known. The Duc, who despises his crazed wife, responds to Henriette's kindness and concern, and an honorable bond of understanding blossoms between them. When this friendship causes gossip, the Duc stops seeing Henriette and effects a facade of reconciliation to placate his jealous wife. He finds that he is unable to foresake his friendship with Henriette, however, and visits her and the children at his family estate in Melan, where they are spending the holidays. After a few fleeting days of happiness, the Duchesse and her wealthy father, the Marechal Sabastiani, appear and dismiss Henriette with the promise of a forthcoming letter of reference. The letter is never sent, however, and Henriette, unable to obtain a job without it, is forced into poverty. When the Duc discovers this, he confronts his vindictive wife and, in an insane rage, murders her. After Henriette is imprisoned for complicity in the murder, the Duc takes his own life rather that implicate her in his crime, and she is released for lack of ... +


At a New York girls' school, a teacher is taunted by her students to tell the tale of the tragic romance that preceded her undeserved notoriety as "Mademoiselle D:" In 1846, Henriette Deluzy-Desportes voyages from England to France to apply for the position of governess in the household of the Duc de Praslin. Once hired, Henriette enters a house that has been poisoned by the insane and neurotic love that the Duchesse bears her husband, the Duc. Finding that her four charges have been emotionally abused and neglected, Henriette works to establish an atmosphere of warmth and love that the children have never known. The Duc, who despises his crazed wife, responds to Henriette's kindness and concern, and an honorable bond of understanding blossoms between them. When this friendship causes gossip, the Duc stops seeing Henriette and effects a facade of reconciliation to placate his jealous wife. He finds that he is unable to foresake his friendship with Henriette, however, and visits her and the children at his family estate in Melan, where they are spending the holidays. After a few fleeting days of happiness, the Duchesse and her wealthy father, the Marechal Sabastiani, appear and dismiss Henriette with the promise of a forthcoming letter of reference. The letter is never sent, however, and Henriette, unable to obtain a job without it, is forced into poverty. When the Duc discovers this, he confronts his vindictive wife and, in an insane rage, murders her. After Henriette is imprisoned for complicity in the murder, the Duc takes his own life rather that implicate her in his crime, and she is released for lack of evidence. Henriette is then befriended by the kindly Henry Martyn Field, a fellow passenger on her earlier voyage to France, who finds her the job at Miss Haines School for girls in New York. Upon hearing her tragic story, the girls award her their friendship and sympathy, and Henriette faces a happier life with her students and Henry at her side. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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