The Marrying Kind (1952)

92 mins | Comedy-drama | April 1952

Director:

George Cukor

Producer:

Bert Granet

Cinematographer:

Joseph Walker

Editor:

Charles Nelson

Production Designer:

John Meehan

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

A HR news item indicated that producer S. Sylvan Simon was set to produce The Marrying Kind , but Simon died in May 1951 and Bert Granet was assigned to the picture. Director George Cukor was borrowed from M-G-M for the film. As noted in a Sep 1951 NYT article, portions of the film were shot on location in New York City. Madge Kennedy, who played "Judge Carroll," had been a former silent film star; The Marrying Kind was her first screen appearance in movies in twenty-eight years.
       The Marrying Kind marked Aldo Ray's first starring role. Although a NYT article noted that his name had been changed from his real name Aldo DaRe to John Harrison, he is billed as Aldo Ray. His onscreen credit reads "Introducing Aldo Ray," although he actually made his debut in Columbia's 1951 picture Saturday's Hero under the name Aldo DaRe. The following statement appears onscreen at the conclusion of the movie over a medium shot of Ray: "You have just seen our New Personality Aldo Ray. Please watch for his next picture." ... More Less

A HR news item indicated that producer S. Sylvan Simon was set to produce The Marrying Kind , but Simon died in May 1951 and Bert Granet was assigned to the picture. Director George Cukor was borrowed from M-G-M for the film. As noted in a Sep 1951 NYT article, portions of the film were shot on location in New York City. Madge Kennedy, who played "Judge Carroll," had been a former silent film star; The Marrying Kind was her first screen appearance in movies in twenty-eight years.
       The Marrying Kind marked Aldo Ray's first starring role. Although a NYT article noted that his name had been changed from his real name Aldo DaRe to John Harrison, he is billed as Aldo Ray. His onscreen credit reads "Introducing Aldo Ray," although he actually made his debut in Columbia's 1951 picture Saturday's Hero under the name Aldo DaRe. The following statement appears onscreen at the conclusion of the movie over a medium shot of Ray: "You have just seen our New Personality Aldo Ray. Please watch for his next picture." More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
15 Mar 1952.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jun 1951.
---
Daily Variety
11 Mar 1952.
---
Daily Variety
12 Mar 52
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 Mar 52
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 51
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Aug 51
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Sep 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 51
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 51
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Mar 52
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
15 Mar 52
p. 1281.
New York Times
23 Sep 1951.
---
New York Times
13 Mar 52
p. 25.
New York Times
14 Mar 52
p. 27.
Variety
12 Mar 52
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus score
SOUND
Sd eng
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
SOURCES
SONGS
"Dolores," words by Frank Loesser, music by Louis Alter
"That Old Black Magic," words by Johnny Mercer, music by Harold Arlen.
DETAILS
Release Date:
April 1952
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 13 March 1952
Production Date:
17 September--17 November 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
14 March 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1554
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
92
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15569
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the New York Court of Domestic Relations, Judge Anna Carroll presides over the divorce hearing of Florence and Chet Keefer, whose lawyers insist their clients' marriage is over. As it is late, the judge calls a recess, then summons the Keefers to her chambers, where she asks them how they met. Chet hesitates, then relates the early days of their marriage: In Central Park, Chet and his friend and fellow postal worker, George Bastian, introduce themselves to two attractive young women and soon they begin double dating. Chet and Florence marry shortly thereafter and honeymoon in Atlantic City before setting up house in a tiny apartment with very little furniture. Florence complains about Chet's long hours, while at the post office, his work buddies kid him about his marriage. Chet confides in George that he has great aspirations to make something of himself. Back in the judge's chamber, Judge Carroll asks Florence and Chet when the first sign of trouble appeared in their relationship. Florence explains that Chet began placing his ambitions and other people before her and he was always envious of his sister Joan's husband, Howard Shipley, a successful businessman. Florence takes up their story: Chet is uncomfortable about attending a formal party thrown by Joan and Howard, celebrating their trip to Europe. Delayed repeatedly at work, Chet is late picking Florence up and at the party, he feels like the excluded "poor relation." To Florence's annoyance, Chet drinks too much and rumbas enthusiastically with a voluptuous guest. Later that night, Chet and Florence argue about his behavior and she pushes him off her bed. That night, Chet has a nightmare that ... +


In the New York Court of Domestic Relations, Judge Anna Carroll presides over the divorce hearing of Florence and Chet Keefer, whose lawyers insist their clients' marriage is over. As it is late, the judge calls a recess, then summons the Keefers to her chambers, where she asks them how they met. Chet hesitates, then relates the early days of their marriage: In Central Park, Chet and his friend and fellow postal worker, George Bastian, introduce themselves to two attractive young women and soon they begin double dating. Chet and Florence marry shortly thereafter and honeymoon in Atlantic City before setting up house in a tiny apartment with very little furniture. Florence complains about Chet's long hours, while at the post office, his work buddies kid him about his marriage. Chet confides in George that he has great aspirations to make something of himself. Back in the judge's chamber, Judge Carroll asks Florence and Chet when the first sign of trouble appeared in their relationship. Florence explains that Chet began placing his ambitions and other people before her and he was always envious of his sister Joan's husband, Howard Shipley, a successful businessman. Florence takes up their story: Chet is uncomfortable about attending a formal party thrown by Joan and Howard, celebrating their trip to Europe. Delayed repeatedly at work, Chet is late picking Florence up and at the party, he feels like the excluded "poor relation." To Florence's annoyance, Chet drinks too much and rumbas enthusiastically with a voluptuous guest. Later that night, Chet and Florence argue about his behavior and she pushes him off her bed. That night, Chet has a nightmare that at work his carelessness with loose ball bearings causes the Postmaster General injury. When Florence awakens him, however, he gets a flash of insight and feverishly begins designing a pair of ball bearing sliders, similar to roller skates. Chet has the sliders built and takes them to Howard to get his financial backing. Florence talks Howard into trying on the sliders, but when he falls down, Joan furiously orders Florence and Chet out. A few days later, Florence and Chet each discover a magazine report about an identical invention of sliders introduced by a former champion skater, and Florence comforts the despondent Chet. After Florence's disclosure, Judge Carroll asks the Keefers why there is no hope for their marriage. Florence claims they never got a break, and Chet declares that everything would have been fine had his slider invention worked. When Judge Carroll presses Florence to explain what she expected from marriage, she laments that she feels lonely even when she is in the same room with Chet. He protests that even if he was not always thinking of her, he was thinking of their marriage and that he always loved her. Chet resumes the Keefers' story: Florence frets over Chet's concern about expenses when taking their children, Joey and Ellen, camping. At home one evening, Florence and Chet are stunned when a radio broadcaster announces that Florence has been selected to answer their $2,600 question. When the station telephones her and plays a bit of music for her to identify, she names the tune, but Chet disagrees and she gives the station his answer, which is incorrect. Sometime later, the Keefers attend a Decoration Day picnic with their children, and Joey accidentally drowns, leaving Florence and Chet desolate. Lost in thought over his son one day, Chet is hit by a truck while crossing the street, requiring extensive hospitalization and then time in a convalescent home, where Florence and Ellen constantly visit. While there, Chet grudgingly admits Florence must go back to work to help meet their expenses. Resuming work at the post office, Chet receives a promotion, but the news is dulled when Florence gets a letter informing her that her former boss has died and left her $1,284. Chet demands to know what she did to be left so much money, but Florence has no idea. Chet stews about the money, then finally gives Florence permission to accept it. When she tells him that she already has, he explodes in anger and threatens to walk out, but Florence leaves instead. All the Keefers' friends offer advice on how to patch up their marriage and even the discovery that Florence's boss left all his employees money does not help. At the end of their story, Judge Carroll points out to the Keefers that they have had good times and bad times and that wrong headedness does not mean their marriage is over. She then bids the Keefers goodnight and in the hallway tells the bailiff she does not believe the Keefers will be in court the following day. In the judge's chambers, Chet says he may not be able to change his delusions of grandeur, but he can try, and Florence agrees to try too. The Keefers leave the office arm in arm. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.