Pat and Mike (1952)

94-95 mins | Comedy | 13 June 1952

Director:

George Cukor

Cinematographer:

William Daniels

Editor:

George Boemler

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Urie McCleary

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

According to various HR news items, James Arness, Frank Otto and Alan Dinehart, III were cast, but they were not in the released film. Portions of the film were shot on location at the Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles and in the Cow Palace in San Francisco. Several popular golf and tennis stars portrayed themselves in the film, including Babe Didrikson Zaharias, the most celebrated woman golfer of all time. According to the film's presskit, Frank Parker, who appeared as himself in the film, also acted as a technical advisor and tennis coach to Katharine Hepburn.
       According to contemporary and modern sources, Hepburn, an excellent athlete in real life, did all of her own tennis and golf scenes in Pat and Mike . According to biographical sources, Hepburn was a junior golf champion as a child, and press materials noted that Hepburn was once a runner-up in the Connecticut Women's Golf Championship. As noted in some reviews and modern sources, the sports sequences in the film were filmed in a newsreel/documentary style.
       Modern sources have commented on the effectiveness of Spencer Tracy's use of a "Bronx" accent in his portrayal of "Mike Conovon." In a scene from the film that is often shown in documentaries about Tracy and Hepburn's careers and offscreen relationship, "Mike" looks at "Pat" and remarks, "Not much meat on her, but what's there is 'cherce.'" Pat and Mike was the seventh of nine co-starring films for Tracy and Hepburn, and the second of two collaborations with writers Garson Kanin and Ruth Gordon, who also wrote their popular 1949 film Adam's ... More Less

According to various HR news items, James Arness, Frank Otto and Alan Dinehart, III were cast, but they were not in the released film. Portions of the film were shot on location at the Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles and in the Cow Palace in San Francisco. Several popular golf and tennis stars portrayed themselves in the film, including Babe Didrikson Zaharias, the most celebrated woman golfer of all time. According to the film's presskit, Frank Parker, who appeared as himself in the film, also acted as a technical advisor and tennis coach to Katharine Hepburn.
       According to contemporary and modern sources, Hepburn, an excellent athlete in real life, did all of her own tennis and golf scenes in Pat and Mike . According to biographical sources, Hepburn was a junior golf champion as a child, and press materials noted that Hepburn was once a runner-up in the Connecticut Women's Golf Championship. As noted in some reviews and modern sources, the sports sequences in the film were filmed in a newsreel/documentary style.
       Modern sources have commented on the effectiveness of Spencer Tracy's use of a "Bronx" accent in his portrayal of "Mike Conovon." In a scene from the film that is often shown in documentaries about Tracy and Hepburn's careers and offscreen relationship, "Mike" looks at "Pat" and remarks, "Not much meat on her, but what's there is 'cherce.'" Pat and Mike was the seventh of nine co-starring films for Tracy and Hepburn, and the second of two collaborations with writers Garson Kanin and Ruth Gordon, who also wrote their popular 1949 film Adam's Rib (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50 ).
       Kanin and Gordon received an Academy Award nomination for their story and screenplay. According to a 1973 DV news item, a television series based on the film was being developed for comedian Buddy Hackett, but the series was never aired. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 May 1952.
---
Daily Variety
13 May 1952
p. 3.
Daily Variety
10 Apr 1973.
---
Film Daily
15 May 1952
p. 6.
Hollywood Citizen-News
17 Jun 1952.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Nov 1951
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 1951
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jan 1952
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jan 1952
p. 5, 8.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jan 1952
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jan 1952
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Feb 1952
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Feb 1952
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
13 May 1952
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
19 Jun 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 May 1952
p. 1365.
New York Times
18 Jun 1952
p. 31.
New York Times
19 Jun 1952
p. 32.
New Yorker
28 Jun 1952.
---
Newsweek
23 Jun 1952.
---
Time
16 Jun 1952.
---
Variety
14 May 1952
p. 6.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
George Mathews
Charles Buchinski
And sports stars
Frank Parker
Billy McLean
Helen Eby-Rock
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Katharine Hepburn's ward
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hair styles
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Tech adv
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 June 1952
Production Date:
early January--mid February 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
12 May 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1732
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
94-95
Length(in feet):
8,525
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15819
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Widow Pat Pemberton, the women’s athletic coach at Pacific Technical College, excels at sports, but becomes unnerved whenever her pompous fiancé, college administrator Collier Weld, is watching. Collier wants Pat to be the golf partner of potential donor Mr. Beminger, in a foursome with himself and Mrs. Beminger, and insists she play her best so that Beminger will win. During the game, Pat becomes so tense under Collier’s reproachful gaze that she ruins a number of shots, causing her and Beminger to lose. While Collier tries to calm Beminger, Pat becomes so annoyed by Mrs. Beminger’s condescending golf tips that she angrily grabs a club and makes a rapid succession of perfect drives. Golf pro Charles Barry is so impressed by Pat’s skill that he asks her to represent the club at the national women’s amateur championship. She is hesitant at first, but after an argument with Collier, whom she feels has no confidence in her abilities, agrees. At the end of the first day of the tournament, Pat is only four strokes behind the lead, Babe Didrikson Zaharias, and is feeling confident. Pat’s performance is admiringly observed by sports agent Mike Conovan, who is determined to manage her. That evening, Mike offers to become her agent, suggesting that it would be better financially if she lost this tournament and gradually built up her reputation. Although Pat turns down the offer, saying it is dishonest, she impresses Mike. The next day, Pat is on the verge of winning but again becomes so unnerved when she sees Collier watching that she loses the tournament on the last putt. Collier and Pat ... +


Widow Pat Pemberton, the women’s athletic coach at Pacific Technical College, excels at sports, but becomes unnerved whenever her pompous fiancé, college administrator Collier Weld, is watching. Collier wants Pat to be the golf partner of potential donor Mr. Beminger, in a foursome with himself and Mrs. Beminger, and insists she play her best so that Beminger will win. During the game, Pat becomes so tense under Collier’s reproachful gaze that she ruins a number of shots, causing her and Beminger to lose. While Collier tries to calm Beminger, Pat becomes so annoyed by Mrs. Beminger’s condescending golf tips that she angrily grabs a club and makes a rapid succession of perfect drives. Golf pro Charles Barry is so impressed by Pat’s skill that he asks her to represent the club at the national women’s amateur championship. She is hesitant at first, but after an argument with Collier, whom she feels has no confidence in her abilities, agrees. At the end of the first day of the tournament, Pat is only four strokes behind the lead, Babe Didrikson Zaharias, and is feeling confident. Pat’s performance is admiringly observed by sports agent Mike Conovan, who is determined to manage her. That evening, Mike offers to become her agent, suggesting that it would be better financially if she lost this tournament and gradually built up her reputation. Although Pat turns down the offer, saying it is dishonest, she impresses Mike. The next day, Pat is on the verge of winning but again becomes so unnerved when she sees Collier watching that she loses the tournament on the last putt. Collier and Pat later argue over his bullying, prompting Pat to reconsider Mike’s offer. When she travels to Mike’s office in New York, he is overjoyed when she says that golf is actually her weakest sport and promises to promote her into “queen of the world.” After demonstrating her skills at tennis and target shooting, Pat signs a contract with Mike, who immediately takes charge of her training and insists that she give up liquor, cigarettes, late hours and Collier. In the ensuing months, Pat becomes a national celebrity after winning several tennis tournaments, partnered with such stars as Frank Parker and Don Budge. By the time she arrives in San Francisco, Pat exudes confidence, but when Collier and some of her students come to watch her at the Cow Palace, she sees them laughing and her confidence vanishes. After imagining that the net is huge and her racket tiny, she pictures Collier as the referee and passes out, losing the tournament to Gussie Moran. Later, Collier tries to convince Pat to come home, but Mike angrily accuses him of being the reason why Pat lost and implies that some of Pat’s “owners” would not like his interference. Pat then surprises Mike by crying that no one owns her, then sending Collier away. Pat soon joins Mike at his training camp for dim-witted boxer Davie Hucko. As Pat and Mike grow closer, she admits knowing that it is Collier who is causing her to lose, but assumes that it is because she is in love with him. Mike begins to realize his attraction to Pat after looking at a photograph of her and Collier and imagining himself in the picture. The next day, as Mike is giving Pat a leg massage, Collier calls, asking to see her. Feeling Pat’s leg muscles go limp, Mike grabs the phone and orders Collier to stay away. He then tells Pat that, while they are equal partners, “five-oh, five-oh,” she could never be “five-oh, five-oh” with Collier. The night before the next national women’s golf tournament, Mike’s “anonymous investors” arrive at the hotel, hoping to convince Pat, who is the odds-on favorite, to throw the match so that they win large sums betting against her. Mike refuses, but after the men leave, a worried Pat offers to lose, saying she wants to share Mike’s troubles "five-oh, five-oh." Mike again refuses, then, at dinner, two of the investors come to their table to force Mike outside. Despite Mike’s insistence that she not interfere, Pat goes outside and sees the men physically threatening Mike. She sneaks up behind one of men, pulls at his trouser legs and makes him fall, then disables the other man. After receiving applause from other diners, they are all taken to the police station, where Pat and investor Hank Tasling reenact what has happened, trying to convince the police captain that it was just a joke. He finally lets them all go and tells Pat that his money is on her. Outside the station, Mike laments creating a “Mrs. Frankenstein” and says he wants the kind of "five-oh, five-oh" in which a “he is a he” and a “she is a she.” Back at the hotel, Collier arrives and tries to grab one of Pat’s arms, while Mike takes the other, prompting Pat to run away. Late that night, while Pat is asleep, Mike goes into her room, closes the window and gently covers her with a blanket. He tries to sneak out, but starts to sneeze, thus waking Pat. She is startled, but touched when he explains that he checks on her every night, just to make sure she does not kick off her blankets. As Mike leaves, he is observed by Collier, who assumes the worst and angrily confronts Pat. She then screams for Mike, who rushes back and unsuccessfully tries to overpower Collier. When Pat implies that something has been going on between herself and Mike, Collier hastily leaves. Although surprised by Pat’s words, Mike shakes her hand, saying together they can lick the world, with everything "five-oh, five-oh." During the tournament, Pat is in the lead when, on a critical putt, she looks up and sees Collier’s disapproving face. Although momentarily shaken, she then looks at Mike’s encouraging face and easily makes the shot. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.