What Price Glory (1952)

109-111 mins | Comedy-drama | August 1952

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Charmaine. According to a May 1951 HR news item, the film was originally to be a musical with Micheline Prelle starring as "Charmaine." Although contemporary sources reported that the song "Charmaine," written by Erno Rapee and Lew Pollack, was to be sung in the film by Dan Dailey and James Cagney, it appears only as background music in the completed picture. ["Charmaine" was an important part of the score for the 1926 version of What Price Glory.] A number of other songs announced for inclusion in the picture also did not appear in the released film. According to modern sources, Cagney signed on as a cast member in the belief that the picture was to be a musical, but director John Ford, who had directed the play in Hollywood in 1949, did not want to turn the material into a musical. Modern sources also note that Ford had hoped to cast John Wayne, who had appeared in the 1949 run of the play, in the picture. Although HR news items include the following actors in the cast, their appearance in the completed picture has not been confirmed: Bill Scully , Mae Marsh and Walter Vernon, the father of Wally Vernon. Contemporary sources note that the picture was partially shot on location at the Marine base in Camp Pendleton, CA.
       A modern source includes Paul Guilfoyle in the cast, but he was not in the viewed print. The picture marked the screen debut of Marisa Pavan, who was the twin sister of actress Pier Angeli. Fox Film Corp. ...

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The working title of this film was Charmaine. According to a May 1951 HR news item, the film was originally to be a musical with Micheline Prelle starring as "Charmaine." Although contemporary sources reported that the song "Charmaine," written by Erno Rapee and Lew Pollack, was to be sung in the film by Dan Dailey and James Cagney, it appears only as background music in the completed picture. ["Charmaine" was an important part of the score for the 1926 version of What Price Glory.] A number of other songs announced for inclusion in the picture also did not appear in the released film. According to modern sources, Cagney signed on as a cast member in the belief that the picture was to be a musical, but director John Ford, who had directed the play in Hollywood in 1949, did not want to turn the material into a musical. Modern sources also note that Ford had hoped to cast John Wayne, who had appeared in the 1949 run of the play, in the picture. Although HR news items include the following actors in the cast, their appearance in the completed picture has not been confirmed: Bill Scully , Mae Marsh and Walter Vernon, the father of Wally Vernon. Contemporary sources note that the picture was partially shot on location at the Marine base in Camp Pendleton, CA.
       A modern source includes Paul Guilfoyle in the cast, but he was not in the viewed print. The picture marked the screen debut of Marisa Pavan, who was the twin sister of actress Pier Angeli. Fox Film Corp. first filmed Maxwell Anderson and Laurence Stallings' play in 1926. The earlier version was directed by Raoul Walsh and starred Victor McLaglen, Edmund Lowe and Dolores Del Rio. McLaglen and Lowe reprised their roles for Fox in three sequels featuring the characters of "Flagg" and "Quirt": the 1929 picture The Cock-Eyed World, directed by Raoul Walsh; the 1931 film Women of All Nations, also directed by Walsh; and the 1933 release Hot Pepper, directed by John Blystone (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 and AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40). Although a 20 Jan 1947 LAT news item reported that independent production company Enterprise was interested in acquiring the property as a starring vehicle for William Conrad, that production was never realized.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
2 Aug 1952
---
Daily Variety
28 Jul 1952
p. 3
Film Daily
30 Jul 1952
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 1951
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
12 Oct 1951
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 1951
p. 15
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 1951
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
27 Dec 1951
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jan 1952
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 1952
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jan 1952
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 1952
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 1952
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 1952
p. 9
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jul 1952
p. 3
Los Angeles Examiner
12 Oct 1951
---
Los Angeles Examiner
15 Aug 1952
---
Los Angeles Times
20 Jan 1947
---
Los Angeles Times
16 Aug 1952
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
2 Aug 1952
p. 1469
New York Times
9 Sep 1951
---
New York Times
23 Aug 1952
p. 10
New York Times
31 Aug 1952
---
Time
18 Aug 1952
---
Variety
30 Jul 1952
p. 6
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Bill Henry
William Yetter Sr.
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Joe MacDonald
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward dir
Cost des
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Billy Daniel
Dances staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Military tech adv
STAND INS
Stand-in for James Gleason
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play What Price Glory? by Maxwell Anderson and Laurence Stallings (New York, 3 Sep 1924).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
MUSIC
"Charmaine" by Erno Rapee and Lew Pollack.
SONGS
"My Love, My Life," music and lyrics by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans, French lyrics by Tanis Chandler; "Oui, Oui, Marie," music by Fred Fisher, lyrics by Alfred Bryan and Joe McCarthy; "It's a Long, Long Way to Tipperary," music and lyrics by Jack Judge and Harry Williams, additional lyrics by Eliot Daniel.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Charmaine
Release Date:
August 1952
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Atlantic City, NJ: 25 Jul 1952; Los Angeles opening: 15 Aug 1952; New York opening: 22 Aug 1952
Production Date:
mid Dec 1951--early Feb 1952
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
15 August 1952
LP1902
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
109-111
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15706
SYNOPSIS

During World War I, the first American troops to fight in France are veteran Marines who have fought all over the globe. Company L, returning from the front, is led to its home base of Bar-le-Duc by Capt. Flagg and lieutenants Aldrich and Moore, Cpl. Kiper, Sgt. Moran and Lipinsky. Flagg is happy to reunite with his French sweetheart, curvaceous barmaid Charmaine, but is annoyed by her plea to accompany him on his upcoming leave in Paris. Flagg lies, telling Charmaine that he is married, and the next day, reviews his new troops. The untrained youths both try Flagg's patience and make him fear for their safety, so he anxiously awaits his new "top sergeant," who will train them for battle. Unfortunately, the new man is Sgt. Quirt, Flagg's longtime rival and friend, and the two at once resume their ritual of brawling upon seeing each other. Flagg knocks Quirt down, then rejects his transfer request and orders him to whip the recruits into shape while he is away. While Flagg is gone, Quirt works the new men hard and romances Charmaine, as another newcomer, young Lewisohn, falls in love with local girl Nicole Bouchard. Upon Flagg's return, he learns that the company is being sent to the front, and also receives a complaint from Charmaine's father, innkeeper Cognac Pete, that a soldier has trifled with her affections and should be forced to marry her. Flagg is infuriated to discover that the culprit is Quirt, who had stolen other girl friends from him in the past, but gets his revenge by ordering Quirt to marry Charmaine immediately. While Quirt is being hustled off to ...

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During World War I, the first American troops to fight in France are veteran Marines who have fought all over the globe. Company L, returning from the front, is led to its home base of Bar-le-Duc by Capt. Flagg and lieutenants Aldrich and Moore, Cpl. Kiper, Sgt. Moran and Lipinsky. Flagg is happy to reunite with his French sweetheart, curvaceous barmaid Charmaine, but is annoyed by her plea to accompany him on his upcoming leave in Paris. Flagg lies, telling Charmaine that he is married, and the next day, reviews his new troops. The untrained youths both try Flagg's patience and make him fear for their safety, so he anxiously awaits his new "top sergeant," who will train them for battle. Unfortunately, the new man is Sgt. Quirt, Flagg's longtime rival and friend, and the two at once resume their ritual of brawling upon seeing each other. Flagg knocks Quirt down, then rejects his transfer request and orders him to whip the recruits into shape while he is away. While Flagg is gone, Quirt works the new men hard and romances Charmaine, as another newcomer, young Lewisohn, falls in love with local girl Nicole Bouchard. Upon Flagg's return, he learns that the company is being sent to the front, and also receives a complaint from Charmaine's father, innkeeper Cognac Pete, that a soldier has trifled with her affections and should be forced to marry her. Flagg is infuriated to discover that the culprit is Quirt, who had stolen other girl friends from him in the past, but gets his revenge by ordering Quirt to marry Charmaine immediately. While Quirt is being hustled off to the ceremony, Lewisohn asks Flagg for permission to marry Nicole. Flagg, who has spent his life avoiding marriage, urges Lewisohn to wait, and then goes to watch Quirt and Charmaine's wedding. Quirt is nonplussed that Charmaine readily agrees to the marriage, but wiggles his way out of the situation when he deduces the company is about to move out. Realizing that he cannot jail his top sergeant for disobedience and leave him behind, Flagg grudgingly gives Quirt a reprieve and the men march to the front. During the prolonged fighting, Flagg is enraged by the deaths of his soldiers, many of whom are barely more than boys. Needing to capture a German officer who can confirm intelligence reports about enemy movements, Flagg sends Lt. Moore on a reconaissance mission. Moore is killed, however, and the wounded Aldrich goads Flagg and Quirt into going themselves. As they crawl through the mud, Flagg and Quirt both realize that they love Charmaine and want to give up their long-valued freedom to marry her. After taking a German-held farmhouse, the Americans succeed in capturing a German colonel, but he is killed in a barrage. Quirt is injured in the blast, and jovially torments Flagg with the knowledge that he will be returning to Bar-le-Duc first. When they arrive back at the trenches, Quirt and Flagg are delighted to learn that Lewisohn has captured a German officer, but their joy turns to horror when Lewisohn is killed by an enemy barrage. Flagg is further infuriated when Gen. Cokely reneges on his promise to return the men to safety after they capture a German. Flagg bitterly leads his men deeper into enemy territory, while in the village, Quirt sneaks out of the military hospital to visit Charmaine. Quirt tells Charmaine that he wants to marry her, but before he can, Flagg returns from the front and insists that he will marry the barmaid. Tired of the senseless killing, Flagg confesses that he is not married and wants to raise a family, but when Charmaine cannot make up her mind between him and Quirt, the two men begin a drunken brawl. They eventually decide to play poker, with Quirt's pistol as the stake, and the victor is to shoot his rival, then marry Charmaine. Flagg, who does not hold the winning hand, bluffs and shoots at Quirt as he runs from the inn, but before he can celebrate, Lipinsky announces that the company has received orders to move out again. The morose Flagg refuses to leave, but then, realizing that his first duty is to his men, bids farewell to Charmaine and urges her to marry Quirt. As they are marching away, however, Quirt limps after his comrades, and a smiling Flagg hands him a rifle.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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