The Affairs of Dobie Gillis (1953)

72-74 mins | Romantic comedy | 14 August 1953

Director:

Don Weis

Writer:

Max Shulman

Producer:

Arthur M. Loew Jr.

Cinematographer:

William C. Mellor

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Leonid Vasian

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis . Dancer-choreographer-director Bob Fosse (1927--1987) made his feature film debut in the film. The Affairs of Dobie Gillis inspired a television show, The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis , which starred Dwayne Hickman as "Dobie" and ran on the CBS network from ... More Less

The working title of this film was The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis . Dancer-choreographer-director Bob Fosse (1927--1987) made his feature film debut in the film. The Affairs of Dobie Gillis inspired a television show, The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis , which starred Dwayne Hickman as "Dobie" and ran on the CBS network from 1959--1963. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
13 Jun 1953.
---
Daily Variety
29 May 53
p. 3.
Film Daily
2 Jun 53
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jan 53
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Feb 53
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
29 May 53
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
3 Jun 1953.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Jun 53
p. 1862.
Variety
3 Jun 53
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Mont seq
DANCE
Dances staged by
MAKEUP
Hair styles
SOURCES
SONGS
"All I Do Is Dream of You," words by Arthur Freed, music by Nacio Herb Brown
"I'm Through with Love," words by Gus Kahn, music by Matt Malneck and Fud Livingston
"You Wonderful You," words by Saul Chaplin and Jack Brooks, music by Harry Warren, additional words and music by Jeff Alexander
+
SONGS
"All I Do Is Dream of You," words by Arthur Freed, music by Nacio Herb Brown
"I'm Through with Love," words by Gus Kahn, music by Matt Malneck and Fud Livingston
"You Wonderful You," words by Saul Chaplin and Jack Brooks, music by Harry Warren, additional words and music by Jeff Alexander
"Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms," words by Thomas Moore, music traditional
"You Can't Do Wrong Doin' Right," words and music by Al Rinker and Floyd Huddleston.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis
Release Date:
14 August 1953
Production Date:
26 January--early February 1953
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 May 1953
Copyright Number:
LP2630
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
72-74
Length(in feet):
6,530
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16408
SYNOPSIS

During freshman registration at Grainbelt University, where the school motto is "Learn, Learn, Learn--Work, Work, Work," new student Dobie Gillis cheerfully informs his advisor that he is more interested in enjoying himself than in studying. Dobie's easygoing philosophy impresses fellow freshman Charlie Trask, who proposes that they room together at the dormitory. That evening, at a dance, Dobie is attracted to pretty Pansy Hammer, while the flashy Lorna Ellingboe, whom Charlie likes, immediately falls for Dobie. The following day, Dobie sees Pansy registering for classes, and promptly asks her advisor to enroll him in the same courses. Lorna, still hot on Dobie's trail, instructs the advisor to sign her up for whatever he is studying, and Charlie asks to be enrolled in Lorna's classes. The term begins, and Dobie observes that Pansy's chemistry experiments tend to result in explosions. When Pansy decides to join the staff of the school magazine, her entourage of suitors accompanies her, and all are put to work selling subscriptions. As the semester goes on, Charlie complains about the unwelcome work that Dobie's infatuation with Pansy has meant for him and Lorna, and Dobie agrees to stop pretending he has scholarly interests. Before he can confess his true nature to Pansy, however, she tells him she wants to start having fun, and Mrs. Hammer gives Pansy permission to start dating Dobie, over the objections of Pansy's over-protective father. One night, while Pansy is helping Dobie fix his stalled car, a ribbon on her dress gets caught in the engine's gears, and her clothes are shredded off her body. When Pansy returns home wearing only her slip, Mr. ... +


During freshman registration at Grainbelt University, where the school motto is "Learn, Learn, Learn--Work, Work, Work," new student Dobie Gillis cheerfully informs his advisor that he is more interested in enjoying himself than in studying. Dobie's easygoing philosophy impresses fellow freshman Charlie Trask, who proposes that they room together at the dormitory. That evening, at a dance, Dobie is attracted to pretty Pansy Hammer, while the flashy Lorna Ellingboe, whom Charlie likes, immediately falls for Dobie. The following day, Dobie sees Pansy registering for classes, and promptly asks her advisor to enroll him in the same courses. Lorna, still hot on Dobie's trail, instructs the advisor to sign her up for whatever he is studying, and Charlie asks to be enrolled in Lorna's classes. The term begins, and Dobie observes that Pansy's chemistry experiments tend to result in explosions. When Pansy decides to join the staff of the school magazine, her entourage of suitors accompanies her, and all are put to work selling subscriptions. As the semester goes on, Charlie complains about the unwelcome work that Dobie's infatuation with Pansy has meant for him and Lorna, and Dobie agrees to stop pretending he has scholarly interests. Before he can confess his true nature to Pansy, however, she tells him she wants to start having fun, and Mrs. Hammer gives Pansy permission to start dating Dobie, over the objections of Pansy's over-protective father. One night, while Pansy is helping Dobie fix his stalled car, a ribbon on her dress gets caught in the engine's gears, and her clothes are shredded off her body. When Pansy returns home wearing only her slip, Mr. Hammer refuses to let her see Dobie anymore, so Dobie and Pansy decide to start cutting classes and go out in the daytime. Upon returning to class several weeks later, the young couple discovers that several big assignments are due. In desperation, Dobie copies his English essay for Professor Amos Pomfritt's class out of a library book. That night, Dobie and Pansy sneak into the lab to complete a chemistry project due the following morning, and when the exhausted Dobie falls asleep, Pansy begins experimenting on her own and blows up the lab. Mr. Hammer withdraws Pansy from school and sends her to live with her aunt in New York. The dean wants to expel Dobie, but Pomfritt, impressed by the essay he handed in, insists that the young man be allowed to stay. Dobie remains faithful to Pansy in her absence, and Lorna finally begins to appreciate Charlie's devotion. Pansy calls Dobie and urges him to visit her in New York, but he does not have the money, so he and his friends concoct a scheme to cash in on the used textbook market. After using Dobie's car to secure a loan from Smiling Latvian's car lot, the friends buy up all of the books for Pomfritt's class, planning to mark them up and resell them the following semester. However, Pomfritt, inspired by Dobie's literary genius, produces a new edition of his book, rendering the old version worthless. Meanwhile, Harry Dorcas, editor of the school magazine, informs Dobie, Charlie and Lorna that the publication is about to go under. Dobie suggests raising money by holding a dance, and volunteers to go to New York to recruit a well-known band for the event. Harry hands over the magazine's entire $1,000 bank balance, admonishing Dobie to be frugal. In New York, however, Dobie entertains Pansy lavishly, and is soon down to $600. Dobie goes to a booking agent, but his meager funds are only enough for him to hire Happy Stella Kowalski and Her Schottiche Five, a band of stout older women who specialize in playing Lithuanian weddings. Dobie returns to school and tries in vain to sell tickets to the dance. The night of the event, Mr. Hammer bursts in with the news that Pansy has disappeared. When Pansy shows up as a member of Happy Stella's group, her father calls the police, but Pansy declares that she and Dobie are in love and will not be separated. Mrs. Hammer sides with Pansy, and Mr. Hammer reluctantly agrees to let his daughter grow up. Just then, the police surround the building, bringing in the students in droves, and the dance is a success. With their problems behind them, the two young couples happily apply themselves to work and play. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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