Irene (1940)

101 mins | Musical comedy | 3 May 1940

Director:

Herbert Wilcox

Producer:

Herbert Wilcox

Cinematographer:

Russell Metty

Editor:

Elmo Williams

Production Designer:

L. P. Williams

Production Company:

Imperadio Pictures, Ltd.
Full page view
HISTORY

Marionettes of Anna Neagle and Ray Milland appear throughout the opening credits and briefly in the end credits after the stars names reappear. Although the names of Martha Tilton, Hattie Noel and The Dandridge Sisters are not in the opening or closing credits, they appear as written credits of the "Moviebone Newsreel," which is part of the musical revue that Irene attends. While most of the film was in black and white, the lengthy sequence of the night of the ball is in color, beginning with the opening shot of Neagle as "Irene O'Dare" in the "Alice Blue Gown" and ending the next day when a title card announces "The grey light of morning." Anthony Collins received an Academy Award nomination in the Music (Scoring) category.
       According to a news item in HR in Jun 1934, M-G-M was negotiating for the rights to the play at that time. A silent film based on James H. Montgomery's musical-comedy was produced by First National in 1926, starring Colleen Moore and directed by Alfred E. Green (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.2731). In 1936, Jeanette MacDonald starred in a Lux Radio Theater version of the ... More Less

Marionettes of Anna Neagle and Ray Milland appear throughout the opening credits and briefly in the end credits after the stars names reappear. Although the names of Martha Tilton, Hattie Noel and The Dandridge Sisters are not in the opening or closing credits, they appear as written credits of the "Moviebone Newsreel," which is part of the musical revue that Irene attends. While most of the film was in black and white, the lengthy sequence of the night of the ball is in color, beginning with the opening shot of Neagle as "Irene O'Dare" in the "Alice Blue Gown" and ending the next day when a title card announces "The grey light of morning." Anthony Collins received an Academy Award nomination in the Music (Scoring) category.
       According to a news item in HR in Jun 1934, M-G-M was negotiating for the rights to the play at that time. A silent film based on James H. Montgomery's musical-comedy was produced by First National in 1926, starring Colleen Moore and directed by Alfred E. Green (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.2731). In 1936, Jeanette MacDonald starred in a Lux Radio Theater version of the play. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Apr 40
p. 3.
Film Daily
19 Apr 40
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 34
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Nov 39
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Dec 39
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Apr 40
p. 2.
Motion Picture Daily
23 Apr 40
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
3 Feb 40
p. 37.
Motion Picture Herald
20 Apr 40
p. 30.
New York Times
24 May 40
p. 23.
Variety
24 Apr 40
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
Orch arr
Orch arr
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Choreog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the musical Irene, book by James H. Montgomery, music and lyrics by Harry Tierney and Joseph McCarthy (New York, 1 Nov 1919).
SONGS
"Alice Blue Gown," "Castle of Dreams," "Irene," "You've Got Me Out on a Limb," "Worthy of You," "Something in the Air" and "Sweet Vermosa Brown," words and music by Harry Tierney and Joseph McCarthy.
DETAILS
Release Date:
3 May 1940
Premiere Information:
Portland, OR, premiere: 23 April 1940
Production Date:
began late November 1939
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
3 May 1940
Copyright Number:
LP9952
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black & white with color sequences
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
101
Length(in reels):
13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
5931
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Irene O'Dare, an upholsterer's assistant, meets wealthy Don Marshall while she is measuring chairs at the Herman Vincent estate in Long Island. Don becomes enchanted by Irene, and decides to promote her career by anonymously buying Madame Lucy's, an exclusive Manhattan dress shop, thus insuring her a job as a model. Don installs Mr. Smith as the manager of the shop, and soon Irene is selling dresses to Mrs. Herman Vincent and other socialites. Her success earns the enmity of the other models while also renewing the attentions of Bob Vincent, scion of the wealthy Vincent family. In order to promote the shop's dress line, Mr. Smith arranges for his models to be invited to a society ball held at the Vincent estate. At the ball, Irene causes a stir when she is mistaken for Irish nobility, thus giving Mr. Smith an idea for further publicizing his collection. Exploiting Irene's mistaken identity, Mr. Smith installs her in a Park Avenue apartment and supplies her with diamonds and furs as she is escorted around town by Bob. After gossip columnist 'Biffy' Webster gets a tip about Irene from an envious model, he prints a snide innuendo about how her expensive apartment and clothes are being paid. Incensed, Irene goes to confront Madame Lucy and learns that Don is the real owner of the shop. Feeling angry and betrayed, Irene consents to marry Bob, but on the eve of their wedding, a disconsolate Bob realizes that he loves his former sweetheart, Eleanor Worth, while Irene realizes that she loves Don. All ends happily as the couples realign ... +


Irene O'Dare, an upholsterer's assistant, meets wealthy Don Marshall while she is measuring chairs at the Herman Vincent estate in Long Island. Don becomes enchanted by Irene, and decides to promote her career by anonymously buying Madame Lucy's, an exclusive Manhattan dress shop, thus insuring her a job as a model. Don installs Mr. Smith as the manager of the shop, and soon Irene is selling dresses to Mrs. Herman Vincent and other socialites. Her success earns the enmity of the other models while also renewing the attentions of Bob Vincent, scion of the wealthy Vincent family. In order to promote the shop's dress line, Mr. Smith arranges for his models to be invited to a society ball held at the Vincent estate. At the ball, Irene causes a stir when she is mistaken for Irish nobility, thus giving Mr. Smith an idea for further publicizing his collection. Exploiting Irene's mistaken identity, Mr. Smith installs her in a Park Avenue apartment and supplies her with diamonds and furs as she is escorted around town by Bob. After gossip columnist 'Biffy' Webster gets a tip about Irene from an envious model, he prints a snide innuendo about how her expensive apartment and clothes are being paid. Incensed, Irene goes to confront Madame Lucy and learns that Don is the real owner of the shop. Feeling angry and betrayed, Irene consents to marry Bob, but on the eve of their wedding, a disconsolate Bob realizes that he loves his former sweetheart, Eleanor Worth, while Irene realizes that she loves Don. All ends happily as the couples realign themselves. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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