Confidentially Connie (1953)

71-72 mins | Comedy | 13 March 1953

Director:

Edward Buzzell

Writer:

Max Shulman

Producer:

Stephen Ames

Cinematographer:

Harold Lipstein

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Leonid Vasian

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were A Steak for Connie and Connie. The order of names in the opening cast credits differs slightly from the order of the end credits. According to HR news items, Jeff Alexander was originally signed to compose the musical score, but was replaced by David Rose because of conflicts Alexander had with other M-G-M assignments.
       A 19 Mar 1953 article in DV reports that the Meat Association of America protested the film, claiming that it held butchers and their organizations up to ridicule. Calling Confidentially Connie an "attack" on the meat industry, the Institute asked M-G-M to withdraw the film from distribution and ordered one of its members to cancel a promotional tie-in with a local theater. ...

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The working titles of this film were A Steak for Connie and Connie. The order of names in the opening cast credits differs slightly from the order of the end credits. According to HR news items, Jeff Alexander was originally signed to compose the musical score, but was replaced by David Rose because of conflicts Alexander had with other M-G-M assignments.
       A 19 Mar 1953 article in DV reports that the Meat Association of America protested the film, claiming that it held butchers and their organizations up to ridicule. Calling Confidentially Connie an "attack" on the meat industry, the Institute asked M-G-M to withdraw the film from distribution and ordered one of its members to cancel a promotional tie-in with a local theater.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 Jan 1953
---
Daily Variety
16 Jan 1953
pp. 3-4
Daily Variety
19 Mar 1953
p. 1, 6
Film Daily
29 Jan 1953
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 1952
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1952
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1952
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 1952
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
20 Aug 1952
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
29 Dec 1952
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jan 1953
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
17 Jan 1953
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Jan 1953
p. 1686
Variety
21 Jan 1953
p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
From a story by
From a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Fredrick Y. Smith
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Ralph Hurst
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Montage seq
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Dick Kinon
Scr supv
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Oh, My Darling Clementine" by Percy Montrose; "Home on the Range" by Dr. Brewster M. Higley.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
A Steak for Connie
Connie
Release Date:
13 March 1953
Production Date:
mid Jul--early Aug 1952
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Loew's Inc.
15 January 1953
LP2295
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71-72
Length(in feet):
6,413
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16095
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When pregnant Connie Bedloe's obstetrician recommends a diet rich in red meat, she sadly replies that her husband's modest salary as a college instructor makes this impossible. While walking home with her friend, Phyllis Archibald, however, Connie is seized by a powerful craving for red meat, and goes into the butcher shop to spend her cigarette allowance on lamb chops. Meanwhile, at Maine's tiny Mather College, Dean Edward E. Magruder tells his staff that poetry teacher Joe Bedloe is one of two candidates for an assistant professorship. That evening, when Joe learns that Connie gave up smoking to buy the lamb chops, he reproaches himself for being a poor provider and says he should quit teaching and go back to work for his estranged father Opie, a cattle rancher in Texas. Connie reassures her husband, but advises him to pursue the promotion more aggressively, pointing out that his rival, the obsequious Simmons, is having a dinner party for Dean Magruder. Meanwhile, at Opie's Texas cattle ranch, where the dinner table is piled high with meat, the gruff old man decides to pay a surprise visit to his son. Connie warmly greets her father-in-law, whom she has never met, and confides that she would like Joe to return to the ranch. Joe refuses to give up the job he loves, however, and tries to convince his father of the importance of teachers. That evening, after their fish dinner, Connie takes the vitamins her doctor prescribed and tells Opie about the baby, and he is appalled by her frugal diet. Visions of fish and vitamins torment Opie's dreams that night, and he wakes in a ...

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When pregnant Connie Bedloe's obstetrician recommends a diet rich in red meat, she sadly replies that her husband's modest salary as a college instructor makes this impossible. While walking home with her friend, Phyllis Archibald, however, Connie is seized by a powerful craving for red meat, and goes into the butcher shop to spend her cigarette allowance on lamb chops. Meanwhile, at Maine's tiny Mather College, Dean Edward E. Magruder tells his staff that poetry teacher Joe Bedloe is one of two candidates for an assistant professorship. That evening, when Joe learns that Connie gave up smoking to buy the lamb chops, he reproaches himself for being a poor provider and says he should quit teaching and go back to work for his estranged father Opie, a cattle rancher in Texas. Connie reassures her husband, but advises him to pursue the promotion more aggressively, pointing out that his rival, the obsequious Simmons, is having a dinner party for Dean Magruder. Meanwhile, at Opie's Texas cattle ranch, where the dinner table is piled high with meat, the gruff old man decides to pay a surprise visit to his son. Connie warmly greets her father-in-law, whom she has never met, and confides that she would like Joe to return to the ranch. Joe refuses to give up the job he loves, however, and tries to convince his father of the importance of teachers. That evening, after their fish dinner, Connie takes the vitamins her doctor prescribed and tells Opie about the baby, and he is appalled by her frugal diet. Visions of fish and vitamins torment Opie's dreams that night, and he wakes in a panic, declaring that Connie must have meat. Opie calls on butcher Emil Spangenberg and enlists his help in a scheme: Opie will tell Connie and Joe that Spangenberg is getting his meat cheap from an overstocked slaughterhouse and is passing the savings on to his customers. Pulling out a hefty bankroll, Opie instructs the butcher to charge Connie half price from now on. When Opie comes home with an enormous sirloin steak, Connie immediately sees through his ruse, but gratefully accepts the meat. Connie throws a dinner party for the dean, who is greatly impressed by the steak. Opie realizes that his son will never come home if he gets the promotion, so he privately tells Dean Magruder that Joe will be returning to Texas at the end of the term. As the guests are leaving, Joe innocently shares the news about Spangenberg's new low prices, and the wives excitedly make plans to stock up on meat the following morning. Opie tracks Spangenberg down at a butchers' convention, and promises to cover his losses if he will keep up the façade until all three women from the dinner party have bought their meat. Word of Spangenberg's discounts gets out, however, starting a price war among the local butchers and driving the entire town into a meat-buying frenzy. Later that day, Joe learns that Simmons got the promotion, and reluctantly agrees to return to the ranch. Just then, a distraught Spangenberg bursts in, telling Opie that the other butchers are blaming him for their losses in the price war. Joe is furious at Opie's meddling, but Connie takes her father-in-law's side. Later, Joe's students come by to give him a going-away present, and when they mention Opie's conversation with the dean, Connie is as angry as Joe. While Opie is packing his bags, Dean Magruder holds a meeting to announce that the college has received an anonymous endowment to be used to raise each teacher's salary by $1,000. Joe goes to the train station and tells his father that he does not want his money, but Opie insists that he set up the endowment for the other professors after seeing their joy at being able to afford meat. That summer, Joe and Connie bring their baby son Opie to visit his grandfather on the ranch.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.