The Black Glove (1954)

84 mins | Mystery | 29 January 1954

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HISTORY

This film was released in Britain as Face the Music. ...

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This film was released in Britain as Face the Music.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
20 Feb 1954
p. 2190
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Hammer Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus dir
Trumpet theme and spec arr
SOUND
Sd rec
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
STAND INS
Trumpet stand-in for Alex Nichols
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Face the Music by Ernest Borneman (publication undetermined).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
MUSIC
"My Melancholy Baby" by Ernie Burnett; "Just a Gigolo" by Leonello Casucci; "The Three-cornered Hat" by Manuel de Falla.
SONGS
"Nobody Knows de Trouble I've Seen," traditional; "Got You on My Mind" and "I Got a Man in New Orleans," composers undetermined.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Face the Music
Release Date:
29 January 1954
Production Date:
began late Jun 1953 at Bray Studios, Windsor, England
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Exclusive Films, Ltd.
28 December 1953
LP3509
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
84
Length(in feet):
7586
Length(in reels):
9
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Jim “Brad” Bradley, an American trumpet soloist, is appearing with a locally engaged band at the London Palladium, Britain’s foremost vaudeville theater. On the drive back to his hotel, Brad hears a female singer’s voice coming from a closed nightclub and decides to join in a jam session with the singer, Maxine Halbard, and her musicians. Afterward, Maxine invites Brad to her apartment for a meal, and after a pleasant evening, he invites her out to dinner the following night. Maxine agrees, but warns him that she has a Canadian boy friend she is going to marry. As Brad departs, he absentmindedly leaves his trumpet behind and a shadowy figure approaches Maxine’s door. Early the next morning, Brad is awakened by police officers MacKenzie and Mulrooney who inform him that Maxine has been murdered and that he is a prime suspect. In addition to Brad’s trumpet, the police have also found a privately recorded phonograph record of Maxine singing, accompanied by pianist Jeff Colt, who is also a suspect. Later, Colt phones Brad and tells him that he is sending him a copy of the record. Meanwhile, Brad locates Maxine’s sister, Barbara Quigley, who is also a singer, at a rough club in Soho. Barbara is in love with her pianist Johnny Sutherland, but he was romantically involved with Maxine. Later, Brad listens to Colt’s record and invites him to his hotel for a drink. When Brad asks Colt to reproduce a passage he played on the record, he cannot. Colt then asks Brad to tell this to the police as he claims he never worked with Maxine and that another pianist was playing on the record. Although Brad’s ...

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Jim “Brad” Bradley, an American trumpet soloist, is appearing with a locally engaged band at the London Palladium, Britain’s foremost vaudeville theater. On the drive back to his hotel, Brad hears a female singer’s voice coming from a closed nightclub and decides to join in a jam session with the singer, Maxine Halbard, and her musicians. Afterward, Maxine invites Brad to her apartment for a meal, and after a pleasant evening, he invites her out to dinner the following night. Maxine agrees, but warns him that she has a Canadian boy friend she is going to marry. As Brad departs, he absentmindedly leaves his trumpet behind and a shadowy figure approaches Maxine’s door. Early the next morning, Brad is awakened by police officers MacKenzie and Mulrooney who inform him that Maxine has been murdered and that he is a prime suspect. In addition to Brad’s trumpet, the police have also found a privately recorded phonograph record of Maxine singing, accompanied by pianist Jeff Colt, who is also a suspect. Later, Colt phones Brad and tells him that he is sending him a copy of the record. Meanwhile, Brad locates Maxine’s sister, Barbara Quigley, who is also a singer, at a rough club in Soho. Barbara is in love with her pianist Johnny Sutherland, but he was romantically involved with Maxine. Later, Brad listens to Colt’s record and invites him to his hotel for a drink. When Brad asks Colt to reproduce a passage he played on the record, he cannot. Colt then asks Brad to tell this to the police as he claims he never worked with Maxine and that another pianist was playing on the record. Although Brad’s manager, Max Margulis, informs him that he has lined up several engagements and recording sessions for him, Brad misses them to search for Johnny, who also has a copy of the disc. Johnny explains to Brad that the record was produced by Maurie Green, the owner of a company specializing in audition discs. Brad then goes to see Green, pretending to be interested in recording some practice discs. When Brad casually asks if Maxine and Colt ever recorded in his studio, Green says no. Later, as Barbara prepares coffee at her apartment, Brad looks through her photograph album and finds a photo of Barbara, Maxine and Colt’s wife Gloria billed as a singing “sisters” act. Barbara then explains that after the act broke up, she appeared with Johnny as his target in a trick-shot circus act. Realizing that Maxine took Johnny away from Barbara, Brad begins to suspect that Barbara may have killed her sister. Brad then gets Johnny to admit that he made the recording, imitating Colt’s style. Later, Brad saves Barbara from an intruder who has entered the apartment to remove a photo from her album. After further investigations, including a visit to a mental hospital, Brad phones police inspector MacKenzie to say that he knows who killed Maxine. The inspector orders all involved in the case to assemble at Brad’s dressing room at the Palladium. While rehearsing, Brad passes out and, when he recovers, a doctor informs him that the trumpet’s mouthpiece had been poisoned. By this time, all the principals in the case, as well as the police, have arrived and Brad reviews the events of the night of the murder. During his investigations, Brad discovered a photograph of Maxine and Green on the grounds of a mental hospital. Upon visiting the hospital, Brad discovered that Green had suffered a mental breakdown and that his medical file described him as a dangerous paranoiac. Brad continues that after Maxine had rejected Green’s romantic advances, he was pushed over the edge. When Brad accuses Green of the murder, Green pulls out a gun and attempts to shoot Brad, but Max jumps in front of Brad and is shot in the arm. The police then overpower Green and take him away. Later, Brad resumes his performances at the Palladium as Barbara and Johnny, now romantically involved, watch from the wings.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.