Gypsy Colt (1954)

71-72 mins | Drama | 2 April 1954

Director:

Andrew Marton

Writer:

Martin Berkeley

Cinematographer:

Harold Lipstein

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Malcolm Brown

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The horse Gypsy is listed in the film's opening credits but not the closing credits. According to a 22 Jun 1953 HR news item, Gig Young was originally cast as "Wade Y. Gerald." A HR news item reports that the film was shot on location in Aspen and Grand Junction, CO and the Mojave Desert, Rosemead Dry Lake and Red Rock Canyon, CA. Gypsy Colt was based on the same source as the 1943 M-G-M film Lassie Come Home , which was directed by Fred M. Wilcox and starred Roddy McDowell as a little boy separated from his beloved dog (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50 ... More Less

The horse Gypsy is listed in the film's opening credits but not the closing credits. According to a 22 Jun 1953 HR news item, Gig Young was originally cast as "Wade Y. Gerald." A HR news item reports that the film was shot on location in Aspen and Grand Junction, CO and the Mojave Desert, Rosemead Dry Lake and Red Rock Canyon, CA. Gypsy Colt was based on the same source as the 1943 M-G-M film Lassie Come Home , which was directed by Fred M. Wilcox and starred Roddy McDowell as a little boy separated from his beloved dog (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50 ). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
30 Jan 1954.
---
Daily Variety
27 Jan 54
p. 3.
Film Daily
8 Feb 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 53
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 53
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jul 53
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jul 1953
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jul 53
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 54
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
30 Jan 54
p. 2165.
Variety
27 Jan 54
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec supv
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Scr supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Lassie Come Home by Eric Knight (Chicago, 1940).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 April 1954
Production Date:
7 July--late July 1953
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 January 1954
Copyright Number:
LP3871
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Ansco Color
Lenses/Prints
print by Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
71-72
Length(in feet):
6,447
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16702
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Every day at three o'clock, a glossy black colt named Gypsy arrives at the schoolhouse to greet his mistress, young Meg MacWade. One day, Meg's parents, Frank and Em, try in vain to find the courage to tell their daughter that Gypsy must be sold, as the long drought has left them with barely enough water to survive on their small farm. The following morning, stable owner Wade Y. Gerald buys Gypsy, then hands the animal over to his brash trainer, Hank, to turn him into a race horse. When Gypsy is not there to meet her after school, Meg runs home in fear and confronts her parents. Frank is too upset to speak, but Em sadly explains to Meg that they acted out of necessity. Wade shows Gypsy to his young son Phil, who is concerned that the horse is listless and off his feed. Gypsy is released into the corral, where he promptly jumps the fence and runs away to meet Meg at school. Shortly after Meg and Gypsy get home, Hank arrives to take the horse back, and when he uses the whip on Gypsy, Frank angrily knocks him down, then gently leads Gypsy into the carrier. Gypsy's training continues, and the horse shows impressive speed. One day, Gypsy again breaks free and runs away. Hank goes to the MacWade home, and Frank and Em say that Meg has not come home from school. Frank finds Meg and Gypsy hiding in a cave, and comforts his daughter. In the morning, Frank and Meg return Gypsy to the Gerald ranch, and Wade is surprised to learn that the horse has run away twice. After Meg bids Gypsy ... +


Every day at three o'clock, a glossy black colt named Gypsy arrives at the schoolhouse to greet his mistress, young Meg MacWade. One day, Meg's parents, Frank and Em, try in vain to find the courage to tell their daughter that Gypsy must be sold, as the long drought has left them with barely enough water to survive on their small farm. The following morning, stable owner Wade Y. Gerald buys Gypsy, then hands the animal over to his brash trainer, Hank, to turn him into a race horse. When Gypsy is not there to meet her after school, Meg runs home in fear and confronts her parents. Frank is too upset to speak, but Em sadly explains to Meg that they acted out of necessity. Wade shows Gypsy to his young son Phil, who is concerned that the horse is listless and off his feed. Gypsy is released into the corral, where he promptly jumps the fence and runs away to meet Meg at school. Shortly after Meg and Gypsy get home, Hank arrives to take the horse back, and when he uses the whip on Gypsy, Frank angrily knocks him down, then gently leads Gypsy into the carrier. Gypsy's training continues, and the horse shows impressive speed. One day, Gypsy again breaks free and runs away. Hank goes to the MacWade home, and Frank and Em say that Meg has not come home from school. Frank finds Meg and Gypsy hiding in a cave, and comforts his daughter. In the morning, Frank and Meg return Gypsy to the Gerald ranch, and Wade is surprised to learn that the horse has run away twice. After Meg bids Gypsy a tearful goodbye, she meets Phil, who promises to take care of the horse for her. Gypsy is taken to Greenway Park for the thoroughbred racing meet. When Hank's back is turned, Gypsy releases the latch on his stall and escapes, then begins the 500-mile trek back to the MacWade farm. Along the way, Gypsy is roped by some cowboys, but rears up and escapes when they try to brand him. The cowboys pursue him to the edge of a canyon, but Gypsy jumps into the lake below and swims to the other side. Later, Gypsy runs by a small roadside diner, and the waitress shows her customers a newspaper article about the runaway horse. When they learn there is a $1,000 reward for the animal, four young men pursue Gypsy on their motorcycles, but the spirited horse eludes them. Gypsy continues his journey over the parched land, but thirst and exhaustion finally overtake him. The unconscious Gypsy is discovered by a young boy, Pedro, who is riding by on a burro. The boy gives Gypsy water, and when that fails to revive the horse, he goes to get his father Tony. Gypsy is gone when they return, but Tony and Pedro follow his tracks and bring the horse back to their small farm. Despite Pedro's affection for him, Gypsy is restless. One day, Tony brings two men over to buy the horse, and Pedro is crushed. That night, while the men are drinking and playing music, Pedro--alarmed by the whip that one of the men is carrying--releases Gypsy. Back on the farm, Frank tells Em that they should give up and look for work up north until the drought ends. Just then, they hear whinnying and rush outside to find a bedraggled Gypsy looking in Meg's window. They are tending to the animal when Wade, Phil and Hank drive up. In desperation, Frank and Em claim that the horse is just an old nag they bought to keep Meg company. Realizing what Gypsy has done to return to the little girl he loves, Wade and Phil pretend not to recognize the horse. Hank protests, but Wade fires him for his callous treatment of the horses under his care. At three o'clock, Gypsy grows excited, and Frank releases him. The horse gallops through town to the schoolhouse, and as Meg happily embraces Gypsy, it begins to rain. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.