So This Is Paris (1955)

96 mins | Romance, Musical | January 1955

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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were So This Is Paree and Three Gobs in Paris . So This Is Paris marked Tony Curtis' only performance singing in a musical. Although Apr 1954 HR production charts name Ted Kent as the film's editor, Virgil Vogel receives sole editor credit onscreen. An Apr 1953 HR news item adds Linda Danson to the cast as a dancer, but her appearance in the final film has not been ... More Less

The working titles of this film were So This Is Paree and Three Gobs in Paris . So This Is Paris marked Tony Curtis' only performance singing in a musical. Although Apr 1954 HR production charts name Ted Kent as the film's editor, Virgil Vogel receives sole editor credit onscreen. An Apr 1953 HR news item adds Linda Danson to the cast as a dancer, but her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
20 Nov 1954.
---
Daily Variety
16 Nov 54
p. 3.
Film Daily
19 Nov 54
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 54
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 54
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Apr 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 54
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
20 Nov 54
p. 217.
New York Times
12 Feb 55
p. 11.
Variety
17 Nov 54
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Props
COSTUMES
MUSIC
DANCE
Choreog
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Can't Give You Anything but Love, Baby," words by Dorothy Fields, French words by Tanis Chandler, music by Jimmy McHugh
"Wait 'Til Paris Sees Us," "Looking for Someone to Love," "The Two of Us," "If You Were There," "It's Really Up to You," "A Dame's a Dame," "Three Bon Vivants," "I Can't Do a Single" and "So This Is Paris," words and music by Pony Sherrell and Phil Moody.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
So This Is Paree
Three Gobs in Paris
Release Date:
January 1955
Production Date:
late Mar--mid May 1954
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., Inc.
Copyright Date:
25 September 1954
Copyright Number:
LP4111
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1 or 2:1
Duration(in mins):
96
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

United States Navy sailors Joe Maxwell, Al Howard and Davey Jones land in Le Havre, France, and are granted leave in Paris. Joe, a notorious ladies' man, insists that they ride a taxi to beat the other sailors to the city, but after their shenanigans cause the car to break down, the trio hops on a bus. During their first night in Paris, Joe leads Al and Davey to a nightclub where Colette D'Avril sings. Although all three are enamored of the lovely chanteuse, only Joe has the courage to approach her, and his persistence wins him a dance with Colette. After Joe signals to his pals to leave him alone, Davey meets a pretty cashier named Yvonne, while Al wanders into the streets of the city. Joe walks Colette home, and when her Parisian accent disappears, he discovers that she is Brooklyn-born Janie Mitchell, who came to Paris after failing to find stardom on Broadway. Janie's beauty quickly alleviates Joe's disappointment at this news, but he is again distressed when she will not allow him past her front door. While Joe returns to the hotel, Al flirts with women on the street, failing at every attempt until he climbs a balcony into a showgirl's apartment. When she pushes him out the window, he falls onto a thief who has stolen the purse of socialite Suzanne Sorel. A tipsy Suzanne instructs her escort, Pierre Deshons, to drive them to Al's hotel, kissing Al gratefully all the way there. The next morning, little Jeannine delivers a note from Janie to the hotel, inviting the sailors to breakfast at her house. There, Joe is dismayed when Janie introduces him to her ... +


United States Navy sailors Joe Maxwell, Al Howard and Davey Jones land in Le Havre, France, and are granted leave in Paris. Joe, a notorious ladies' man, insists that they ride a taxi to beat the other sailors to the city, but after their shenanigans cause the car to break down, the trio hops on a bus. During their first night in Paris, Joe leads Al and Davey to a nightclub where Colette D'Avril sings. Although all three are enamored of the lovely chanteuse, only Joe has the courage to approach her, and his persistence wins him a dance with Colette. After Joe signals to his pals to leave him alone, Davey meets a pretty cashier named Yvonne, while Al wanders into the streets of the city. Joe walks Colette home, and when her Parisian accent disappears, he discovers that she is Brooklyn-born Janie Mitchell, who came to Paris after failing to find stardom on Broadway. Janie's beauty quickly alleviates Joe's disappointment at this news, but he is again distressed when she will not allow him past her front door. While Joe returns to the hotel, Al flirts with women on the street, failing at every attempt until he climbs a balcony into a showgirl's apartment. When she pushes him out the window, he falls onto a thief who has stolen the purse of socialite Suzanne Sorel. A tipsy Suzanne instructs her escort, Pierre Deshons, to drive them to Al's hotel, kissing Al gratefully all the way there. The next morning, little Jeannine delivers a note from Janie to the hotel, inviting the sailors to breakfast at her house. There, Joe is dismayed when Janie introduces him to her "family," which consists of Grand'mere Marie and five small children, until Janie explains that the kids are orphans whose care is paid for by a rich American benefactor. Janie watches with pleasure as Joe, Al and Davey entertain the children, and Joe later secures a date with her for that evening. When the men return to their hotel, they are thrilled to find an invitation to Suzanne's mansion, and, once there, are even more delighted to meet Suzanne's friends, Ingrid, Carmen and Christiane. Fickle Suzanne immediately transfers her attention to Joe and asks him to take her out that evening, and although Al is hurt, he agrees to help Joe break his date with Janie. That night, he relates Joe's excuse, involving a long-lost aunt, to Janie, but she quickly recognizes it as a lie and asks Al to walk her home. The next morning, Joe furiously assumes that Al is trying to steal Janie's affections, but after Al informs him that Janie loves him, Joe races to her house with flowers. She initially spurns him, but Joe eventually charms her into kissing him. They are interrupted, however, by a letter announcing that the orphans' benefactor has died, and later Joe secretly plots with Al and Davey to raise money to support the children. While Al loses his payroll in a crooked dice game and Davey allows Yvonne to beguile him out of his cash, Joe attempts to borrow from Suzanne, who can only promise to ask her father for money when he returns from his trip abroad. When she then kisses Joe in front of newspaper cameras, the photograph runs on the front page the next day, identifying Joe as her fiancé. With only one day of leave remaining, Joe, who cannot convince Janie that the kiss was innocent, feigns indifference. On the street, Joe sees an organ grinder and is inspired to host a charity bazaar for the kids. Knowing that Suzanne has left town to join her father, Joe convinces her butler that he is throwing a surprise party for her at her home. Using Mr. Sorel's name as credit, the sailors quickly arrange a lavish affair and invite all of Suzanne's friends, and the party proves a huge success. Just as they are about reach their monetary goal, however, Pierre arrives and, assuming the charity event is a ruse, races to inform Mr. Sorel, who has unexpectedly returned to the city with Suzanne. As Davey struggles to entertain the crowd, Al collects Janie and the kids and brings them to the party as proof of the sailors' good intentions. Mr. Sorel is about to have Joe arrested when the children arrive, and, instantly charmed by them, drops all charges against Joe. Hearing that the sailors have only an hour to return to their ship, Mr. Sorel arranges a police escort. At the dock, Davey embraces Yvonne, while Al shocks Suzanne with a passionate kiss, and Joe promises Janie that he will return to her in the fall. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.