New Frontier (1939)

56-57 mins | Western | 10 August 1939

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HISTORY

The film's working title was Raiders of the Wasteland, and the print viewed was titled Frontier Horizon. The picture marked the motion picture debut of actress Jennifer Jones (1919--2009), who was billed onscreen as Phylis Isley. Modern sources list the following additional cast members: Curley Dresden, Jody Gilbert, Cactus Mack, George Chesebro, Robert Burns, Bob Reeves, Frank Ellis, Walt LaRue , Oscar Gahan, Charles Murphy, Herman Hack, George Plues, Wilbur Mack and Bill Wolfe. For additional information on the series, consult the Series Index and See Entry for The Three Mesquiteers. ...

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The film's working title was Raiders of the Wasteland, and the print viewed was titled Frontier Horizon. The picture marked the motion picture debut of actress Jennifer Jones (1919--2009), who was billed onscreen as Phylis Isley. Modern sources list the following additional cast members: Curley Dresden, Jody Gilbert, Cactus Mack, George Chesebro, Robert Burns, Bob Reeves, Frank Ellis, Walt LaRue , Oscar Gahan, Charles Murphy, Herman Hack, George Plues, Wilbur Mack and Bill Wolfe. For additional information on the series, consult the Series Index and See Entry for The Three Mesquiteers.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
7 Sep 1939
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jun 1939
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jun 1939
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jul 1939
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 1939
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
9 Oct 1939
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
19 Aug 1939
p. 51
Variety
16 Aug 1939
p. 16
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus score
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by William Colt McDonald.
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Frontier Horizon
Raiders of the Wasteland
Release Date:
10 August 1939
Production Date:
26 Jun--early Jul 1939
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Republic Pictures Corp.
10 August 1939
LP9054
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA "High Fidelity" Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
56-57
Length(in feet):
4,946
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
5520
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

After the Civil War, Major Steven Braddock and his wife Lucy move West with other settlers to begin a new life. Braddock founds the community of New Hope Valley, and fifty years later, the peaceful and prosperous inhabitants celebrate the town's anniversary. Their jubilee is interrupted, however, when assemblyman William Proctor announces that New Hope Valley has been condemned and a dam will be built in the area to supply water to neighboring Metropole. M. C. Gilbert of the Metropole Construction Co. assures the outraged citizens that the state will pay them full value for their land, but they decide to take the matter to court. Judge Morse upholds the state's decision, however, by ruling that the dam will result in the greatest good for the greatest number. The townsfolk bitterly tear up the checks the state sent them for their land and vow to fight for their rights. Gilbert puts engineer Harmon in charge of construction and orders him to get his men working immediately. As the workers arrive, Braddock leads his fellow ranchers to meet them. Braddock's granddaughter Celia rushes to the ranch of Stony Brooke, Tucson Smith and Rusty Joslin, The Three Mesquiteers, and begs them to prevent the impending violence. The Mesquiteers reach the standoff as the construction workers, angered by the ranchers' warning gunfire, send a burning fuel tank hurtling into their midst. A huge brawl ensues, during which the Mesquiteers are arrested for fighting with Harmon, who ordered the fiery assault. While the Mesquiteers are in jail, Gilbert and Proctor scheme to entangle them and the others in Proctor's real estate scam. ...

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After the Civil War, Major Steven Braddock and his wife Lucy move West with other settlers to begin a new life. Braddock founds the community of New Hope Valley, and fifty years later, the peaceful and prosperous inhabitants celebrate the town's anniversary. Their jubilee is interrupted, however, when assemblyman William Proctor announces that New Hope Valley has been condemned and a dam will be built in the area to supply water to neighboring Metropole. M. C. Gilbert of the Metropole Construction Co. assures the outraged citizens that the state will pay them full value for their land, but they decide to take the matter to court. Judge Morse upholds the state's decision, however, by ruling that the dam will result in the greatest good for the greatest number. The townsfolk bitterly tear up the checks the state sent them for their land and vow to fight for their rights. Gilbert puts engineer Harmon in charge of construction and orders him to get his men working immediately. As the workers arrive, Braddock leads his fellow ranchers to meet them. Braddock's granddaughter Celia rushes to the ranch of Stony Brooke, Tucson Smith and Rusty Joslin, The Three Mesquiteers, and begs them to prevent the impending violence. The Mesquiteers reach the standoff as the construction workers, angered by the ranchers' warning gunfire, send a burning fuel tank hurtling into their midst. A huge brawl ensues, during which the Mesquiteers are arrested for fighting with Harmon, who ordered the fiery assault. While the Mesquiteers are in jail, Gilbert and Proctor scheme to entangle them and the others in Proctor's real estate scam. Proctor and Gilbert convince the Mesquiteers that the citizens of New Hope Valley will be better off in nearby Devil's Acres once the arid land is irrigated with water from the new dam. The Mesquiteers are enthusiastic about the idea and convince their friends to buy land in the planned development. Construction on the dam commences, with the stipulation that the valley denizens will not relocate until the water pipeline to Devil's Acres is completed. Soon the dam is finished and the Mesquiteers journey to their new home. The pipeline is not working, however, and the Mesquiteers realize the relocation was a trick to keep them quiet until Gilbert finished the dam and could drive them out. The trio race back to alert the others but are captured by Gilbert's men. Just as all the other citizens are beginning to leave and Gilbert starts to let water in to flood the valley, the Mesquiteers escape and warn their friends. A fight ensues between the ranchers and the workers, during which Gilbert is drowned in the raging water, but soon the water is stopped and the wrongdoers are captured. It is then not long before Devil's Acres is reclaimed, and the Mesquiteers help their friends settle into their new homes.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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