Dial Red O (1955)

62-63 mins | Drama | 13 March 1955

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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Code 3 and Dial 116 . The opening credits are superimposed over a shot of a page from a Los Angeles phone book, with instructions to "Dial Red O" in order to make an emergency call. Daniel B. Ullman's onscreen credit reads: "Written and Directed by Daniel B. Ullman." Sam Peckinpah (1925--1984) who worked as the picture's dialogue director, also had a small role in the film, playing a cook. Dial Red O was the director-screenwriter's first feature film acting role. He appeared onscreen periodically thoughout his career, either as Sam or David or David Samuel Peckinpah.
       Dial Red O was the first of a series of five films starring Bill Elliott as a police lieutenant. Although Elliott's character was called "Lt. Andy Flynn" in the first film, he was called "Lt. Andy Doyle" in the subsequent pictures. Several of the films featured Don Haggerty as Doyle's partner, "Sgt. Mike Duncan." Four of the five films were produced by Ben Schwalb, and all of the pictures were produced and released by Allied Artists. The last of the "Lt. Andy Doyle" pictures, Footsteps in the Night , was released in Mar ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Code 3 and Dial 116 . The opening credits are superimposed over a shot of a page from a Los Angeles phone book, with instructions to "Dial Red O" in order to make an emergency call. Daniel B. Ullman's onscreen credit reads: "Written and Directed by Daniel B. Ullman." Sam Peckinpah (1925--1984) who worked as the picture's dialogue director, also had a small role in the film, playing a cook. Dial Red O was the director-screenwriter's first feature film acting role. He appeared onscreen periodically thoughout his career, either as Sam or David or David Samuel Peckinpah.
       Dial Red O was the first of a series of five films starring Bill Elliott as a police lieutenant. Although Elliott's character was called "Lt. Andy Flynn" in the first film, he was called "Lt. Andy Doyle" in the subsequent pictures. Several of the films featured Don Haggerty as Doyle's partner, "Sgt. Mike Duncan." Four of the five films were produced by Ben Schwalb, and all of the pictures were produced and released by Allied Artists. The last of the "Lt. Andy Doyle" pictures, Footsteps in the Night , was released in Mar 1957. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Apr 1955.
---
Daily Variety
31 Jan 1955.
---
Daily Variety
11 Apr 55
p. 3.
Film Daily
14 Apr 55
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 1954
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 1954
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 1954
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Nov 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 1954
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Dec 1954
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Apr 55
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Apr 55
p. 403.
Variety
13 Apr 55
p. 9.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Props
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Jazz seq
SOUND
Rec eng
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hair styles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Dial supv
Const supv
Set cont
Tech adv
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Titles:
Code 3
Dial 116
Release Date:
13 March 1955
Production Date:
12 November--23 November 1954
Copyright Claimant:
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
13 March 1955
Copyright Number:
LP4491
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
62-63
Length(in feet):
5,572
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17414
SYNOPSIS

One afternoon, veteran Ralph Wyatt escapes from the Veteran's Administration Hospital psychiatric ward in Brentwood, California, where he is being held for observation, and administrator Maj. Sutter notifies the Hollywood Sheriff's station. The case is assigned to the sympathetic Lt. Andy Flynn, who has dealt with enough disturbed veterans to realize what combat can do to a man's psyche. Suspecting that Ralph will visit his estranged wife Connie, Flynn goes to her apartment, and narrowly misses Ralph, who had left after discovering that Connie was not home. Flynn talks with Connie's neighbor, writer Lloyd Lavalle, who describes Connie as a "party girl." Upon returning to the station, Flynn learns that Ralph is a highly decorated Marine who served in both World War II and Korea, and that he was sent to the hospital after being arrested in a bar fight. Ralph, who has been separated from Connie for over a year, received the final divorce papers from her that morning, and Flynn wonders if that is what prompted him to escape. Although Ralph has been diagnosed with only anxiety neurosis, Flynn muses that someone as well-trained for combat as he could still be driven to violence if the circumstances were right. Meanwhile, Connie meets with her lover, successful real estate agent Norman Roper, at a bar and gets drunk. Back at the station, Flynn sends deputy sheriff Gloria and Sgt. Tony Colombo undercover to comb the Sunset Strip bars to find Connie before Ralph does. While Gloria and Tony are out searching, Roper escorts Connie to her apartment, where she tells him that she is now divorced. Roper, who ... +


One afternoon, veteran Ralph Wyatt escapes from the Veteran's Administration Hospital psychiatric ward in Brentwood, California, where he is being held for observation, and administrator Maj. Sutter notifies the Hollywood Sheriff's station. The case is assigned to the sympathetic Lt. Andy Flynn, who has dealt with enough disturbed veterans to realize what combat can do to a man's psyche. Suspecting that Ralph will visit his estranged wife Connie, Flynn goes to her apartment, and narrowly misses Ralph, who had left after discovering that Connie was not home. Flynn talks with Connie's neighbor, writer Lloyd Lavalle, who describes Connie as a "party girl." Upon returning to the station, Flynn learns that Ralph is a highly decorated Marine who served in both World War II and Korea, and that he was sent to the hospital after being arrested in a bar fight. Ralph, who has been separated from Connie for over a year, received the final divorce papers from her that morning, and Flynn wonders if that is what prompted him to escape. Although Ralph has been diagnosed with only anxiety neurosis, Flynn muses that someone as well-trained for combat as he could still be driven to violence if the circumstances were right. Meanwhile, Connie meets with her lover, successful real estate agent Norman Roper, at a bar and gets drunk. Back at the station, Flynn sends deputy sheriff Gloria and Sgt. Tony Colombo undercover to comb the Sunset Strip bars to find Connie before Ralph does. While Gloria and Tony are out searching, Roper escorts Connie to her apartment, where she tells him that she is now divorced. Roper, who is married with a child, replies that he will not marry her, and she spitefully informs him that she is pregnant. Enraged by Connie's threat to make their affair public, Roper beats her to death, then wipes his fingerprints from the living room before leaving. Ralph again comes to the apartment building but receives no answer when he knocks at Connie's door, after which Lavalle introduces himself and warns Ralph that the sheriff's department is looking for him. Ralph, who had already called Sutter to tell him that he would be returning to the hospital that night, reveals to Lavalle that all he had wanted was to talk to Connie. Ralph then wanders over to Roper's office, where Roper has been calling clients in order to establish an alibi, to talk with him, as the two men had served together in the same Marine platoon during World War II. Claiming that he has not talked with her in a long time, Roper disavows knowledge of Connie's current circumstances, even when Ralph wonders how she could afford to live in such an elegant apartment building. Ralph confides that he escaped from the hospital, and after he departs, Roper makes an anonymous phone call to the sheriff's station to report Connie's murder. As Roper had hoped, Ralph is immediately suspected of the crime, especially when the coroner determines that Connie was killed by several judo chops to the neck, and Flynn realizes that Marines are taught judo. Soon after, Ralph goes to a bar being staked out by Gloria, and she alerts Flynn, who arrests him. Ralph maintains his innocence, and later that night, when a reporter badgers Deputy Clark for information about the suspect, Ralph learns how Connie was killed. Realizing that Roper, a fellow Marine, must have murdered Connie, Ralph manages to escape from his cell and steal Clark's gun. Flynn is called in and learns not only that Ralph was disturbed by the method of Connie's death, but that Connie was pregnant and fingerprints other than hers were found in her bedroom. Flynn then deduces that Roper is the true killer and immediately races to his house. Roper, who had been notified of Ralph's escape, lies in wait for his former friend and the two engage in a shootout. Flynn fights with Ralph and gets his weapon, however, and assures him that he believes in his innocence. Roper is apprehended, and later, his guilt is confirmed when a bartender who often saw him with Connie identifies him. Clark and the other policemen then wish Ralph good luck, and Flynn takes him out for a well-earned breakfast. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.