Is Everybody Happy? (1943)

73 mins | Drama | 28 October 1943

Director:

Charles Barton

Writer:

Monte Brice

Producer:

Irving Briskin

Cinematographers:

L. W. O'Connell, Ernest Miller

Editor:

James Sweeney

Production Designer:

Lionel Banks

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of this film was When My Baby Smiles at Me , the title of one of bandleader Ted Lewis' trademark songs. "Is Everybody Happy?" became Lewis' signature salutation while performing beginning in 1917. Although Columbia production credits list L. W. O'Connell as director of photography, a HR production chart lists Ernest Miller in that ... More Less

The working title of this film was When My Baby Smiles at Me , the title of one of bandleader Ted Lewis' trademark songs. "Is Everybody Happy?" became Lewis' signature salutation while performing beginning in 1917. Although Columbia production credits list L. W. O'Connell as director of photography, a HR production chart lists Ernest Miller in that position. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
17 Jan 44
p. 3, 8
Down Beat
1 Sep 43
p. 6.
Down Beat
15 Oct 43
p. 7.
Film Daily
28 Oct 1943.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 43
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jan 44
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
27 Nov 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
18 Sep 43
p. 1545.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 Nov 43
p. 1646.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
4 Dec 43
p. 1655.
Variety
24 Nov 43
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus dir
Spec arr
Spec arr
Spec arr
SOUND
Sd eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"Chinatown, My Chinatown," words and music by William Jerome and Jean Schwartz
"Way Down Yonder in New Orleans," words and music by Henry Creamer and J. Turner Layton
"By the Light of the Silvery Moon," words by Edward Madden, music by Gus Edwards
+
SONGS
"Chinatown, My Chinatown," words and music by William Jerome and Jean Schwartz
"Way Down Yonder in New Orleans," words and music by Henry Creamer and J. Turner Layton
"By the Light of the Silvery Moon," words by Edward Madden, music by Gus Edwards
"Sunny Side of the Street," words by Dorothy Fields, music by Jimmy McHugh
"Am I Blue?" words and music by Grant Clarke and Harry Akst
"St. Louis Blues," words and music by W. C. Handy
"Cuddle Up a Little Closer, Lovey Mine," words and music by Otto Harbach and Karl Hoschna
"When My Baby Smiles at Me," words by Andrew B. Sterling and Ted Lewis, music by Bill Munro
"I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now," words and music by Will M. Hough, Frank R. Adams, Joseph E. Howard and Harold Orlob
"Whispering," words by Malvin Schonberger, lyrics by John Schonberger
"Moonlight Bay," words by Edward Madden, music by Percy Wenrich
"Put on Your Old Grey Bonnet," words by Stanley Murphy, music by Percy Weinrich
"It's a Long, Long Way to Tipperary," words and music by Jack Judge and Harry Williams
"Smiles," words and music by J. Will Callahan and Lee G. Roberts
"Pretty Baby," words by Gus Kahn, music by Tony Jackson and Egbert Van Alstyne
"I'm Just Wild About Harry," words by Noble Sissle, music by Eubie Blake
"It Had to Be You," words by Gus Kahn, music by Isham Jones.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
When My Baby Smiles at Me
Release Date:
28 October 1943
Production Date:
23 July--17 August 1943
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
15 October 1943
Copyright Number:
LP12306
Duration(in mins):
73
Length(in feet):
6,600
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Band leader Ted Lewis is playing an engagement at a nightclub in San Francisco when he is invited by a colonel to visit a nearby army camp. There, Ted meets a young private who has organized a band and is doing an imitation of Ted singing. Thinking that the boy seems familiar, Ted makes inquiries and learns that he is Frank Stewart, Jr., son of his former vaudeville partner during the starvation days of his career. Ted invites Junior and his sweetheart Ann to be his guests at the nightclub. When he discovers that Junior loves Ann but is afraid of marriage because he fears that he might return from the war an invalid, Ted invites the couple to his apartment and tells them a story which is based on the experiences of Junior's father. Ted changes the names of the participants and recalls that in 1915 on Coney Island, Tom, Jerry and Joe, members of a struggling band, are dividing a meager paycheck. At a Friday night amateur show, singer Kitty O'Riley performs, hoping for a job. When a man in the audience insults her, Tom and Jerry come to her aid and a fight ensues. Inviting Kitty to dinner, they all go to a hamburger stand and there meet Artie, Red and Bob, musicians from New Orleans who play a type of ragtime called "jazz." Deciding to form a group with Kitty as their singer, the musicians move into Mrs. Broadbelt's boardinghouse and begin to look for theatrical bookings. They are met by resistance from booking agents, who claim that the music will not be accepted in the north. Unable ... +


Band leader Ted Lewis is playing an engagement at a nightclub in San Francisco when he is invited by a colonel to visit a nearby army camp. There, Ted meets a young private who has organized a band and is doing an imitation of Ted singing. Thinking that the boy seems familiar, Ted makes inquiries and learns that he is Frank Stewart, Jr., son of his former vaudeville partner during the starvation days of his career. Ted invites Junior and his sweetheart Ann to be his guests at the nightclub. When he discovers that Junior loves Ann but is afraid of marriage because he fears that he might return from the war an invalid, Ted invites the couple to his apartment and tells them a story which is based on the experiences of Junior's father. Ted changes the names of the participants and recalls that in 1915 on Coney Island, Tom, Jerry and Joe, members of a struggling band, are dividing a meager paycheck. At a Friday night amateur show, singer Kitty O'Riley performs, hoping for a job. When a man in the audience insults her, Tom and Jerry come to her aid and a fight ensues. Inviting Kitty to dinner, they all go to a hamburger stand and there meet Artie, Red and Bob, musicians from New Orleans who play a type of ragtime called "jazz." Deciding to form a group with Kitty as their singer, the musicians move into Mrs. Broadbelt's boardinghouse and begin to look for theatrical bookings. They are met by resistance from booking agents, who claim that the music will not be accepted in the north. Unable to pay the rent, Jerry takes the twenty dollars that Mrs. Broadbent has given him to buy a turkey and bets it on a horse. When he loses the money, Mrs. Broadbent orders them out of the house and declares that she intends to keep their musical instruments as security. By a ruse, they smuggle the instruments out, and Mrs. Broadbent then sends the police after them. While walking up Broadway, Tom, convinced that his jazz band will become successful if given the chance, decides to stage an impromptu concert on the sidewalk in front of Rector's restaurant. Larry Thew, a millionaire playboy and one of Rector's best customers, is intrigued by their music and asks Salbin, Rector's manager, to hire Tom's band to play for his party. When Salbin objects, an argument ensues and the police arrive to arrest the entire band including Kitty. Soon after, Lou Merwin, a young Broadway agent, convinces Salbin that he should placate Thew and give the band a chance. Rushing to the police station, Salbin learns that the band cannot be released until Mrs. Broadbelt withdraws her charges. After Salbin pays Mrs. Broadbelt the money owed her, the band is freed and makes their debut at Rector's. The band is an immediate sensation, and Jerry and Kitty plan to marry. On the day they are to be wed, war is declared and Jerry enlists while Tom carries on with the band. After the armistice, Jerry returns with one hand shot off, and believes that his career as a piano player is ruined. Kitty and Jerry are married, and with his wife's encouragement, Jerry learns to play the trumpet and becomes one of the greatest players ever. Returning to the present, Ted reveals that Jerry in the story is really Junior's father, and convinces the young lovers not to let the war interfere with their love. Taking Ted's advice, Junior and Ann are married in a military ceremony and celebrate to the music of Ted and his band. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.