Sincerely Yours (1955)

114-115 or 118 mins | Romance | 26 November 1955

Director:

Gordon Douglas

Writer:

Irving Wallace

Producer:

Henry Blanke

Cinematographer:

William H. Clothier

Editor:

Owen Marks

Production Designer:

Edward Carrere

Production Company:

International Artists, Ltd.
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HISTORY

NYT and HR reviews describe Sincerely Yours as a recreation of Liberace’s concert performances and a remake of the Warner Bros.’ 1932 film The Man Who Played God (see entry), which was itself a remake of the 1922 film The Man Who Played God (see entry), also based on the Jules Eckert Goodman play. Although their appearance in the film has not been confirmed, HR news items add the following actors to the cast: Doyle Brooks, Emmett Cody, Louise Lane, Jodi Kelley, John Graas, Shorty Rogers, Jimmy Fiuffre, Bud Shank, Marty Paich, Gene Gammage, Bob Manners and Michael Vallon.
       Despite the film’s generally favorable reviews and the popularity of Liberace’s television show, which ran from 1952 through 1955, Sincerely Yours was unsuccessful at the box office. As an explanation, a Dec 1955 HR article speculated that Liberace’s television fans were used to seeing him for free and a LAMirror article suggested that his fans, mostly middle-aged and older women, were not part of the younger, movie-going crowd. Although the HCN review reported that Sincerely Yours marked Liberace’s acting debut, he had previously appeared in two other films, the 1950 Universal production South Sea Sinner as a maestro and RKO’s 1951 production Footlight Varieties as himself. Sincerely Yours marked the feature film debut of Diane Brewster (1951--1991), who acted primarily on television, including appearances as the wife of "Richard Kimble" on the popular ABC Television series The Fugitive ... More Less

NYT and HR reviews describe Sincerely Yours as a recreation of Liberace’s concert performances and a remake of the Warner Bros.’ 1932 film The Man Who Played God (see entry), which was itself a remake of the 1922 film The Man Who Played God (see entry), also based on the Jules Eckert Goodman play. Although their appearance in the film has not been confirmed, HR news items add the following actors to the cast: Doyle Brooks, Emmett Cody, Louise Lane, Jodi Kelley, John Graas, Shorty Rogers, Jimmy Fiuffre, Bud Shank, Marty Paich, Gene Gammage, Bob Manners and Michael Vallon.
       Despite the film’s generally favorable reviews and the popularity of Liberace’s television show, which ran from 1952 through 1955, Sincerely Yours was unsuccessful at the box office. As an explanation, a Dec 1955 HR article speculated that Liberace’s television fans were used to seeing him for free and a LAMirror article suggested that his fans, mostly middle-aged and older women, were not part of the younger, movie-going crowd. Although the HCN review reported that Sincerely Yours marked Liberace’s acting debut, he had previously appeared in two other films, the 1950 Universal production South Sea Sinner as a maestro and RKO’s 1951 production Footlight Varieties as himself. Sincerely Yours marked the feature film debut of Diane Brewster (1951--1991), who acted primarily on television, including appearances as the wife of "Richard Kimble" on the popular ABC Television series The Fugitive (1963--1976). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
29 Oct 1955.
---
Daily Variety
28 Oct 55
p. 3.
Film Daily
28 Oct 55
p. 8.
Hollywood Citizen-News
22 Nov 1955.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 1955
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jun 1955
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun1955
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 1955
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jun 1955
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jul 1955
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 1955
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Oct 55
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 1955.
---
Los Angeles Examiner
22 Nov 1955.
---
Los Angeles Mirror
22 Nov 1955.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
29 Oct 55
p. 649.
New York Times
3 Nov 55
p. 37.
Saturday Review
26 Nov 1955.
---
Variety
2 Nov 55
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus adv
Mus synchronization
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Dial supv
Prod control
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story The Man Who Played God by Gouverneur Morris in Cosmopolitan (Jan 1912), and the play The Silent Voice by Jules Eckert Goodman (New York, 29 Dec 1914).
MUSIC
"Rhapsody in Blue," music by George Gershwin
"Beer Barrel Polka," by Lew Brown, Wladimir A. Timm and Jaromir Vejvoda
"Notre Dame Victory March," music by Michael J. Shea
+
MUSIC
"Rhapsody in Blue," music by George Gershwin
"Beer Barrel Polka," by Lew Brown, Wladimir A. Timm and Jaromir Vejvoda
"Notre Dame Victory March," music by Michael J. Shea
"Tea for Two," music by Vincent Youmans
"B Flat Concerto" and "Concerto in B Flat minor, Op. 23" and other selections by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky and Frédéric Chopin.
+
SONGS
"Sincerely Yours," music by Liberace, lyrics by Paul Francis Webster, musical arrangements by Gordon Robinson
"When Irish Eyes Are Smiling," words by Chauncey Olcott and George Graff, Jr., music by Ernest R. Ball.
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 November 1955
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 2 November 1955
Los Angeles opening: 21 November 1955
Production Date:
early June--mid July 1955
Copyright Claimant:
International Artists, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
26 November 1955
Copyright Number:
LP8141
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
WarnerColor
Duration(in mins):
114-115 or 118
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17601
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Pianist Anthony Warrin has attracted many fans by playing a combination of classical, popular and folk music. His manager, Sam Dunne, and his secretary, Marion Moore, who has secretly loved Tony for years, accompany him on his concert tours. Despite his obvious success, Tony feels he must play Carnegie Hall before he can take himself seriously as a musician and is hopeful when a Carnegie representative, J. R. Aldrich, plans to attend his concert in San Francisco. To improve his technique for the performance, Tony visits his former piano teacher, Zwolinski, but the maestro is not at home when Tony arrives. Instead, Tony finds Linda Curtis, a wealthy young woman seeking piano lessons from Zwolinski. Mistaking Tony for Zwolinski, she explains that her parents believe women of her class need proficiency in music to be “accomplished.” Tony lets Linda think that he is the older musician until Zwolinski arrives. After a brief exchange of greetings with his mentor, Tony decides that his technique is “good enough” and invites Linda to dinner. At an Italian restaurant, Tony realizes that his wallet is in his other suit and, while he negotiates with the unsympathetic proprietor, Linda pays the bill. The couple then attends a nightclub, where Tony plays an impromptu performance of boogie-woogie. The next day the couple visits a museum, where the guard recognizes Tony and shows them a room filled with antique keyboard instruments formerly played by famous composers and pianists. Inspired by the history of each instrument, Tony tries out each one, and in between playing, proposes to Linda. Although he wants to marry soon, she asks for time, as they have known each ... +


Pianist Anthony Warrin has attracted many fans by playing a combination of classical, popular and folk music. His manager, Sam Dunne, and his secretary, Marion Moore, who has secretly loved Tony for years, accompany him on his concert tours. Despite his obvious success, Tony feels he must play Carnegie Hall before he can take himself seriously as a musician and is hopeful when a Carnegie representative, J. R. Aldrich, plans to attend his concert in San Francisco. To improve his technique for the performance, Tony visits his former piano teacher, Zwolinski, but the maestro is not at home when Tony arrives. Instead, Tony finds Linda Curtis, a wealthy young woman seeking piano lessons from Zwolinski. Mistaking Tony for Zwolinski, she explains that her parents believe women of her class need proficiency in music to be “accomplished.” Tony lets Linda think that he is the older musician until Zwolinski arrives. After a brief exchange of greetings with his mentor, Tony decides that his technique is “good enough” and invites Linda to dinner. At an Italian restaurant, Tony realizes that his wallet is in his other suit and, while he negotiates with the unsympathetic proprietor, Linda pays the bill. The couple then attends a nightclub, where Tony plays an impromptu performance of boogie-woogie. The next day the couple visits a museum, where the guard recognizes Tony and shows them a room filled with antique keyboard instruments formerly played by famous composers and pianists. Inspired by the history of each instrument, Tony tries out each one, and in between playing, proposes to Linda. Although he wants to marry soon, she asks for time, as they have known each other only twenty-six hours. At Tony’s San Francisco concert, Linda meets Howard Ferguson, a soldier returning from China at the end of his tour of duty. At intermission, Howard shares with her his regard for Tony’s talent and his own determination to return to composing. Aldrich arrives late for the concert, while Tony is taking requests from the audience for an encore. After hearing Tony, Aldrich sets a date for him to play at Carnegie in four weeks’ time. However, on the night of his Carnegie performance, Tony suddenly loses his hearing and must cancel. Dr. Eubank diagnoses the problem as a rare, recurring condition that can only be resolved by a dangerous operation that will either cure him or leave him permanently deaf. After asking Eubank for time to decide whether to undergo the operation, Tony stops seeing Linda, while he “thinks things out.” At Eubank’s suggestion, Tony takes lessons in lipreading from Mr. Rojeck. During a self-imposed exile in his New York penthouse, Tony reads about the life of Beethoven and practices lipreading by using spyglasses to watch people in Central Park. He soon becomes interested in a child, Alvie Hunt, whose handicapped legs prevent him from playing football with other children. Questioning God’s existence, Tony considers throwing himself off the balcony, but Marion stops him. After she encourages him to get out of the apartment, Tony follows Alvie and his grandfather to church, where they daily pray for Alvie’s healing. On another day, when Tony sees Alvie tell his grandfather that he has lost faith in prayer, he has Marion deliver money to the Hunts for an operation for Alvie. Later, during the night, hearing the tick of his antique clocks, Tony realizes that his hearing has returned, at least temporarily, but continues to follow the activities in Central Park through his binoculars. Tony watches as Mrs. McGinley and her recently married daughter, Sarah Cosgrove, meet each week on a park bench. Sarah, who has married into a wealthy family, is ashamed of her lowly roots and has delayed introducing her husband and in-laws to her mother. When Tony sees Sarah cancel an outing with her mother for a charity event in which her in-laws are involved, he escorts Mrs. McGinley to the event after treating her to a new dress and hairstyle. Surprised to encounter her mother, Sarah introduces Mrs. McGinley to the Cosgroves. Although mother and daughter are reunited, Tony’s happiness is short-lived when he again loses his hearing. Although Sam knows about the recurrence, Tony asks him not to trouble Marion with the news. Marion, knowing Linda will take care of Tony, hands in her resignation when the couple set their wedding date. On Christmas Eve, Tony and Marion exchange presents and she says goodbye. Sad that she is leaving, Tony watches her from the balcony. As her taxi drives away, Linda's car approaches and Tony sees her meet Howard on a park bench. Tony watches as Linda admits to Howard that she loves him, but plans to remain with Tony because of his illness. When she comes upstairs to his apartment, Tony tells Linda that he saw her with Howard, and believes they belong together. After she departs, a recovering Alvie and his grandpa come to visit. Tony gives Alvie a football and helmet, and Alvie presents Tony with a charm that he wore in the hospital for courage. The charm convinces Tony to undergo his own operation, which, to his relief, restores his hearing. Later, when he performs an all-classical concert at Carnegie Hall, his many friends attend, while Sam and Aldrich listen backstage. Afterward, Aldrich suggests that Tony focus on classical music, but Tony says he can never give up his “old friends.” For an encore, Tony plays “When Irish Eyes Are Smiling” for Mrs. McGinley, and she and Mrs. Cosgrove sing along, soon joined by the rest of the audience. Tony segues into a football victory song for Alvie, and for Linda and Howard, Tony plays, and then tap dances to, the song “Tea for Two.” After taking his final bows, Tony finds Marion waiting for him and welcomes her back with a kiss.


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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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