Three for the Show (1955)

91 or 93 mins | Musical comedy | April 1955

Director:

H. C. Potter

Producer:

Jonie Taps

Cinematographer:

Arthur E. Arling

Editor:

Viola Lawrence

Production Designer:

Walter Holscher

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Working titles of the film were Three for the Money and The Pleasure Is All Mine . According to a Jan 1955 DV news item, release of the film was put on hold because the National Catholic Legion of Decency threatened to give it a “C” (for condemned) rating due to the narrative’s suggestion that “Julie Lowndes” readily accepted a bigamous arrangement. A Feb 1955 DV item indicates that after Columbia made some minor revisions to the film, it was awarded a “B” rating by the Legion.
       A May 1954 HR news item lists Patricia Denise in the cast, but her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. The film marked the return to the screen after a two-year hiatus of singer-dancer and 1940’s “pin-up” icon Betty Grable, who made one other film, Twentieth Century-Fox’s 1955 production How to Be Very, Very Popular (see above), before retiring permanently from motion pictures. The film marked the final screen appearance of Gower Champion and the last joint appearance of the husband-and-wife dance team Marge and Gower Champion. In 1940, Columbia released a non-musical production of the Somerset Maugham story, entitled Too Many Husbands , starring Jean Arthur, Fred MacMurray and Melvyn Douglas, directed by Wesley Ruggles. ... More Less

Working titles of the film were Three for the Money and The Pleasure Is All Mine . According to a Jan 1955 DV news item, release of the film was put on hold because the National Catholic Legion of Decency threatened to give it a “C” (for condemned) rating due to the narrative’s suggestion that “Julie Lowndes” readily accepted a bigamous arrangement. A Feb 1955 DV item indicates that after Columbia made some minor revisions to the film, it was awarded a “B” rating by the Legion.
       A May 1954 HR news item lists Patricia Denise in the cast, but her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. The film marked the return to the screen after a two-year hiatus of singer-dancer and 1940’s “pin-up” icon Betty Grable, who made one other film, Twentieth Century-Fox’s 1955 production How to Be Very, Very Popular (see above), before retiring permanently from motion pictures. The film marked the final screen appearance of Gower Champion and the last joint appearance of the husband-and-wife dance team Marge and Gower Champion. In 1940, Columbia released a non-musical production of the Somerset Maugham story, entitled Too Many Husbands , starring Jean Arthur, Fred MacMurray and Melvyn Douglas, directed by Wesley Ruggles. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
26 Feb 1955.
---
Daily Variety
19 Jan 1955.
---
Daily Variety
16 Feb 1955.
---
Daily Variety
25 Feb 55
p. 3.
Film Daily
28 Feb 55
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Feb 1954
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Feb 1954
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 1954
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 1954
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 55
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
26 Feb 55
p. 337.
New York Times
25 Feb 55
p. 16.
Variety
16 Feb 55
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
All mus under the personal supv of and cond
Orig mus and arr
SOUND
Rec supv
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair styles
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Too Many Husbands by W. Somerset Maugham (Atlantic City, NJ, 4 Aug 1919).
SONGS
"Someone to Watch Over Me" and "I've Got a Crush n You," music by George Gershwin, words by Ira Gershwin
"How Come You Do Me Like You Do?" words and music by Gene Austin and Ray Bergere
"Down Boy," words and music by Hoagy Carmichael and Harold Adamson
+
SONGS
"Someone to Watch Over Me" and "I've Got a Crush n You," music by George Gershwin, words by Ira Gershwin
"How Come You Do Me Like You Do?" words and music by Gene Austin and Ray Bergere
"Down Boy," words and music by Hoagy Carmichael and Harold Adamson
"Which One?" words and music by Lester Lee and Ned Washington
"I've Been Kissed Before," words and music by Bob Russell and Lester Lee.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Pleasure Is All Mine
Three for the Money
Release Date:
April 1955
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 24 February 1955
Production Date:
16 February--21 May 1954
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
15 January 1955
Copyright Number:
LP4358
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
91 or 93
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16952
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Musical husband and wife team Julie and Vernon Lowndes excitedly anticipate a vacation after the close of their long-running show. On closing night, airman Martin “Marty” Stewart, Vernon’s writing partner and Julie’s former husband, who was reported killed in Korea two years earlier, shows up at the theater. Stunned, Julie promptly faints, but is revived by friend and dance partner Gwen Howard, who encourages Julie to tell Vernon of Marty’s miraculous return. Vernon is astonished by the news that Marty has spent the past two years marooned on a desert island and is in perfect health, but neither he nor Julie has the nerve to admit their marriage to Marty. Anxious to be alone with Julie, Marty is dismayed when Vernon, Gwen and the show’s producer, Mike Hudson, all accompany the couple back to Julie’s apartment. After much hesitation and awkwardness, Gwen, who has loved both Marty and Vernon for several years, reveals the truth to Marty, who is furious and knocks Vernon down. Both men are outraged when Julie admits she cannot choose between them, and Gwen admits she too would have difficulty choosing. The following day, Julie visits U.S. Air Force Col. Wharton, who accepts responsibility for Julie’s unusual situation because he misinformed her of Marty’s death. When Wharton is unable to say for certain which marriage is in fact legal, Julie falls into a delighted reverie, imagining having a dozen husbands. Finding their situation broadcast on the entertainment news, Marty and Vernon quarrel, but their fistfight is interrupted by Julie, who informs them she will remain with them both until she is able to decide who to ... +


Musical husband and wife team Julie and Vernon Lowndes excitedly anticipate a vacation after the close of their long-running show. On closing night, airman Martin “Marty” Stewart, Vernon’s writing partner and Julie’s former husband, who was reported killed in Korea two years earlier, shows up at the theater. Stunned, Julie promptly faints, but is revived by friend and dance partner Gwen Howard, who encourages Julie to tell Vernon of Marty’s miraculous return. Vernon is astonished by the news that Marty has spent the past two years marooned on a desert island and is in perfect health, but neither he nor Julie has the nerve to admit their marriage to Marty. Anxious to be alone with Julie, Marty is dismayed when Vernon, Gwen and the show’s producer, Mike Hudson, all accompany the couple back to Julie’s apartment. After much hesitation and awkwardness, Gwen, who has loved both Marty and Vernon for several years, reveals the truth to Marty, who is furious and knocks Vernon down. Both men are outraged when Julie admits she cannot choose between them, and Gwen admits she too would have difficulty choosing. The following day, Julie visits U.S. Air Force Col. Wharton, who accepts responsibility for Julie’s unusual situation because he misinformed her of Marty’s death. When Wharton is unable to say for certain which marriage is in fact legal, Julie falls into a delighted reverie, imagining having a dozen husbands. Finding their situation broadcast on the entertainment news, Marty and Vernon quarrel, but their fistfight is interrupted by Julie, who informs them she will remain with them both until she is able to decide who to choose. Meanwhile, Gwen laments with Mike that Julie has always had both men, while she has neither. Angered over Julie’s casual treatment of them, Marty and Vernon move into the Waldorf to await her decision. The next day, Marty fools Julie into thinking she has a meeting with Wharton, then spirits her away to the restaurant and club where they met. They recall six years earlier: Marty, Vernon and Gwen rehearse a new show for the club when Julie, an unemployed dance hall singer, arrives seeking work. Marty reluctantly agrees to audition Julie, but she passes out from hunger until Marty revives her with dinner. Julie tries out a worn number, but when she sings a new song suggested by Marty, they fall in love with each other. In the present, Julie agrees that she has always loved Marty and will tell Vernon of her decision. Later, Julie is disappointed that Vernon readily accepts her choice and encourages him to fight for her. Heartened, Vernon declares his love causing Julie to swoon and admit that she still loves him. Both Marty and Vernon sneak into Julie’s apartment, each believing himself alone, and gleefully prepares for a romantic evening with her. Julie comes home and discovering them both waiting anxiously, faints. Furious, Marty departs for Reno for a divorce and Vernon moves out for good. Anxious to help, Mike suggests to Vernon that he write a show for Gwen, knowing it will anger both Julie and Marty. Vernon agrees and quickly writes a new musical show, Rise Above It . During rehearsal, Vernon finds himself attracted to Gwen, and Mike uses the opportunity to publicize that the show is in trouble and needs a rewrite. Reading about the show’s difficulties in Reno, Marty hastens back to New York, where he offers to help Vernon. Vernon reluctantly agrees, but both men balk when a few days later Julie arrives from California offering to help. They grudgingly give her a part in the show, but after several days of harsh rehearsal with Marty, Julie confides in Gwen that she has realized she loves Marty. Gwen assures Julie that Marty loves her, but Julie wants him to tell her so. Gwen suggests that Julie swallow her pride, so during the dress rehearsal, Julie sings her solo number directly to Marty, which convinces him of her feelings. The two are then reunited as Gwen and Vernon look on happily. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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