Timberjack (1955)

92 or 94 mins | Western | 28 February 1955

Director:

Joseph I. Kane

Writer:

Allen Rivkin

Cinematographer:

Jack Marta

Production Designer:

Frank Arrigo

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

An acknowledgment after the opening credits reads: "This picture was produced in Glacier National Park and Western Montana, U.S.A. by the Republic Studio Organization." Although Jun and Aug 1954 HR news items announced that the film would be shot on location in British Columbia, it was not. A Sep 1954 HR news item reported that filming took place at the Hubbard Dam and St. Mary’s Lake, MT. The title song was recorded on the Coral label by the Lancers, according to the MPH review. Composer-lyricist Hoagy Carmichael, who portrayed "Jingles" in the film, sang his song "My Dog" to a dog sitting on the piano, for the entertainment of the dance hall girls. A modern source adds Chuck Roberson to the cast. ...

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An acknowledgment after the opening credits reads: "This picture was produced in Glacier National Park and Western Montana, U.S.A. by the Republic Studio Organization." Although Jun and Aug 1954 HR news items announced that the film would be shot on location in British Columbia, it was not. A Sep 1954 HR news item reported that filming took place at the Hubbard Dam and St. Mary’s Lake, MT. The title song was recorded on the Coral label by the Lancers, according to the MPH review. Composer-lyricist Hoagy Carmichael, who portrayed "Jingles" in the film, sang his song "My Dog" to a dog sitting on the piano, for the entertainment of the dance hall girls. A modern source adds Chuck Roberson to the cast.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Feb 1955
---
Daily Variety
13 Nov 1953
---
Daily Variety
7 Feb 1955
p. 3
Film Daily
18 Feb 1955
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 1954
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 1954
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
18 Aug 1954
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
30 Aug 1954
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 1954
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 1954
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 1954
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 1954
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
30 Dec 1954
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
2 Mar 1955
pp. 8-9
Los Angeles Times
3 Mar 1955
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
12 Feb 1955
p. 321
New York Times
10 Mar 1955
p. 33
Variety
9 Feb 1955
p. 11
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Joe Kane
Dir
Asst dir
Bill Sheehan
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
Joe Kane
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Unit mgr
Loc mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Timberjack by Dan Cushman (New York, 1953).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
MUSIC
"The Tambourine Waltz" and "What Ev'ry Young Girl Should Know," music and lyrics by Paul Francis Webster and Hoagy Carmichael; "He's Dead but He Won't Lie Down," music and lyrics by Johnny Mercer and Hoagy Carmichael; "Timberjack," music by Victor Young, lyrics by Ned Washington, performed by the Lancers; "My Dog," music and lyrics by Hoagy Carmichael.
PERFORMED BY
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 February 1955
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Missoula, MT: 4 Feb 1955
Production Date:
7 Sep--early Oct 1954
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Republic Pictures Corp.
16 December 1954
LP4579
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Trucolor by Consolidated
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
92 or 94
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17302
SYNOPSIS

In the late 1800s, college-educated Tim Chipman returns to his boyhood home in the Talka area of Montana, after learning that his father, a lumberman who owns substantial timber property, has had a serious accident. Arriving after the elder Chipman has died, Tim learns the sad news from his former sweetheart, Lynne Tilton, who owns and performs in the popular saloon and dance hall “Vermillion Belle.” A private talk with Steve Riika, the Chipmans' foreman and close family friend, increases Tim’s suspicion that behind his father’s death was foul play orchestrated by Croft Brunner, another logging operator who co-owns the Chipmans' small railroad connected to the main line. The scheming Brunner, who was often at odds with Chipman, Sr., charges an $11,000 assessment on Chipman timber stock and prevents Tim from getting his lumber to market by closing the railroad until it is paid. Brunner then offers to buy Chipman land, claiming that he will pay more for it than it is worth. However, Tim has secretly been told by Lynne’s father, Swiftwater “Swiftie” Tilton, who is also Brunner’s lawyer, why Brunner wants the land: Brunner has found a loophole in an old legal restriction that has prevented the clearcutting of old growth for several decades. Knowing that the old growth timber on his land can now be cut, Tim also realizes that his land is much more valuable that Brunner's offer and refuses to sell. Meanwhile, although Swiftie is beginning to realize how far Brunner will go to achieve his ambitions, Lynne is considering marriage to the businessman and refuses to believe Tim, when he tells her his suspicion that Brunner murdered his father. Still, she remains ...

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In the late 1800s, college-educated Tim Chipman returns to his boyhood home in the Talka area of Montana, after learning that his father, a lumberman who owns substantial timber property, has had a serious accident. Arriving after the elder Chipman has died, Tim learns the sad news from his former sweetheart, Lynne Tilton, who owns and performs in the popular saloon and dance hall “Vermillion Belle.” A private talk with Steve Riika, the Chipmans' foreman and close family friend, increases Tim’s suspicion that behind his father’s death was foul play orchestrated by Croft Brunner, another logging operator who co-owns the Chipmans' small railroad connected to the main line. The scheming Brunner, who was often at odds with Chipman, Sr., charges an $11,000 assessment on Chipman timber stock and prevents Tim from getting his lumber to market by closing the railroad until it is paid. Brunner then offers to buy Chipman land, claiming that he will pay more for it than it is worth. However, Tim has secretly been told by Lynne’s father, Swiftwater “Swiftie” Tilton, who is also Brunner’s lawyer, why Brunner wants the land: Brunner has found a loophole in an old legal restriction that has prevented the clearcutting of old growth for several decades. Knowing that the old growth timber on his land can now be cut, Tim also realizes that his land is much more valuable that Brunner's offer and refuses to sell. Meanwhile, although Swiftie is beginning to realize how far Brunner will go to achieve his ambitions, Lynne is considering marriage to the businessman and refuses to believe Tim, when he tells her his suspicion that Brunner murdered his father. Still, she remains loyal to Tim and when three Brunner employees, Axe-Handle Ole, Punky and Red Bush, beat Tim up, Lynne and her piano player, Jingles, come to Tim’s rescue. After Tim recuperates, he and Steve make plans to sneak the timber out at night. While Tim and his men steal the train engine and several flat cars away from the station, Lynne tries to avoid a violent showdown between the two factions by distracting Brunner’s men with a high-spirited performance accompanied by the accordian-playing Jingles. Brunner, having been alerted by Tim’s man, Pauquette, orders his men to follow the train to the loading area, but, despite a rowdy fistfight, they are unable to prevent the shipment from leaving. Later, Brunner kills the inebriated Swiftie in an argument and has his body hidden in the woods. Although Swiftie’s death appears accidental, Jingles points out that Swiftie never went anywhere without a hat, yet no hat was found near his body. Ole, despite his penchant for roughhousing, is uncomfortable with Swiftie’s death and switches his allegiance to Tim, who hires him with some misgivings. Brunner, meanwhile, sends for ammunition specialists to dynamite the waterway Tim is using to transport his lumber to market. After learning about the dynamiters, Lynne confronts Brunner in his office and finds Swiftie’s hat. When he threatens her and tries to prevent her from leaving with evidence of his guilt, she shoots Brunner in the arm, and with Jingles' help, rushes out to warn Tim. Using information supplied by Pauquette, Brunner finds Lynne alone and they exchange gunfire, until Tim and Steve, alerted by Jingles, rescue her. Remembering his father’s words, that the only way to stop Brunner is to kill him, Tim pursues Brunner in the woods, where he kills his foe in a shootout. With Brunner dead, his men go quietly when Tim orders them out of the area. Ole then confesses that Brunner killed the older and frailer Chipman during an argument that turned into a fistfight. Later, at Tim and Lynne’s wedding celebration at the Vermillion Belle, Lynne hands over the ownership of the dance hall to Jingles.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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