It Ain't Hay (1943)

79 or 81 mins | Comedy | 13 March 1943

Director:

Erle C. Kenton

Producer:

Alex Gottlieb

Cinematographer:

Charles Van Enger

Editor:

Frank Gross

Production Designer:

John Goodman

Production Company:

Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Princess O'Hara and Hold Your Horses . According to HR , Edward Cline directed second-unit footage, which included background footage shot at a racetrack in Pleasanton, CA in late Sep 1942. The second unit was forced, due to road conditions, to use stage horses to transport equipment from the Pleasanton train station to the racetrack. HR also reported that the first unit went on location for three days in mid-Oct 1942 to film at the Huntington Hotel in Pasadena, CA. In early Oct 1942, HR announced Louis Da Pron as the dance director of the film, though Danny Dare is listed in that position by onscreen credits and contemporary reviews. Actress Patsy O'Connor, who played "Peggy, Princess O'Hara" in this film, was the niece of Universal star Donald O'Connor. Damon Runyon's story was previously filmed by Universal in 1935 as Princess O'Hara , starring Jean Parker and Chester Morris and directed by David Burton (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Princess O'Hara and Hold Your Horses . According to HR , Edward Cline directed second-unit footage, which included background footage shot at a racetrack in Pleasanton, CA in late Sep 1942. The second unit was forced, due to road conditions, to use stage horses to transport equipment from the Pleasanton train station to the racetrack. HR also reported that the first unit went on location for three days in mid-Oct 1942 to film at the Huntington Hotel in Pasadena, CA. In early Oct 1942, HR announced Louis Da Pron as the dance director of the film, though Danny Dare is listed in that position by onscreen credits and contemporary reviews. Actress Patsy O'Connor, who played "Peggy, Princess O'Hara" in this film, was the niece of Universal star Donald O'Connor. Damon Runyon's story was previously filmed by Universal in 1935 as Princess O'Hara , starring Jean Parker and Chester Morris and directed by David Burton (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.3531). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
20 Mar 1943.
---
Daily Variety
25 Sep 1942.
---
Daily Variety
12 Mar 43
p. 3.
Film Daily
22 Mar 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Sep 42
p. 4, 7
Hollywood Reporter
6 Oct 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Oct 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Oct 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Mar 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
7 May 43
p. 7.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
12 Dec 42
p. 1058.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 Mar 43
p. 1201.
New York Times
11 Mar 43
p. 17.
Variety
17 Mar 43
p. 8.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
The Four Step Brothers
Harry Harvey
Ed Foster
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
[Sd] tech
DANCE
Mus numbers staged by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Princess O'Hara" by Damon Runyon in Collier's (3 Mar 1934).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Sunbeam Serenade," "Hang Your Troubles on a Rainbow," "Glory Be" and "Old Timer," music by Harry Revel, lyrics by Paul Francis Webster.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Hold Your Horses
Princess O'Hara
Release Date:
13 March 1943
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 10 March 1943
Production Date:
28 September--11 November 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
25 March 1943
Copyright Number:
LP11935
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
79 or 81
Length(in feet):
7,251
Country:
United States
PCA No:
8939
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Private Joe Collins tells his friends, taxi driver Wilbur Hoolihan and unemployed Grover Mockridge, that, having falsely bragged to his colleagues at Camp Saratoga that he "knows all the big stars on Broadway," he has been sent to New York City to arrange entertainment for an army camp show. Later, Wilbur gets into trouble himself, when he becomes trapped inside a cafeteria because he is unable to pay his bill. After Wilbur manages to sneak out of the cafeteria with the help of Grover, Joe and Peggy "Princess" O'Hara, Kitty McGloin, Joe's girl friend, and Gregory Warner, an efficiency expert, are fired. Wilbur then learns that Finnegan, the horse owned by carriage driver King O'Hara, Princess's father, has fallen ill after eating some peppermint candy he gave it, and the cab driver rushes to the stables to nurse his friend's horse back to health. The next day, however, Finnegan dies and the neighborhood accuses Wilbur of killing the elderly horse. In an attempt to raise money to buy the O'Haras a new horse, Wilbur and Grover go to the Sportsmans Club, where they borrow $100 from loan shark Big-Hearted Charlie. They initially lose their money to Slicker, a crooked bookmaker, in a series of phony horse races, but when Grover discovers Slicker's scam, they end up doubling their money. Wilbur soon loses their winnings, however, when he buys a policeman's horse from a Broadway confidence man. Later, Wilbur and Grover are told by gamblers Umbrella Sam, Harry the Horse and Chauncey the Eye that there is a horse named Boimel at the Empire City Racetrack whose owner is "willing to give it away." ... +


Private Joe Collins tells his friends, taxi driver Wilbur Hoolihan and unemployed Grover Mockridge, that, having falsely bragged to his colleagues at Camp Saratoga that he "knows all the big stars on Broadway," he has been sent to New York City to arrange entertainment for an army camp show. Later, Wilbur gets into trouble himself, when he becomes trapped inside a cafeteria because he is unable to pay his bill. After Wilbur manages to sneak out of the cafeteria with the help of Grover, Joe and Peggy "Princess" O'Hara, Kitty McGloin, Joe's girl friend, and Gregory Warner, an efficiency expert, are fired. Wilbur then learns that Finnegan, the horse owned by carriage driver King O'Hara, Princess's father, has fallen ill after eating some peppermint candy he gave it, and the cab driver rushes to the stables to nurse his friend's horse back to health. The next day, however, Finnegan dies and the neighborhood accuses Wilbur of killing the elderly horse. In an attempt to raise money to buy the O'Haras a new horse, Wilbur and Grover go to the Sportsmans Club, where they borrow $100 from loan shark Big-Hearted Charlie. They initially lose their money to Slicker, a crooked bookmaker, in a series of phony horse races, but when Grover discovers Slicker's scam, they end up doubling their money. Wilbur soon loses their winnings, however, when he buys a policeman's horse from a Broadway confidence man. Later, Wilbur and Grover are told by gamblers Umbrella Sam, Harry the Horse and Chauncey the Eye that there is a horse named Boimel at the Empire City Racetrack whose owner is "willing to give it away." That night, however, Wilbur and Grover mistakenly take Boimel's stablemate, world-famous racing champion Tea Biscuit. The next day, Tea Biscuit's kidnapping is front-page news, and learning that King has taken a drunken fare to Saratoga, Wilbur and company rush there to tell the carriage driver about their mistake. They hide the horse in the exclusive Oaks Hotel, where Warner has just been hired as manager. Wilbur and Grover manage to escape the hotel with Tea Biscuit, though Warner tells their friends that he will buy the horse for $500, knowing that there is a $10,000 reward for Tea Biscuit's safe return. Separated from Grover and Princess, Wilbur rides Tea Biscuit onto the Saratoga racetrack, unaware that the missing horse has been sentimentally entered in the Saratoga Handicap by its owner, Colonel Brainard. Wilbur is thrown from the horse onto Rhubarb, another horse, which he then rides in the featured race. Thinking that Wilbur is riding the racing champion, Grover places a $100 bet on Tea Biscuit, but Wilbur loses the race when he stops before the finish line to see if he can make the odds go up. Warner then buys Wilbur's horse for $500, and the taxi driver gives the money to Joe so that he can hire entertainment for the army camp show. Meanwhile, it is discovered that Tea Biscuit was the actual winner of the race, earning Grover $10,000, but he tears up the ticket and throws it away. Wilbur and Grover find the ticket, however, and they buy King a new horse and carriage. Joe's army show at the Oaks Hotel is a great success, despite the intrusion of Wilbur and Grover, who have been chased onstage by the irate Warner. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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