It Comes Up Love (1943)

63-64 mins | Comedy-drama | 9 April 1943

Director:

Charles Lamont

Cinematographer:

George Robinson

Editor:

Paul Landres

Production Designer:

Jack Otterson

Production Company:

Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was On the Beam ... More Less

The working title of this film was On the Beam . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Feb 1943.
---
Daily Variety
17 Jul 1942.
---
Daily Variety
28 Jan 43
p. 3.
Film Daily
25 Jan 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 42
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Aug 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jan 43
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 Oct 42
p. 986.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Feb 43
p. 1146.
New York Times
22 Jan 43
p. 25.
Variety
27 Jan 43
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Suggested by a story by
Suggested by a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
[Sd] tech
SOURCES
SONGS
"Love's Old Sweet Song," words and music by G. Clifton Bingham and James Lyman Molloy
"What the Rose Said to Me," music by Leo Edwards, lyrics by B. F. Barnet
"Say Si, Si," words and music by Ernesto Lecuona, English lyrics by Al Stillman and Francia Luban
+
SONGS
"Love's Old Sweet Song," words and music by G. Clifton Bingham and James Lyman Molloy
"What the Rose Said to Me," music by Leo Edwards, lyrics by B. F. Barnet
"Say Si, Si," words and music by Ernesto Lecuona, English lyrics by Al Stillman and Francia Luban
"Vama a Ver," words and music by Rubin Guevara.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
On the Beam
Release Date:
9 April 1943
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 21 January 1943
Production Date:
13 July--late July 1942
addl seq mid August 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
21 September 1942
Copyright Number:
LP11596
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
63-64
Length(in feet):
5,833
Country:
United States
PCA No:
8747
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

New York architect Tom Peabody is pursued by widow Portia Winthrop, much to the amusement of his co-worker, interior decorator Edo Ives. Later, widower Tom tells Edo that his mother is sending his two teenage daughters, Victoria and Constance, to live with him. The two young ladies, who have been reared in the strict social graces by their grandmother, disapprove of their father's friendship with Edo, as they have been taught that women of quality "do not enter trade." Portia soon ingratiates herself with Victoria and Constance, and Edo tries to do the same by dangling her seventeen-year-old nephew Ricky before Victoria. At his mother's urging, Portia's son Carlton holds a party for Victoria and Constance, and Edo bribes Ricky so that he will attend as well. Seeing Victoria being treated like a wallflower at her own party, Ricky steps forward and turns her classical song rendition into a swing festival. Later, Edo forces Ricky to ask Victoria to the Crane Club, and to their surprise, she accepts. At the nightclub, Ricky teaches Victoria some new dance steps, and the older Peabody daughter soon finds herself singing for the crowd. The next day, Victoria becomes a front-page tabloid story, much to the delight of her father and the chagrin of Portia. After Portia convinces Tom that Ricky is a bad influence on his daughter, Victoria secretly meets with Ricky to tell him that they are no longer allowed to see each other. Edo, upset with Tom over his decision, supports the ban and refuses to let Victoria even speak to Ricky. Later, Portia tricks Tom into an engagement, and Victoria and Edo commiserate ... +


New York architect Tom Peabody is pursued by widow Portia Winthrop, much to the amusement of his co-worker, interior decorator Edo Ives. Later, widower Tom tells Edo that his mother is sending his two teenage daughters, Victoria and Constance, to live with him. The two young ladies, who have been reared in the strict social graces by their grandmother, disapprove of their father's friendship with Edo, as they have been taught that women of quality "do not enter trade." Portia soon ingratiates herself with Victoria and Constance, and Edo tries to do the same by dangling her seventeen-year-old nephew Ricky before Victoria. At his mother's urging, Portia's son Carlton holds a party for Victoria and Constance, and Edo bribes Ricky so that he will attend as well. Seeing Victoria being treated like a wallflower at her own party, Ricky steps forward and turns her classical song rendition into a swing festival. Later, Edo forces Ricky to ask Victoria to the Crane Club, and to their surprise, she accepts. At the nightclub, Ricky teaches Victoria some new dance steps, and the older Peabody daughter soon finds herself singing for the crowd. The next day, Victoria becomes a front-page tabloid story, much to the delight of her father and the chagrin of Portia. After Portia convinces Tom that Ricky is a bad influence on his daughter, Victoria secretly meets with Ricky to tell him that they are no longer allowed to see each other. Edo, upset with Tom over his decision, supports the ban and refuses to let Victoria even speak to Ricky. Later, Portia tricks Tom into an engagement, and Victoria and Edo commiserate together over their broken hearts. Edo then does a complete makeover of Victoria, and to arouse her nephew's jealousy, she invites him to join them at the Crane Club with Carlton. Later, in order to break her father's engagement, Constance tells Tom and Portia that Victoria and Ricky have decided to elope. As hoped, Tom uses the elopement as an excuse to get away from Portia, and he and Edo then decide to elope themselves to Greenwich. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.