Julie (1956)

97, 99 or 109 mins | Melodrama | 4 October 1956

Director:

Andrew L. Stone

Writer:

Andrew L. Stone

Producer:

Martin Melcher

Cinematographer:

Fred Jackman Jr.

Editor:

Virginia Stone

Production Companies:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp., Arwin Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

Doris Day sings the song "Julie" during the opening credits. Her voice-over narration is heard throughout the film, describing "Julie Benton's" increasing anxieties over her husband. Andrew L. Stone's onscreen credit reads: "Written and directed by Andrew L. Stone,” while his wife Virginia Stone's onscreen credit reads: "Assistant to Producer and Film Editor Virginia Stone." Julie marked the first film of Arwin Productions, Inc., a company owned by Day and her husband, Martin Melcher. Julie was also Melcher’s first film as a producer. The NYT review mistakenly lists John Gallaudet as Frank Gallaudet.
       A 15 Mar 1956 HR states that Anne Francis was first considered for the lead. Although a 5 Mar 1956 HR news item reported that Paul Francis Webster and Jerry Livingston were assigned to write a song for Doris Day to sing in the movie, Leith Stevens and Tom Adair were later assigned to compose the song "Julie" for her. A 16 Apr 1956 HR new item adds Eddie Mann and Don Russell to the cast. Modern sources add Frank Marlowe ( Second police guard ) and Marjorie Stapp ( Cliff’s secretary ) to the cast.
       Portions of the film were shot on location in San Francisco, in the Northern California coastal regions of Carmel and Monterey, as well as the Southern California desert locations of Blythe and Indio. Airport sequences were shot at the Oakland, CA airport. Julie received Academy Award nominations for Best Screenplay and Best ... More Less

Doris Day sings the song "Julie" during the opening credits. Her voice-over narration is heard throughout the film, describing "Julie Benton's" increasing anxieties over her husband. Andrew L. Stone's onscreen credit reads: "Written and directed by Andrew L. Stone,” while his wife Virginia Stone's onscreen credit reads: "Assistant to Producer and Film Editor Virginia Stone." Julie marked the first film of Arwin Productions, Inc., a company owned by Day and her husband, Martin Melcher. Julie was also Melcher’s first film as a producer. The NYT review mistakenly lists John Gallaudet as Frank Gallaudet.
       A 15 Mar 1956 HR states that Anne Francis was first considered for the lead. Although a 5 Mar 1956 HR news item reported that Paul Francis Webster and Jerry Livingston were assigned to write a song for Doris Day to sing in the movie, Leith Stevens and Tom Adair were later assigned to compose the song "Julie" for her. A 16 Apr 1956 HR new item adds Eddie Mann and Don Russell to the cast. Modern sources add Frank Marlowe ( Second police guard ) and Marjorie Stapp ( Cliff’s secretary ) to the cast.
       Portions of the film were shot on location in San Francisco, in the Northern California coastal regions of Carmel and Monterey, as well as the Southern California desert locations of Blythe and Indio. Airport sequences were shot at the Oakland, CA airport. Julie received Academy Award nominations for Best Screenplay and Best Song.

More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Oct 1956.
---
Cue
24 Nov 1956.
---
Daily Variety
2 Oct 56
p. 3.
Film Daily
4 Oct 56
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jan 1956
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Mar 1956
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 1956
p. 6, 12.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 1956
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 1956
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 1956
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 1956
p. 3, 12.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 1956
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Apr 1956
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 1956
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Oct 56
p. 3.
Life
19 Nov 1956.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Sep 1956.
---
Motion Picture Daily
2 Oct 1956.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Oct 56
p. 97.
New York Herald Tribune
22 Nov 1956.
---
New York Times
22 Nov 56
p. 51.
Newsweek
26 Nov 1956.
---
Saturday Review
17 Nov 1956.
---
Time
19 Nov 1956.
---
Variety
3 Oct 56
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to prod
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Midnight on the Cliff" composed and performed by Leonard Pennario.
SONGS
"Julie," music and lyrics by Leith Stevens and Tom Adair.
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 October 1956
Production Date:
10 March---early May 1956
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc. & Arwin Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 October 1956
Copyright Number:
LP7272
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
97, 99 or 109
Length(in feet):
8,752
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18224
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

One evening while driving to their home in Monterey, California, trusting wife Julie Benton confronts her husband Lyle about his recent public fit of jealousy. Lyle accelerates the car, which swerves precariously on the ocean cliff road while a terrified Julie scrambles to keep control of the steering wheel. After Lyle finally stops the car and asks her forgiveness, Julie is so confused by the near-death experience that she can feel only pity for her husband’s emotional condition. Later that night, Julie informs Lyle that family friend Cliff Henderson has told her that her first husband’s suicide was not due to financial crisis as they had previously been led to believe. Lyle admits that he was covetous of Julie even while she was still married to Bob and demands she forget about him. The next day at a country club, Julie meets Cliff, who explains that Bob refused a loan just before his death, claiming he had no need of it. Suspecting foul play, Cliff questions Julie about Lyle's recent public outbursts and suggests that Bob's death could have been a murder arranged to look like a suicide. Under Cliff’s persistent questioning, Julie finally admits that Lyle was a guest in their home the night Bob died. That night when Julie, in an attempt to find the truth, passionately tells Lyle if Bob had not committed suicide, she would have considered killing him so that she and Lyle could be together. Lyle then admits to murdering Bob, and warns Julie not to leave him. The next morning, desperate to flee her murderous husband, Julie claims she needs to borrow some breakfast items from the neighbors and attempts to leave. ... +


One evening while driving to their home in Monterey, California, trusting wife Julie Benton confronts her husband Lyle about his recent public fit of jealousy. Lyle accelerates the car, which swerves precariously on the ocean cliff road while a terrified Julie scrambles to keep control of the steering wheel. After Lyle finally stops the car and asks her forgiveness, Julie is so confused by the near-death experience that she can feel only pity for her husband’s emotional condition. Later that night, Julie informs Lyle that family friend Cliff Henderson has told her that her first husband’s suicide was not due to financial crisis as they had previously been led to believe. Lyle admits that he was covetous of Julie even while she was still married to Bob and demands she forget about him. The next day at a country club, Julie meets Cliff, who explains that Bob refused a loan just before his death, claiming he had no need of it. Suspecting foul play, Cliff questions Julie about Lyle's recent public outbursts and suggests that Bob's death could have been a murder arranged to look like a suicide. Under Cliff’s persistent questioning, Julie finally admits that Lyle was a guest in their home the night Bob died. That night when Julie, in an attempt to find the truth, passionately tells Lyle if Bob had not committed suicide, she would have considered killing him so that she and Lyle could be together. Lyle then admits to murdering Bob, and warns Julie not to leave him. The next morning, desperate to flee her murderous husband, Julie claims she needs to borrow some breakfast items from the neighbors and attempts to leave. When Lyle insists on accompanying her, Julie suggests he go alone, hoping she can make her escape in his absence. As Julie furiously packs her belongings, a suspicious Lyle secretly returns to the house and tampers with the car. After Julie discovers the car will not start, she hitches a ride into town, where she meets Cliff at the police station. After reporting the murder to detectives Pope and Cole, Julie learns that without concrete evidence to reopen Bob's case, the police cannot help her. Meanwhile, Lyle has told the police that Julie and Cliff are having an affair and denies all charges against him. Seeing Julie in the police hallway, Lyle bitterly warns her that she is making a mistake. Knowing Julie must flee Monterey, Cliff helps her drive to San Francisco and check into a hotel under an assumed name. However, with the help of a private detective, Lyle locates Julie that night and calls her in her room. Fearing for her life, Julie, accompanied by Cliff, meets with San Francisco police detective Capt. Pringle and Det. Mace, who caution that this pattern of abuse often ends in the wife's death. After they suggest that she change her identity, Julie decides to return to her former job as an airline hostess and moves to New York. Months later, after Julie has settled into a new life, she wires Cliff to meet her at co-worker Denice Martin’s San Francisco apartment during an airline stop-over. When Lyle calls Cliff’s office later that day, the secretary unknowingly tells him Cliff is meeting with a "private party" in San Francisco, prompting the murderer to tail Cliff as he leaves town. Noticing that he is being followed, Cliff stops his car to confront Lyle, who holds him at gunpoint and orders Cliff to get in the car and take him to Julie. As they drive off, Cliff jumps from the car, prompting Lyle to shoot him. After Lyle finds Julie's address in the injured Cliff's jacket and takes off in the car, he decides he must return and kill Cliff. Meanwhile, the wounded Cliff drags himself to a house owned by the elderly Ellis, who calls the sheriff. Lyle, overhearing the conversation from outside the house, flees. In his delirium, Cliff can only mumble Julie’s apartment building location but is unable to give the police the apartment number. Meanwhile an airline dispatcher calls Julie to cover a flight that night. While Pringle and Mace begin knocking on each of the sixty-four apartments in the building, they miss Julie as she runs down the stairs. Although Julie spots Lyle following her as she catches a cab to the airport, she fails to see him on the tarmac as he boards her flight. Back in the apartment building, the officers find a note Julie has left for Cliff, which explains her abrupt departure. Concerned that Lyle has learned of Julie's flight, Pringle radios the cockpit and after explaining to Julie that Lyle has wounded Cliff, orders the pilots to keep the plane in California airspace. Pringle warns Julie that she must calmly try to find out if Lyle is on board without drawing attention to herself. Checking row by row, Julie spots Lyle, but as she approaches the cockpit to tell the pilot, her eyes meet Lyle's, prompting the murderer to jump from his seat, grab Julie and force his way into the cockpit, where he shoots the pilot. Telling Julie that she must fly the plane alone, he then shoots the co-pilot, who fires in return, knocking Lyle unconscious. Hearing the shots, the passengers panic, while a doctor on board pronounces the pilot dead and warns the wounded co-pilot that he is liable to black out at any time. With only twenty-six minutes remaining before the plane reaches the San Francisco airport, Pringle orders a shaken Julie to land the aircraft with help from the radio control tower and the barely conscious co-pilot. Learning that she must keep the nose level, Julie practices balancing the plane for their landing. Meanwhile, ambulances and fire trucks ready themselves at the runway as hundreds of airport patrons gather at the windows to see the emergency landing. Using radar, the control tower guides Julie to runway, where a ground crew radios her final landing instructions. Julie’s first touch-down ends when she bounces back into the air. She then attempts to land again, pulls the throttle back and brings the plane to a complete stop, thus averting any further consequence of Lyle's murderous rage.


+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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