The Proud Ones (1956)

94 mins | Western | May 1956

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HISTORY

In Dec 1952, soon after the purchase of Verne Athanas' novel by Twentieth Century-Fox, a FD news item announced that Victor Mature, Robert Wagner and Debra Paget had been tentatively set for the leads. A Dec 1952 Var news item added that Frank P. Rosenberg was to produce. By Feb 1955, a DV news item noted that Gregory Peck was to star. Late 1955 HR news items yield the following information about the production: On 2 Nov 1955, it was announced that Gary Cooper was to star and that Gerd Oswald was to direct. An 11 Nov 1955 item stated that Madison was to play "Thad." By late Dec 1955, it was announced that Robert Stack was to star, and that Guy Madison had dropped out of the cast to appear in Hilda Crane (See Entry). Studio publicity contained in the film's production file at the AMPAS Library adds that location shooting was done around Nogales, AZ. Modern sources add Frank Gerstle, Charles Tannen, Harrison Lewis and Paul Burns to the cast. ...

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In Dec 1952, soon after the purchase of Verne Athanas' novel by Twentieth Century-Fox, a FD news item announced that Victor Mature, Robert Wagner and Debra Paget had been tentatively set for the leads. A Dec 1952 Var news item added that Frank P. Rosenberg was to produce. By Feb 1955, a DV news item noted that Gregory Peck was to star. Late 1955 HR news items yield the following information about the production: On 2 Nov 1955, it was announced that Gary Cooper was to star and that Gerd Oswald was to direct. An 11 Nov 1955 item stated that Madison was to play "Thad." By late Dec 1955, it was announced that Robert Stack was to star, and that Guy Madison had dropped out of the cast to appear in Hilda Crane (See Entry). Studio publicity contained in the film's production file at the AMPAS Library adds that location shooting was done around Nogales, AZ. Modern sources add Frank Gerstle, Charles Tannen, Harrison Lewis and Paul Burns to the cast.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
2 Jun 1956
---
Daily Variety
23 Feb 1955
---
Daily Variety
25 May 1956
p. 3
Film Daily
24 Dec 1952
---
Film Daily
12 Jun 1956
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 1955
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
11 Nov 1955
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
29 Dec 1955
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jan 1956
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 1956
p. 12
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 1956
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
2 Jun 1956
p. 921
New York Times
11 Aug 1956
p. 10
Variety
3 Dec 1952
---
Variety
30 May 1956
p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Robert D. Webb
Dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Edmund North
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Lyle R. Wheeler
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Exec ward des
Cost des
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair styling
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Proud Ones by Verne Athanas (New York, 1952).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
May 1956
Production Date:
early Jan--early Feb 1956
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
29 May 1956
LP6940
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
lenses by Bausch & Lomb
Duration(in mins):
94
Length(in feet):
8,468
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17931
SYNOPSIS

In a Kansas cattle boom town, Marshal Cass Silver struggles to maintain law and order in the face of the town's greed and avarice. Anticipating the arrival of another trail crew, the citizenry greedily boosts the prices of goods and services, while Cass proposes to his longtime sweetheart Sally, the proprietor of the local boardinghouse. Cass's serenity is short-lived, however, when he learns that Honest John Barrett, a crooked casino owner who is his archenemy, has just bought the Palace saloon. Proceeding to the Palace to inspect the gaming tables, Cass is confronted by Thad Anderson, one of the trail crew, who accuses the marshal of shooting his father down in cold blood in the town of Keystone. After Cass uncovers a fixed blackjack game, he demands to see Barrett, and to protect his boss, one of Barrett's thugs shoots at Cass, grazing him in the head. Reflexively reaching for his gun, Thad kills Cass's assailant and is himself wounded in the crossfire. Grateful, Cass arranges for Sally to nurse the injured Thad and offers him a job as relief jailer. Soon after, Cass experiences a blinding headache, the result of his wound, that impairs his vision. Later, Sally visits Barrett and after warning him not to provoke Cass, informs him that she was the one who forced Cass to leave Keystone to avoid a confrontation. As Sally describes the incident at Keystone, Cass calls Thad into his office and recalls the night his father was shot. Cass explains that Thad's father, John Anderson, was working in Keystone for Barrett as a hired gun and that Cass shot him in self-defense. ...

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In a Kansas cattle boom town, Marshal Cass Silver struggles to maintain law and order in the face of the town's greed and avarice. Anticipating the arrival of another trail crew, the citizenry greedily boosts the prices of goods and services, while Cass proposes to his longtime sweetheart Sally, the proprietor of the local boardinghouse. Cass's serenity is short-lived, however, when he learns that Honest John Barrett, a crooked casino owner who is his archenemy, has just bought the Palace saloon. Proceeding to the Palace to inspect the gaming tables, Cass is confronted by Thad Anderson, one of the trail crew, who accuses the marshal of shooting his father down in cold blood in the town of Keystone. After Cass uncovers a fixed blackjack game, he demands to see Barrett, and to protect his boss, one of Barrett's thugs shoots at Cass, grazing him in the head. Reflexively reaching for his gun, Thad kills Cass's assailant and is himself wounded in the crossfire. Grateful, Cass arranges for Sally to nurse the injured Thad and offers him a job as relief jailer. Soon after, Cass experiences a blinding headache, the result of his wound, that impairs his vision. Later, Sally visits Barrett and after warning him not to provoke Cass, informs him that she was the one who forced Cass to leave Keystone to avoid a confrontation. As Sally describes the incident at Keystone, Cass calls Thad into his office and recalls the night his father was shot. Cass explains that Thad's father, John Anderson, was working in Keystone for Barrett as a hired gun and that Cass shot him in self-defense. Shortly after the shooting, however, Barrett started rumors that Anderson was unarmed, thus forcing Cass to leave town or face down Barrett and his thugs. Shortly after Cass's revelation, Chico and Pike, two vicious gunslingers hired by Barrett, come to town to eliminate Cass. Thad, still simmering with anger over his father's death, approaches Barrett for a job as a gunslinger, but once Barrett rejects him, Thad accepts Cass's offer to be the relief jailer. After Cass arrests two of Barrett's thugs for trying to mug a drunk who won too much while gambling, Pike and Chico try to intimidate the marshal into freeing the men. Soon after, a gambler accuses the dealer of cheating and is gunned down by Dillon, Barrett's saloon manager. Although Dillon claims that he shot in self-defense, Cass arrests him when the dead man's friend accuses him of murder. Amid the mounting tensions, Cass's deputy, Jim Dexter, quits because his pregnant wife has begged him to look for a safer job. That night, Chico and Pike stalk Cass through the streets. Suffering another blinding headache, Cass dodges their bullets and then hurries to see Dr. Barlow, who warns him that he has pressure on his optic nerve and should see a specialist in Kansas City. Aware that his condition will make him easy prey, Cass asks the doctor to keep it secret. In the wake of Jim's resignation, Cass promotes Thad to deputy, and one evening, as they stroll through town, Chico, seemingly drunk and unarmed, nonchalantly threatens to kill Cass and then walks away. Cass, hearing the click of a gun cocking, fires at Chico and kills him, causing Thad to accuse him of being trigger happy. After uncovering the hidden gun from Chico's clenched hand, Cass shows the weapon to Thad, but Barrett, hoping to incite the boy, claims that he confiscated Chico's gun because he was drunk. The next day, Thad apologizes to Cass for misjudging him. Later, the city council summons Cass, and after criticizing him for harassing Barrett, asks for his letter of resignation. Cass refuses to tender his resignation until his prisoners stand trial and, after recommending Thad as his replacement, denounces the town for selling out law and order for the promise of a "quick buck." Sally, who has learned of Cass's condition from Dr. Barlow, insists they leave town that night, and after Cass declines out of a sense of duty, she exclaims that his pride will kill him. Their conversation is interrupted by the sound of gunfire, and Cass takes to the street to find that the prisoners have broken out of jail and murdered Jake, the jailer. As Thad and Cass track the fugitives to the barn, Dillon and the others lie in wait. In the ensuing shootout, Cass is blinded by another one of his headaches and confesses to Thad that he cannot see. Thad stands by Cass, who soon regains his vision and shoots down Dillon while Thad dispatches the others. After Cass is wounded in the melee, Thad helps him into Sally's carriage. Thad proceeds to the saloon to confront Barrett, and Cass instructs Sally to follow him. Thad strides into the saloon and informs Barrett that he is under arrest for murder. Making light of the situation, Barrett turns to the bar to pour a drink and palms a hidden gun, but Thad outwits him and shoots first. Smiling, Cass walks out of the saloon with Sally. When Sally insists on going to Kansas City for treatment, Cass agrees, asserting that, thanks to Thad, he no longer has to run away.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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