Teenage Rebel (1956)

93-94 mins | Drama | November 1956

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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were A Roomful of Roses and Our Teenage Daughter . The viewed print lacked many critical crew credits, including producer and director, as does the film's cutting continuity contained in the copyright records. Cast credits were on the viewed print, however. According to HR news items, in Nov 1955, Samuel Engel was announced as the film's producer and Eleanor Griffin the screenwriter. At that time, Jennifer Jones was being sought as the lead. By Feb 1956, HR noted that Charles Brackett had taken over the production from Engel, whose schedule prevented him from making the picture. Although HR news items place Valerie Smith, Kathryn Reed, Leroy Allen and Jim Lampre in the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. A Jan 1956 HR news item states that Virginia Leith was being considered for a top role, but she does not appear in the film.
       Betty Lou Keim and Warren Berlinger, who play the parts of "Dodie" and "Dick" in the film, originated those roles in the Broadway production of Edith Sommer's play. Teenage Rebel marked the screen debut of Rusty Swope, the son of producer Herbert Bayard Swope. Teenage Rebel was nominated for the following Academy Awards: Best Art Direction-Set Decoration and Best Costume ... More Less

The working titles of this film were A Roomful of Roses and Our Teenage Daughter . The viewed print lacked many critical crew credits, including producer and director, as does the film's cutting continuity contained in the copyright records. Cast credits were on the viewed print, however. According to HR news items, in Nov 1955, Samuel Engel was announced as the film's producer and Eleanor Griffin the screenwriter. At that time, Jennifer Jones was being sought as the lead. By Feb 1956, HR noted that Charles Brackett had taken over the production from Engel, whose schedule prevented him from making the picture. Although HR news items place Valerie Smith, Kathryn Reed, Leroy Allen and Jim Lampre in the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. A Jan 1956 HR news item states that Virginia Leith was being considered for a top role, but she does not appear in the film.
       Betty Lou Keim and Warren Berlinger, who play the parts of "Dodie" and "Dick" in the film, originated those roles in the Broadway production of Edith Sommer's play. Teenage Rebel marked the screen debut of Rusty Swope, the son of producer Herbert Bayard Swope. Teenage Rebel was nominated for the following Academy Awards: Best Art Direction-Set Decoration and Best Costume Design. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27 Oct 1956.
---
Daily Variety
24 Oct 56
p. 3.
Film Daily
26 Oct 56
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Nov 55
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jan 56
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Feb 56
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 56
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 56
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 56
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 56
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 56
p. 6, 10.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 56
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jul 56
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 56
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 Oct 56
p. 121.
New York Times
17 Nov 56
p. 17.
Variety
24 Oct 56
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Exec ward des
Cost des
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair styles
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play A Roomful of Roses by Edith Sommer (New York, 17 Oct 1955).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Cool It, Baby," words and music by Lionel Newman and Carroll Coates, sung by Dick Lory
"Dodie," words and music by Ralph Freed and Edmund Goulding.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
A Roomful of Roses
Our Teenage Daughter
Release Date:
November 1956
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 16 November 1956
Production Date:
late June--20 July 1956
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
26 October 1956
Copyright Number:
LP7379
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
lenses by Bausch & Lomb
Duration(in mins):
93-94
Length(in feet):
8,475
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18209
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In California, Nancy Fallon eagerly anticipates the arrival of Dodie, her fifteen-year-old daughter whom she has not seen since her divorce eight years earlier. Nancy lost custody of Dodie to her first husband, the wealthy Eric McGowan, who wanted to punish her. Nancy fled their desperately unhappy marriage and fell in love with Jay Fallon, to whom she is now married and shares a seven-year-old son, Larry. Although the court mandated that Dodie spend three weeks a year with her mother, Eric took the girl to Europe to prevent Nancy from seeing her. Eric has relented, however, and agreed to the visitation so that he can run off and marry Helen Sheldon without first informing his daughter. When Nancy comes to the airport to meet Dodie, she fails to recognize her now nearly-grown daughter. Aloof and affecting an air of superiority and sophistication, Dodie insists on being called Dorothy and refuses to address Nancy as "mother." At the Fallon home, Dodie snidely comments on the modesty of the dwelling designed by Jay, an architect, and then snubs Dick and Jane Hewitt, the two affable teenagers who live next door. Rejecting her mother's overtures of friendship, Dodie calls her father in New York and asks to come home, but Eric tells Dodie that legally, she must remain with Nancy for three weeks. In an attempt to break through Dodie's defenses, Jay offers Dick and Jane money to befriend the lonely girl, and Dick agrees to paint Dodie's name on the jalopy he is building for a big drag race. When Jane comes to visit, Dodie discusses her father's new romantic interest, but ... +


In California, Nancy Fallon eagerly anticipates the arrival of Dodie, her fifteen-year-old daughter whom she has not seen since her divorce eight years earlier. Nancy lost custody of Dodie to her first husband, the wealthy Eric McGowan, who wanted to punish her. Nancy fled their desperately unhappy marriage and fell in love with Jay Fallon, to whom she is now married and shares a seven-year-old son, Larry. Although the court mandated that Dodie spend three weeks a year with her mother, Eric took the girl to Europe to prevent Nancy from seeing her. Eric has relented, however, and agreed to the visitation so that he can run off and marry Helen Sheldon without first informing his daughter. When Nancy comes to the airport to meet Dodie, she fails to recognize her now nearly-grown daughter. Aloof and affecting an air of superiority and sophistication, Dodie insists on being called Dorothy and refuses to address Nancy as "mother." At the Fallon home, Dodie snidely comments on the modesty of the dwelling designed by Jay, an architect, and then snubs Dick and Jane Hewitt, the two affable teenagers who live next door. Rejecting her mother's overtures of friendship, Dodie calls her father in New York and asks to come home, but Eric tells Dodie that legally, she must remain with Nancy for three weeks. In an attempt to break through Dodie's defenses, Jay offers Dick and Jane money to befriend the lonely girl, and Dick agrees to paint Dodie's name on the jalopy he is building for a big drag race. When Jane comes to visit, Dodie discusses her father's new romantic interest, but then abruptly withdraws and angrily dismisses Jane. Taking the offensive, Dick climbs up a tree to Dodie's second-floor window and invites her to the drag race, but she refuses his invitation. After Dodie informs Nancy that she would like to return home two days early, Nancy senses the girl's loneliness and warns that life can be empty and miserable without love. Nancy then recalls fleeing from the deep unhappiness of her loveless marriage to Eric, causing Dodie, seething with resentment and feeling abandoned, to declare that her mother is dead. Determined to make a "regular kid" out of Dodie, Jay buys her a frilly party dress to wear to the big country club dance. Dodie sneaks out the back door and proceeds to the local soda fountain, where Dick finds her sneering at the other teens. When Dick takes a backward pratfall off his stool, Dodie laughs in spite of herself. Later, Dick escorts a smiling Dodie home and she calls Nancy "mother" for the first time. At the drag race, Dodie cheers Dick on, and when his engine bursts into flames, she consoles him in his defeat. Afterward, Nancy is puzzled when Dodie refuses to attend the dance party at the Hewitt house until she realizes that her daughter is embarrassed because she does not know how to dance. Nancy then presents her with the pink frilly dress that Jay bought and tutors the girl in the jitterbug. On the eve of the country club dance, Dodie, dreamy-eyed, confides to Nancy that she is in love with Dick. Next door, as Dick dresses to take Dodie to the dance, Madeline Johnson, his Southern belle sweetheart who has spent the summer in Texas, shows up, expecting Dick to escort her to the club. Dick hurries to the Fallon house for advice, just as Dodie sweeps down the stairs in her pink dress. After confessing that he has been going steady with the absent Madeline, Dick tells Dodie that Madeline now means nothing to him because he has fallen in love with her. Feeling betrayed, Dodie insists on calling her father, and when Nancy tells her that Eric is away on his honeymoon, Dodie accuses everyone of lying to her and rips her dress in anger. The next day, Nancy takes Dodie back to New York, where her father has just returned with his new bride Helen. Dodie defiantly declares that she wants to return to school immediately. When her father willingly consents, relieved to be rid of her, Nancy protests. After Helen reassures Nancy that she genuinely likes Dodie and will be solicitous of her, Nancy pleads with her daughter to stay at home with her father and his new wife, then says goodbye and leaves. Running after her in tears, Dodie pleads with Nancy to take her home to California. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.